Do you think LV resale is affected by new Micro chip authentication

amateurjeweler

Midas Jr.
Jun 30, 2011
368
532
Best Coast, USA
Given that LV has long treated its canvas/leather goods differently with respect to coding, hence differentiating its categories, why would a change to chipping create confusion? LV's systems of production and product management are mostly opaque to consumers.

I think resale is impacted by numerous factors, beyond whether a code is visible or not.
Why wouldn't the implementation of a novel authentication technology create confusion? I haven't read anything saying that LV is using the tech only to replace date codes on bags, hence why I asked if anyone had more information. If you know of a source saying this please link.

I am curious because I don't really care for LV bags but I enjoy their accessories. Hence I might postpone purchases in certain non-bag categories if I know they're going to be releasing items of the same model with chips or cryptographic codes of some type soon. Even though I buy what I love in order to keep, I don't want to buy something if its points of authentication will be functionally and/or technologically obsolete within the next year or two. But that's just my way of thinking.
 

onlyk

Member
Feb 25, 2015
2,473
2,271
Garden City
Frankly I don't think the new chip thing is going to effect second hand market dramatically, price drives everything, as long as price is good, it sells chip or not chipped, for people concern about authenticity, there are some only would buy from the boutique, but there are a lot more will still buy from second hand market as long as there are some sort of guarantee, then there are people never know date code thing, they buy it as long as its there fits their needs,

regarding repair, who repairs, nowadays people buy something then repair to use again are minority, and there are lots of private companies do repair for you too, I saw people selling bags been retouched and refubrished / repaired by off brand companies and selling them for high prices too

plus, chips are a lot easier to conterfeit than date code in my opinion, so LV CHANEL etc these brands may shot themselves in the foot, it is harder to tell what exactly will turn out, time will tell though
 

MissV

O.G.
Why wouldn't the implementation of a novel authentication technology create confusion? I haven't read anything saying that LV is using the tech only to replace date codes on bags, hence why I asked if anyone had more information. If you know of a source saying this please link.

I am curious because I don't really care for LV bags but I enjoy their accessories. Hence I might postpone purchases in certain non-bag categories if I know they're going to be releasing items of the same model with chips or cryptographic codes of some type soon. Even though I buy what I love in order to keep, I don't want to buy something if its points of authentication will be functionally and/or technologically obsolete within the next year or two. But that's just my way of thinking.
I don't think blockchain is going anywhere soon, it actually will be more intergrated into our lives.


Frankly I don't think the new chip thing is going to effect second hand market dramatically, price drives everything, as long as price is good, it sells chip or not chipped, for people concern about authenticity, there are some only would buy from the boutique, but there are a lot more will still buy from second hand market as long as there are some sort of guarantee, then there are people never know date code thing, they buy it as long as its there fits their needs,

regarding repair, who repairs, nowadays people buy something then repair to use again are minority

plus, chips are a lot easier to conterfeit than date code in my opinion, so LV CHANEL etc these brands may shot themselves in the foot, it is harder to tell what exactly will turn out, time will tell though

The chips information are set in a blockchain, impossible to counterfeit as it's "information history" will exist on a chain and can be confirmed by multiple sources.
 

onlyk

Member
Feb 25, 2015
2,473
2,271
Garden City
I don't think blockchain is going anywhere soon, it actually will be more intergrated into our lives.





The chips information are set in a blockchain, impossible to counterfeit as it's "information history" will exist on a chain and can be confirmed by multiple sources.
there is nothing can not be copied, LV started experiement in 2019 with the chip thing and right then the conterfeiters already produced bags can be read by reader.
 

