What's the best way to get a corgi?

sourapril

O.G.
Oct 21, 2006
291
105
vogueandfrugal.blogspot.com
I am from Colorado. The corgi breeders here sell the puppies for around $1000. I don't really want to spend that much money on a pet. If you have a corgi, how did you acquire it? How much did you have to pay? Thanks!:P
 

lorihmatthews

A taste for the arts
O.G.
Oct 7, 2006
31,834
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San Francisco
I am a huge fan of Corgis so that price sounds about right to me. But the fact that you don't want to spend that much money on a pet concerns me. How will you provide for its care once you have one? Food? Pet insurance? Vet visits? What if the dog gets ill?
 

buzzytoes

Dog Chauffeur
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Jun 7, 2008
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I don't really see that as a concerning sign - I wouldn't want to pay that much either! But then all of my dogs have been pound puppies.

OP you can always look into corgi rescues. The fee to adopt typically runs about $200 from breed specific rescues.
 

buzzytoes

Dog Chauffeur
O.G.
Jun 7, 2008
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And keep an eye on neighboring states like Wyo. ;) We just had a Corgi somewhere (can't remember if it was the pound or humane society) so you never know where they may pop up.
 

weekender2

Member
Mar 13, 2007
3,508
2
Suggesting rescue organizations too.
Adopted a rottweiler this summer from one
And it was great :smile:
Best wishes for finding your new love!
 

Collie5

Member
Jul 25, 2012
420
2
Northern California
I am a huge fan of Corgis so that price sounds about right to me. But the fact that you don't want to spend that much money on a pet concerns me. How will you provide for its care once you have one? Food? Pet insurance? Vet visits? What if the dog gets ill?
I have to agree. And (warning I'm about to get on my soapbox) I'm a RESPONSIBLE breeder of another breed, and to tell you the honest truth, if you are getting a puppy from a responsible breeder, that is about the right price I would expect. I sell my puppies, when I have a litter, which only about every other year, for $1200.00.
You need to know that responsible breeders are not making this price up out of their head to make money. The old saying of responsible breeders is that, "If you are making money breeding dogs, you are doing it WRONG!" Responsible breeders do NOT breed to make money. We breed with the goal in mind of improving our breed of choice, and to improve the dogs we breed with every breeding. We do it for the love of our breed.
Pet owners have no clue what it costs us to responsibly breed a littler. For example...First you need to have the dam (the mother) checked for possible problems before the breeding by a vet for parasites, vaginal bacteria, any other possible breed specific hereditary diseases that there are tests for etc. Then there is the breeding fee for the stud dog (my last breeding fee for the stud dog was $800.00). After the breeding, there is the ultrasound to confirm pregnancy, the cost of feeding the pregnant dam (toward the end she is eating double her normal amount with supplements), the x-ray to count how many puppies to expect. If there are problems during the whelping (birth) add the cost of the vet bills for that (a c-section ran me $2000.000). After the puppies are born, you have the food for them once the dam stops nursing, plus she is still eating double her normal amount while nursing for up to 6 weeks. Once the puppies get to a certain age, they need to be wormed, some breeds need dew claw removal at 3 days old, some like mine, need eye checks by a board certified canine opthamologist at 7 weeks old (Around $45 per each puppy in the litter), some breeds need other health checks or proceedures, and then they need their first vaccines. As the puppies grow, they also of course increase the amount they eat, and add in the cost of extra laundry, and cleaning supplies to keep the puppies bedding and puppy area clean. Luckily, I work in a veterinary clinic so my costs are helped out a bit by employee discounts, but at the price of veterinary services these days, look back at all of this and imagine how much it costs a responsible breeder to breed these puppies. Honestly, by the time we sell our puppies at the price you think is too high, we are barely breaking even.
Another thing is that people need to consider that they are spending the money on a FAMILY MEMBER who should be with them for a good 10 years or (hopefully) more. The old saying, "You get what you pay for" very much applies here. Yes, you can get a puppy from a backyard breeder or puppy mill for less money, and end up with tons of problems and no recourse. You may spend over $1000 in the first year just on vet bills for an unhealthy, ill bred puppy who may have ongoing health/temperament problems.
I have nothing against mixed breeds if that is what someone wants. (they ALL need love, mixed breed or purebred) but if someone wants a purebred animal, they need to do their homework, both in what breed SUITS THEM and their lifestyle the best, not what is most popular. There are over 150 different breeds, so there is something for everyone. Responsible breeders are NOT the ones whose animals are ending up in shelters. Some people don't mind mixed breeds and that's fine. Myself, I want a purebred because I have found a breed that suits ME the best. With a purebred you have some predictibility as far as size, temperament, possible health issues et. That is important to me, but maybe not so much to others, in which case a mixed breed is fine for them.
This is why I DO NOT believe in people putting down others for buying purebred animals, or saying nobody should buy an animal when there are animals in shelters. The thing is, if someone has specific needs or wants in an animal that can be met with a purebred, then they should get a purebred. If someone has specific needs or wants in an animal, there is no way to predict that in a mixed breed. If someone has no real issues or needs in a pet and is flexible and able to adapt to the pets size varables, health and temperament variables, coat length/care etc, then a shelter dog is wonderful. BUT, I have seen many dogs end up in shelters because someone bought a breed, or got a mixed breed whose size, coat, temperament, energy level etc ended up not working for their lifestyle, or mesh with their personalities. Then that animal ended up in shelter or a rescue.
The reasons to buy a purebred animals from a responsible breeder (and pay their asking price) are many, but to list a few...they have most likely been involved seriously in their breed for many years and are very knowledgable about the breeds health & temperament issues, they are constantly trying to improve their breed both in conformation and health, they SHOW their dogs, so they have a barometer of how they are doing as far as breeding true to type animals, they give health guarantees, and have return policies (I give a health guarantee, and in my contract it states that if for ANY reason and at ANY time during the dog's life it it can not be kept by the original purchaser, the dog come BACK TO ME, NO questions asked)
If you don't want to go through the puppy stage, then by all means contact a shelter or rescue and look for the purebred of your choice. Just be aware that animals in rescue MAY (not always) have issues such as temperament or health that may be of concern. Some of these issues are minor and can be worked through by training or vet care. The best way to find a responsible breeder, if you want a well bred puppy is to attend a dog show and talk to the people there.
Obviously, as a dog show exhibitor for over 23 years, and a responsible breeder for over 13 years, this is a subject VERY close to my heart, so please excuse the long post. This is just advice/views from a long time dog person, and you are free to take from it what you wish. I'll step down off my soapbox now. :smile:
 
