Qn on jade bangle

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  1. Thanks, Storm Spirit, for the education. I am actually very interested, if you wouldn't mind translating the article (from Chinese?). Luckily, I had most of my pricier jade pieces examined by a gemologist and was relieved to find out they were the real deal (not dyed/treated). What I would suggest, when purchasing jade represented as natural and not treated from a dealer, insist they write on the receipt that if it is discoved otherwise, the jade is returnable with full refund. If they refuse, I would not purchase jade from them. I've found that this always worked for me.
     
  2. Yep the original article is in Chinese. The first couple of paragraphs basically summarize the difference between natural & treated jade and how their prices vary - type A is typically 10x the price of type B.

    The author happens to own a couple of type B bangles. They look pretty:
    [​IMG]

    Bangle on the left - can't really tell from a distance
    [​IMG]

    However, up close you can see that the surface doesn't look smooth:
    [​IMG]

    This is more obvious when magnified:
    [​IMG]

    It doesn't really have any internal structure when you hold it up to the light. With type A jadeite you should be able to see its dense mineral structure, which has translucent chunks resembling flies' wings (shown in pics further down).
    [​IMG]

    Magnified:
    [​IMG]

    Bangle on the right is a good fake and looks like it could be the real thing, but again, look closely at its surface.
    [​IMG]

    Magnified:
    [​IMG]

    Same when held up to the light. Looks blurry, kind of "gooey" (from the injected silicone)
    [​IMG]

    Even more obvious up close:
    [​IMG]

    Next up is a natural untreated bangle. The structure is denser and it looks more "solid" overall:
    [​IMG]

    Looks the same zoomed in - smooth surface, despite this being a cheap bangle:
    [​IMG]

    Held up to the light:
    [​IMG]

    Characteristics of jadeite, known as flies' wings:
    [​IMG]

    Internal structure looks dense:
    [​IMG]

    Pic below is natural icy jadeite (expensive!) Even though it's almost transparent its internal structure can still be seen.
    [​IMG]

    Flies' wings magnified:
    [​IMG]

    Super smooth surface:
    [​IMG]

    Magnified:
    [​IMG]

    Hope this helps! :biggrin:
     
    Hanni84 likes this.
  3. Wow, how comprehensive! I'm going to be checking out my green bangle (on my arm since the '90s) with a loupe to check for an uneven surface (i couldn't have this examined by a gemologist since it is on my arm most likely for eternity or until it breaks), though, frankly, it feels completely smooth as glass when I run my fingers on the surface. It is also fairly translucent, which has increased over the years, and the color has deepened a bit, as well (see pix posted earlier in this thread, though they do not come close to how pretty it looks IRL). Thanks, again, for the translation, and you should seriously consider a career in the biz.:smile:
     
  4. You're very welcome :biggrin:

    Another way to tell if your bangle is natural (though from what you've described, it very likely is) is to compare it to the one you've had appraised - both bangles' surfaces should be glass like as opposed to dull & waxy. Also, the dye in treated bangles will fade over time; if yours is fake and you've been wearing it for 10+ years, you would definitely have noticed the difference.

    Advice for anyone looking for a jade bangle - do not buy one on ebay. The vast majority are either fake or way, way, overpriced.
     
  5. Wonderful information Storm Spirit. Thankyou! I have a few jade bangles that I've always wondered about. I never thought to look at them with a loupe tho. Now I see that the one that I thought might be good quality has that pitted looking surface through a 10X loupe. And the one that I thought was not so great, a spinach looking varigated one, has a perfectly smooth surface. Hmmm. It still may not be great quality though, is that right?
     
  6. I've never thought to look at jade through a loupe! I had one I bought from a stall at a local county fair and one I picked up second hand on ebay. Neither were expensive, I picked them because I liked the colors. The ebay one was too big and I gave it to my MIL and I cracked the other accidently and may have thrown it out. I think I shall bring my loupe with me if I ever make it to see what the pawn shops have.
     
  7. I checked out my bangle near a sunny window with a magnifying glass and do not see any pits, so that, along with the color deepening and increased translucency, leads me to believe I actually do have a good quality one - hey, it cost mucho $$$, even 10+ years ago, so thanks again for the info. I would not purchase jade on the bay either - only from a Chinese source (for high quality jade, at least).
     
  8. Thanks for the info, Storm Spirit, it was very educational.

    I was wondering - for those of you who wear your bangles all the time, is it okay to wear jade in the swimming pool? Is chlorine harmful to jade?
     
  9. #84 Jul 14, 2012
    Last edited: Jul 14, 2012
    Type A just means that it's not chemically treated. You could find A bangles for < $50 for example, but they won't be of great quality.

    A general rule of thumb - the greener and more translucent the jade is, the more expensive it will be. The "best" shade is pure green with no other colour tints, known as imperial green. I'm personally not a fan of this green but it's very sought after by buyers & collectors alike :P

    As a side note, you'll see most sources refer to jade as grade A, grade B, and so forth. "Grade" imo implies that there's a ranking system where A > B > B+C which isn't necessarily the case, as a very well made B+C (and sold as such) could fetch a larger sum than a poor quality A.
     
  10. If it's a natural A jade, there shouldn't be any problems. Jade is a very hard & durable substance (as long as you don't slam or drop it) and as the chlorine doesn't harm skin, it won't even scratch jade so don't worry. But it's still advised to remove bangles prior to any exercise, just in case.
     
  11. If you still have the bangles and wear them on a regular basis, I'd strongly recommend not doing so. When I posted a pic of my treated bangle to get opinions on a Chinese forum, the general consensus was that I should remove it asap, because these bangles are harmful to your health.
     
  12. There's just so much to learn about jade it's fascinating! To think just a week ago I was still a complete jade newbie, it was only when I received the fake bangle that I became interested and wanted to know more, which opened a huge can of worms and I've spent countless hours hunting down an A bangle since :lol:
     
  13. Thats a relief! I love swimming and would hate to have to remove my bangle each time i go to the pool. It isnt very easy to remove. Quite painful, in fact. Do let us know when you find your bangle
     
  14. all this talk makes me want to go out and get my jade bangle !:woot:
     
  15. Thanks for sharing your info! There seems to be so much involved in jade hunting, huh? I'd love to learn more. Please do share when you find your bangle. :smile:
     
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