BULL

Member
Apr 19, 2015
1,184
2,517
plus, chips are a lot easier to conterfeit than date code in my opinion
With all due respect: it is not a matter of opinion. The basic formula of the old date codes are freely available online to everytone. A sweatshop can look it up in seconds and start pushing out products with perfectly reasonable date codes. They want to make a Speedy B 25 in Damier Azur? They go to eBay, check the date codes on a few recent listings and start to vomit out bags with — again — perfectly accurate date codes. It is so easy that even you and I could do it. Looking up a date code and getting a metal stamp manufactured for it is done in a day for less than $30. This is nowhere near safe. And the date codes are not serial numbers, they are not for authentication. People here made a false religion, since they wanted to have faith in something, and they chose the date codes as the most important factor of authenticity. Not the materials, not the thread, not the leather, not the glazing, not the overall feel, but that basic industrial marking. The code, that is not just not unique at all, but by nature appears on thousands of items a week. For example: most canvas Keepalls and Bandoliere Speedys are made in Ducey, Normandy. Those products sell like hot cakes. It means that there are thousands and thousands of items with the exact same code of DU0211. How does that prove authenticity?
As @MissV absolutely accurately pointed out, these codes are not just simple serial numbers wth a formula that can be guessed. Reading them requires an LV owned iOS device and a secure connection to the LV server, that can decode it. If mere mortals decode the RFID chip's data, they only get a very long gibberish.
But imagine if some magician could find out the sercet formula and create a code. The code in itself would mean nothing, since it should be on the LV blockchain. Which means that LV product data is practically working like BitCoin. It is called a chain, because all of the elements are tied onto an indestructible chain. So basically:
- they produce a Speedy, they generate a unique code for it, and link that code to the end of the blockchain
- they make another Speedy, and they link its code after the previous code
- and so on, and so on...
This blockchain technology has 2 major benefits:
- no elements can be removed, since once 1 is removed, the whole chain collapsed, all data is broken
- no elements can be added in secret, if the server adds a new link to the chain, all the other 'chain pieces' will know about this, and it will be transparently visible for every user. So if a hacker would want to add a new link from the outside to the secure Louis Vuitton chain on the company server, LV would know in a split second.
So to sum it up, the blockchain based chips are insanely secure, the serial number and the chips that other brands used in the past are toys compared to this.

The whole problem derives from people's instincitive need for a 100%-sure sign of authenticity. And in reality, Louis Vuitton never provided any. Ever. They have one 100%-sure formula, and they want us to use that only: buying from them from their boutiques.
The date codes were never meant for this, the Internet people came up with this idea, that "if a code matches this, then it is probably maybe authentic". It is bs, but it was a very handy belief for everyone: people got a piece of mind, resellers got less suspicious buyers, and the so-called "authenticators" got work. Win-win-win. Or at least people loved to feel like that.

This new code, no matter how secure and accurate, only does its magic for Louis Vuitton. We mortals won't be able to check them, unless an SA is kind enough to do so.
But this was the case in the classic datecode era too. No one else besides Louis Vuitton could tell if an item is authentic or not. And they could check authenticity in the past too, they used many (many many) small variances during production, they documented them, and when an item needed to be checked, the original workshop that made that item could check it easily, since they knew exactly that on that week of that year, how they made the Speedys. But it only worked with the know-how of the ateliers, the date code only told Vuitton which atelier they should go to for a check. So the old codes were not a sign of authentictity, but merely an address of the place Vuitton (and no one else) can go to for authentication.

Sorry for the long post.
 

onlyk

Member
Feb 25, 2015
2,473
2,271
Garden City
With all due respect: it is not a matter of opinion. The basic formula of the old date codes are freely available online to everytone. A sweatshop can look it up in seconds and start pushing out products with perfectly reasonable date codes. They want to make a Speedy B 25 in Damier Azur? They go to eBay, check the date codes on a few recent listings and start to vomit out bags with — again — perfectly accurate date codes. It is so easy that even you and I could do it. Looking up a date code and getting a metal stamp manufactured for it is done in a day for less than $30. This is nowhere near safe. And the date codes are not serial numbers, they are not for authentication. People here made a false religion, since they wanted to have faith in something, and they chose the date codes as the most important factor of authenticity. Not the materials, not the thread, not the leather, not the glazing, not the overall feel, but that basic industrial marking. The code, that is not just not unique at all, but by nature appears on thousands of items a week. For example: most canvas Keepalls and Bandoliere Speedys are made in Ducey, Normandy. Those products sell like hot cakes. It means that there are thousands and thousands of items with the exact same code of DU0211. How does that prove authenticity?
As @MissV absolutely accurately pointed out, these codes are not just simple serial numbers wth a formula that can be guessed. Reading them requires an LV owned iOS device and a secure connection to the LV server, that can decode it. If mere mortals decode the RFID chip's data, they only get a very long gibberish.
But imagine if some magician could find out the sercet formula and create a code. The code in itself would mean nothing, since it should be on the LV blockchain. Which means that LV product data is practically working like BitCoin. It is called a chain, because all of the elements are tied onto an indestructible chain. So basically:
- they produce a Speedy, they generate a unique code for it, and link that code to the end of the blockchain
- they make another Speedy, and they link its code after the previous code
- and so on, and so on...
This blockchain technology has 2 major benefits:
- no elements can be removed, since once 1 is removed, the whole chain collapsed, all data is broken
- no elements can be added in secret, if the server adds a new link to the chain, all the other 'chain pieces' will know about this, and it will be transparently visible for every user. So if a hacker would want to add a new link from the outside to the secure Louis Vuitton chain on the company server, LV would know in a split second.
So to sum it up, the blockchain based chips are insanely secure, the serial number and the chips that other brands used in the past are toys compared to this.