Last edited:
Feb 20, 2008
1,784
5
I'm not at all surprised by the price. I just lost my last Corgi in November, a month shy of his 16th birthday. I believe that I paid $750 for him at the time. Given today's economy, I'd fully expect to pay $1000 to $1250 for a puppy.

In any case, Collie5's post is spot on. Responsible breeders aren't getting rich selling dogs. The costs incurred from breeding and raising healthy puppies as well as the labor involved are substantial. There are a few health issues that are common in Corgis and a good breeder will make every effort to minimize the odds of a puppy being affected by selective breeding and screening - hips, eyes. There's even a dna test now that can screen for degenerative myelopathy. All these things add up. My dogs remained very healthy throughout their lives and I feel a good deal of the credit goes to the breeder. When you think about it, the initial cost of purchasing a puppy are minimal when compared to the costs of keeping that animal healthy for the course of its life.

PS If you haven't already, please check out the Pembroke Welsh Corgi Club of America website. http://www.pembrokecorgi.org/
 

Collie5

Member
Jul 25, 2012
420
2
Northern California
I'm not at all surprised by the price. I just lost my last Corgi in November, a month shy of his 16th birthday. I believe that I paid $750 for him at the time. Given today's economy, I'd fully expect to pay $1000 to $1250 for a puppy.

In any case, Collie5's post is spot on. Responsible breeders aren't getting rich selling dogs. The costs incurred from breeding and raising healthy puppies as well as the labor involved are substantial. There are a few health issues that are common in Corgis and a good breeder will make every effort to minimize the odds of a puppy being affected by selective breeding and screening - hips, eyes. There's even a dna test now that can screen for degenerative myelopathy. All these things add up. My dogs remained very healthy throughout their lives and I feel a good deal of the credit goes to the breeder. When you think about it, the initial cost of purchasing a puppy are minimal when compared to the costs of keeping that animal healthy for the course of its life.


