Pit Bull rescue in Northern Cali?

grayxie

NOMtacular!
Mar 28, 2008
5,565
5
PA
I have a friend in the No. Cal area who is looking to rehome his young female pit, and would like to go through a breed specific rescue since most shelters have their own policies on pits. She was originally adopted from a shelter, is mostly potty trained, and understands some basic commands. The reason they are rehoming is that she chases their cats, and their other dog is really not pleased with her being around. They are working on her "mouthy" issue, but otherwise a very sweet dog. With a baby on the way, and renovations for their future home they don't foresee getting the training under wraps before the baby is born. They will keep her until they find a good, suitable home for her, so no worries on her ending up in a shelter again. So if anyone knows a rescue that could help that would be much appreciated, and I will pass on the info to my friend.

Attached is a pic, her name is Olive.
 

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chessmont

O.G.
Aug 22, 2006
12,111
1,844
CA
There is a group, "BADRAP" in the SF Bay Area. I don't know if they are specifically a rescue, or an advocacy group, but they ought to be able to send you in the right direction. I don't have a URL, but I'm sure if you google them, you'll find them. They evaluated and placed some of Michael Vick's dogs into good foster and permanent homes, in the Bay Area.
 

AmberGretchen

Member
Jan 3, 2007
146
0
Northern California
Your friend should try badrap, but should also know that most pits that end up in shelters are put to sleep, because there is such a huge overpopulation.

I'm sure their willingness to foster the dog until a new home could be found would help, but honestly, why couldn't they at least try a little bit harder to work with a trainer and/or behavioralist to see if they can fix this on their own. I'm sure they are busy and overwhelmed, but the problems you describe are all ones that can be solved/overcome by training, and with the many many unwanted pits in the world, I really don't see how someone could ethically add to their numbers without having put in a 110% effort to make it work.
 

chessmont

O.G.
Aug 22, 2006
12,111
1,844
CA
Your friend should try badrap, but should also know that most pits that end up in shelters are put to sleep, because there is such a huge overpopulation.

I'm sure their willingness to foster the dog until a new home could be found would help, but honestly, why couldn't they at least try a little bit harder to work with a trainer and/or behavioralist to see if they can fix this on their own. I'm sure they are busy and overwhelmed, but the problems you describe are all ones that can be solved/overcome by training, and with the many many unwanted pits in the world, I really don't see how someone could ethically add to their numbers without having put in a 110% effort to make it work.
-In theory I can agree, but I can address at least one point from personal experience; I have had dogs who, no matter what, in my 20 years of experience, and with trainers, etc., could not live together no way no how. To the death was their motto, I am not kidding.

'If that is the case one needs to be rehomed.

It isn't always possible to fix all the problems mentioned. Theoretically speaking.
 

grayxie

NOMtacular!
Mar 28, 2008
5,565
5
PA
Keeping pets together that don't get along is basically a family holiday dinner fight every day.