The whole problem derives from people's instincitive need for a 100%-sure sign of authenticity. And in reality, Louis Vuitton never provided any. Ever. They have one 100%-sure formula, and they want us to use that only: buying from them from their boutiques.
The date codes were never meant for this, the Internet people came up with this idea, that "if a code matches this, then it is probably maybe authentic". It is bs, but it was a very handy belief for everyone: people got a piece of mind, resellers got less suspicious buyers, and the so-called "authenticators" got work. Win-win-win. Or at least people loved to feel like that.

This new code, no matter how secure and accurate, only does its magic for Louis Vuitton. We mortals won't be able to check them, unless an SA is kind enough to do so.
But this was the case in the classic datecode era too. No one else besides Louis Vuitton could tell if an item is authentic or not. And they could check authenticity in the past too, they used many (many many) small variances during production, they documented them, and when an item needed to be checked, the original workshop that made that item could check it easily, since they knew exactly that on that week of that year, how they made the Speedys. But it only worked with the know-how of the ateliers, the date code only told Vuitton which atelier they should go to for a check. So the old codes were not a sign of authentictity, but merely an address of the place Vuitton (and no one else) can go to for authentication.

Sorry for the long post.
I disagree, I have seen perfectly made counterfit LV Chanel bags can't tell if just look at the bag every details are the exact copy yet their date codes just could not make exactly right
 

CrazyCool01

Member
May 17, 2015
1,581
2,415
there is nothing can not be copied, LV started experiement in 2019 with the chip thing and right then the conterfeiters already produced bags can be read by reader.
You can copy the micro chip, place a chip alike in the bag, but the network where the information is stored is very secure. Cannot be hacked,.
If you think chip stores information then you are mistaken, info is retrieved from a very secure network !

so counterfeiters can place a chip but cannot copy technology !
 

onlyk

Member
Feb 25, 2015
2,473
2,271
Garden City
You can copy the micro chip, place a chip alike in the bag, but the network where the information is stored is very secure. Cannot be hacked,.
If you think chip stores information then you are mistaken, info is retrieved from a very secure network !

so counterfeiters can place a chip but cannot copy technology !
if the most secure places such as The White House, the banks, the goverment networks can be hacked in, the little bags with its little chip can't be hacked? hahahahaha
 

BULL

Member
Apr 19, 2015
1,184
2,517
if the most secure places such as The White House, the banks, the goverment networks can be hacked in, the little bags with its little chip can't be hacked? hahahahaha
This is an antiwaxx-level ‘argument’.
The point is that even if somehow someone could do that, LV would know about it immediately.
And security of banks and govertments are way different that cryptocurrency and blockchain. But I give up, I am not here for this. So sad.
 

CrazyCool01

Member
May 17, 2015
1,581
2,415
if the most secure places such as The White House, the banks, the goverment networks can be hacked in, the little bags with its little chip can't be hacked? hahahahaha
Yeah i agree! But am not sure counterfeiters would spend that much time and money to hack a highly secure network to make replicas.

instead they can invest same time to hack banks or stocks !
 