Exactly! Thank you so much! My sympathies on the loss of your Corgi also. I lost my 14 year & 2 month old Collie girl last Spetmeber to old age related problems, and then 7 months later lost her daughter at 12 1/2 years due to a freak thing (aspiration pneumonia). Losing one in a year is bad enough, but losing 2 in 7 months was excruciating.

PS If you haven't already, please check out the Pembroke Welsh Corgi Club of America website. http://www.pembrokecorgi.org/
Excellent suggestion! In fact, if the Corgi Club of America is anything similar to the Collie Club Of America, they keep a list of responsible breeders in every state, and will give referrals to those breeders for people looking for puppies, or even older retired show dogs.
 

sourapril

O.G.
Oct 21, 2006
291
105
vogueandfrugal.blogspot.com
Thank you for taking time to explain that. I may have to wait a little longer to save up for the corgi I want. :smile:


I have to agree. And (warning I'm about to get on my soapbox) I'm a RESPONSIBLE breeder of another breed, and to tell you the honest truth, if you are getting a puppy from a responsible breeder, that is about the right price I would expect. I sell my puppies, when I have a litter, which only about every other year, for $1200.00.
You need to know that responsible breeders are not making this price up out of their head to make money. The old saying of responsible breeders is that, "If you are making money breeding dogs, you are doing it WRONG!" Responsible breeders do NOT breed to make money. We breed with the goal in mind of improving our breed of choice, and to improve the dogs we breed with every breeding. We do it for the love of our breed.
Pet owners have no clue what it costs us to responsibly breed a littler. For example...First you need to have the dam (the mother) checked for possible problems before the breeding by a vet for parasites, vaginal bacteria, any other possible breed specific hereditary diseases that there are tests for etc. Then there is the breeding fee for the stud dog (my last breeding fee for the stud dog was $800.00). After the breeding, there is the ultrasound to confirm pregnancy, the cost of feeding the pregnant dam (toward the end she is eating double her normal amount with supplements), the x-ray to count how many puppies to expect. If there are problems during the whelping (birth) add the cost of the vet bills for that (a c-section ran me $2000.000). After the puppies are born, you have the food for them once the dam stops nursing, plus she is still eating double her normal amount while nursing for up to 6 weeks. Once the puppies get to a certain age, they need to be wormed, some breeds need dew claw removal at 3 days old, some like mine, need eye checks by a board certified canine opthamologist at 7 weeks old (Around $45 per each puppy in the litter), some breeds need other health checks or proceedures, and then they need their first vaccines. As the puppies grow, they also of course increase the amount they eat, and add in the cost of extra laundry, and cleaning supplies to keep the puppies bedding and puppy area clean. Luckily, I work in a veterinary clinic so my costs are helped out a bit by employee discounts, but at the price of veterinary services these days, look back at all of this and imagine how much it costs a responsible breeder to breed these puppies. Honestly, by the time we sell our puppies at the price you think is too high, we are barely breaking even.
Another thing is that people need to consider that they are spending the money on a FAMILY MEMBER who should be with them for a good 10 years or (hopefully) more. The old saying, "You get what you pay for" very much applies here. Yes, you can get a puppy from a backyard breeder or puppy mill for less money, and end up with tons of problems and no recourse. You may spend over $1000 in the first year just on vet bills for an unhealthy, ill bred puppy who may have ongoing health/temperament problems.
I have nothing against mixed breeds if that is what someone wants. (they ALL need love, mixed breed or purebred) but if someone wants a purebred animal, they need to do their homework, both in what breed SUITS THEM and their lifestyle the best, not what is most popular. There are over 150 different breeds, so there is something for everyone. Responsible breeders are NOT the ones whose animals are ending up in shelters. Some people don't mind mixed breeds and that's fine. Myself, I want a purebred because I have found a breed that suits ME the best. With a purebred you have some predictibility as far as size, temperament, possible health issues et. That is important to me, but maybe not so much to others, in which case a mixed breed is fine for them.
This is why I DO NOT believe in people putting down others for buying purebred animals, or saying nobody should buy an animal when there are animals in shelters. The thing is, if someone has specific needs or wants in an animal that can be met with a purebred, then they should get a purebred. If someone has specific needs or wants in an animal, there is no way to predict that in a mixed breed. If someone has no real issues or needs in a pet and is flexible and able to adapt to the pets size varables, health and temperament variables, coat length/care etc, then a shelter dog is wonderful. BUT, I have seen many dogs end up in shelters because someone bought a breed, or got a mixed breed whose size, coat, temperament, energy level etc ended up not working for their lifestyle, or mesh with their personalities. Then that animal ended up in shelter or a rescue.
The reasons to buy a purebred animals from a responsible breeder (and pay their asking price) are many, but to list a few...they have most likely been involved seriously in their breed for many years and are very knowledgable about the breeds health & temperament issues, they are constantly trying to improve their breed both in conformation and health, they SHOW their dogs, so they have a barometer of how they are doing as far as breeding true to type animals, they give health guarantees, and have return policies (I give a health guarantee, and in my contract it states that if for ANY reason and at ANY time during the dog's life it it can not be kept by the original purchaser, the dog come BACK TO ME, NO questions asked)
If you don't want to go through the puppy stage, then by all means contact a shelter or rescue and look for the purebred of your choice. Just be aware that animals in rescue MAY (not always) have issues such as temperament or health that may be of concern. Some of these issues are minor and can be worked through by training or vet care. The best way to find a responsible breeder, if you want a well bred puppy is to attend a dog show and talk to the people there.
Obviously, as a dog show exhibitor for over 23 years, and a responsible breeder for over 13 years, this is a subject VERY close to my heart, so please excuse the long post. This is just advice/views from a long time dog person, and you are free to take from it what you wish. I'll step down off my soapbox now. :smile:
 