despair

O.G.
Apr 30, 2008
411
1,897
With all due respect: it is not a matter of opinion. The basic formula of the old date codes are freely available online to everytone. A sweatshop can look it up in seconds and start pushing out products with perfectly reasonable date codes. They want to make a Speedy B 25 in Damier Azur? They go to eBay, check the date codes on a few recent listings and start to vomit out bags with — again — perfectly accurate date codes. It is so easy that even you and I could do it. Looking up a date code and getting a metal stamp manufactured for it is done in a day for less than $30. This is nowhere near safe. And the date codes are not serial numbers, they are not for authentication. People here made a false religion, since they wanted to have faith in something, and they chose the date codes as the most important factor of authenticity. Not the materials, not the thread, not the leather, not the glazing, not the overall feel, but that basic industrial marking. The code, that is not just not unique at all, but by nature appears on thousands of items a week. For example: most canvas Keepalls and Bandoliere Speedys are made in Ducey, Normandy. Those products sell like hot cakes. It means that there are thousands and thousands of items with the exact same code of DU0211. How does that prove authenticity?
As @MissV absolutely accurately pointed out, these codes are not just simple serial numbers wth a formula that can be guessed. Reading them requires an LV owned iOS device and a secure connection to the LV server, that can decode it. If mere mortals decode the RFID chip's data, they only get a very long gibberish.
But imagine if some magician could find out the sercet formula and create a code. The code in itself would mean nothing, since it should be on the LV blockchain. Which means that LV product data is practically working like BitCoin. It is called a chain, because all of the elements are tied onto an indestructible chain. So basically:
- they produce a Speedy, they generate a unique code for it, and link that code to the end of the blockchain
- they make another Speedy, and they link its code after the previous code
- and so on, and so on...
This blockchain technology has 2 major benefits:
- no elements can be removed, since once 1 is removed, the whole chain collapsed, all data is broken
- no elements can be added in secret, if the server adds a new link to the chain, all the other 'chain pieces' will know about this, and it will be transparently visible for every user. So if a hacker would want to add a new link from the outside to the secure Louis Vuitton chain on the company server, LV would know in a split second.
So to sum it up, the blockchain based chips are insanely secure, the serial number and the chips that other brands used in the past are toys compared to this.

The whole problem derives from people's instincitive need for a 100%-sure sign of authenticity. And in reality, Louis Vuitton never provided any. Ever. They have one 100%-sure formula, and they want us to use that only: buying from them from their boutiques.
The date codes were never meant for this, the Internet people came up with this idea, that "if a code matches this, then it is probably maybe authentic". It is bs, but it was a very handy belief for everyone: people got a piece of mind, resellers got less suspicious buyers, and the so-called "authenticators" got work. Win-win-win. Or at least people loved to feel like that.

This new code, no matter how secure and accurate, only does its magic for Louis Vuitton. We mortals won't be able to check them, unless an SA is kind enough to do so.
But this was the case in the classic datecode era too. No one else besides Louis Vuitton could tell if an item is authentic or not. And they could check authenticity in the past too, they used many (many many) small variances during production, they documented them, and when an item needed to be checked, the original workshop that made that item could check it easily, since they knew exactly that on that week of that year, how they made the Speedys. But it only worked with the know-how of the ateliers, the date code only told Vuitton which atelier they should go to for a check. So the old codes were not a sign of authentictity, but merely an address of the place Vuitton (and no one else) can go to for authentication.

Sorry for the long post.
No need to be sorry at all, very refreshing and helpful to read this! Almost like a Blockchain 101 :smile:
 

MissV

O.G.
there is nothing can not be copied, LV started experiement in 2019 with the chip thing and right then the conterfeiters already produced bags can be read by reader.
Chips that are NFC can be counterfeited,
Yes, LV is using physical chips that may look the same as NFC but it's technology behind it is not the same as your conventional NFC chip

The lv chips will most likely have a unique address/code/we that are registered on a blockchain that can be tracked from conception to sale point to whatever end point it is last scanned by lv.
 

lemondln

Member
Feb 3, 2021
233
684
Ontario, Canada
Personally I am attracted to the Date codes. There is something about knowing when a bag was around. I'd love to have a bag back from June 91 when I graduated high school. Or 1999 when I started my career. I don't find a scan code all that special. If I did buy on the resale market I am not going to take the bag in to be authenticated. And it sounds like the app isn't going to show the true history of the bag anyway. I'd rather have my little date codes and feel a connection to the history of the bag.
Cannot agree more, I already miss the date code on my new Noe BB, why cannot LV keep both the date code and micro chip?

If all LV lovers send a petition, LV probably bring the date code back