Collie5

Member
Jul 25, 2012
420
2
Northern California
Thank you for taking time to explain that. I may have to wait a little longer to save up for the corgi I want. :smile:
You are most welcome!
I know that there is a myth out in the general public that all dog breeders are making tons of money. Most pet owners are just not aware that there are responsible breeders who put their heart and soul into breeding to improve the breeds they love and are not doing it to make money. The other cost I failed to mention in my first post is that when I have a litter, the first two weeks after the puppies are born, I have to take off of work. I either have to use vacation time, or go without pay, as the first two weeks are the most critical and the puppies and their mother can not be left alone all day. I also miss a LOT of sleep! I sleep on an air mattress next to the box to make sure the puppies don't get cold, the Mom doesn't step or lay on them etc. It's a LOT of work, time and money to do it right. It can be incredibly heartbreaking when you lose puppies, the dam or worse yet all of them, but at the same time it's the most rewarding thing I have ever done in my life. The few puppies I have sold have had wonderful homes/families, and I get photos, cards and letters about how wonderful their dog is. I have had a few return later for another puppy.
Good luck finding you next little fur kid! Glad I could help. :smile:
 
Feb 20, 2008
1,784
5
Collie- Thank you for your kind words. I'm so sorry for your losses as well. I miss both of my Corgis terribly. I lost his half sister a year earlier - she was also 16.

OP- Good luck in your search. Corgi's are wonderful little dogs and I'm sure you will find one who melts your heart. It will definitely be worth the wait. :smile:

I'm also searching for a Corgi puppy. I haven't shown dogs since mine were young, so I may as well be starting from scratch. Unfortunately I lost touch with the breeder I got my two from. She went through a rather ugly divorce and had to stop breeding/showing. Right now I'm doing some research trying to find breeders with the same foundation dogs as mine as I really liked their temperament and type.
 

aikoNakamura

Member
Dec 4, 2007
278
0
Price is definitely accurate for purchasing from a breeder. Breeders are always much much more expensive but a good quality breeder really takes care of their pups.

But a less expensive option as a lot of the other posters have said is to look into shelters and rescue centers. You would really be helping a little guy out. Hope all goes well in your search. Definitely call around the local shelters or breed specific rescue centers.