Coach Rehab and Rescue Club

Nov 6, 2020
322
1,079
She had been given the full treatment by a cobbler
Such a shame... you would think a cobbler would know better. :sad:
I have learned the hard way that not all cobblers know what they are doing. As with any profession, some are good, some are bad.
Same here. I took a bag to a cobbler once to get color refreshed. He just applied shoe polish all over and turned my bag orange because he failed to color match the red miserably.
I was thinking of taking my bags to the cobbler to get torn handles and other strap reinforcements done but after reading this... I think I might have to crank our sewing machine out and learn to do it myself... :eek::hrmm: lest I get a handful of shoe polished bags back, haha.
 

pammbw

O.G.
Nov 7, 2007
208
861
I was thinking of taking my bags to the cobbler to get torn handles and other strap reinforcements done but after reading this... I think I might have to crank our sewing machine out and learn to do it myself... :eek::hrmm: lest I get a handful of shoe polished bags back, haha.
Unfortunately the two times I have taken bags to a leather repair shop and a cobbler shop I have been disappointed. The work was subpar. I would definitely do a lot of research and get references before dropping bags off for repair.
 

pammbw

O.G.
Nov 7, 2007
208
861
Hello all. Looking for recommendations on how to clean up this baby. Finally have some time this weekend to work on her!
A few years ago I bought a 75th anniversary willis like yours off shopgoodwill. It was the vacetta color, and it had denim transfer stains on the back. I was able to get the bag clean by just using first a damp cloth and wiping it down, then using leather cleaner. I stuffed it for shaping and conditioned it a few times with CPR. That should be all you need to do with that modern leather. Is the lining clean?
 

Kitana0808

Member
Jun 9, 2019
85
36
A few years ago I bought a 75th anniversary willis like yours off shopgoodwill. It was the vacetta color, and it had denim transfer stains on the back. I was able to get the bag clean by just using first a damp cloth and wiping it down, then using leather cleaner. I stuffed it for shaping and conditioned it a few times with CPR. That should be all you need to do with that modern leather. Is the lining clean?
Thanks!
The lining had little dirt marks nothing major..I managed it get it off with a damp cloth & dish soap...i did gently wipe it with leather cleaner..most came off but still has a little residue.
 
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Kitana0808

Member
Jun 9, 2019
85
36
Don't rub hard. No scrubbing. Gentle cleaning. Remove the stains in little bits at a time. That gray color leather is basically on the surface of the leather. If you scrub you will rub it off.
Yea i notice the gray color is delicate some has already rubbed off on the handle if you can tell...im always scare to dye bags because it must be hard to match colors but I may need to do that here.
 
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katev

"The Bag Whisperer!"
O.G.
Dec 18, 2009
15,491
10,874
I was thinking of taking my bags to the cobbler to get torn handles and other strap reinforcements done but after reading this... I think I might have to crank our sewing machine out and learn to do it myself... :eek::hrmm: lest I get a handful of shoe polished bags back, haha.

I've had mixed experiences with cobblers but then I found a good one. He is not the cheapest but he is knowledgeble and honest. He fixed the frame on my Bonnie Cashin Kisslock Bag, he advised against trying to have a strap made for my caviar leather Gracie, and he repaired a tear and damage to a mahogany Patricia's Legacy. Since then he's done a lot of other things for me to repair shoes and accessories. I'm just worried that he might decide to retire!

If it's something that you can't repair yourself, then I think you need to shop around and ask questions. If the cobbler's answers are sound then just take a chance, but that's easiet to do when you didn't pay much for the item.
 
Last edited:
Nov 6, 2020
322
1,079
Thanks - I had a big bacon lunch to get my vim and vigour up and then absolutely attacked it in the sink with lots and lots of Fairy. I'm going completely ham on it now. I suds up and scrub, leave it for a while, rinse and repeat. It's bubbled up in the sink right now. My right arm and hand is going to be achinggg tomorrow! Haha

How much of your city was covered?

ETA: leaving it soaking for a bit after the final scrub. It feels very soft and pliable while wet compared to my initial dunk upon receiving it so fingers crossed I've made actual progress after all those products and the elbow grease!
Let myself down by being optimistic. Nothing really changed and it only got worse. Piping and handle are parched, weird small brown specks, and the worst thing is it completely REEKS of the Renomat! Stinking up my bedroom and I don't want to put it in the boiler room to speed up the drying (hoping the smell will leave by way of evaporation or something) because our freshly washed clothes are in there. Think I'll put it on my window sill above the radiator and then leave it outside tomorrow. We're supposed to have some sun. Sigh!!! So much £ wasted.
 

Lake Effect

Member
Feb 25, 2017
5,520
17,232
The Garden State
I've had mixed experiences with cobblers but then I found a good one. He is not the cheapest but he is knowledgeble and honest. He fixed the frame on my Bonnie Cashin Kisslock Bag, he advised against trying to have a strap made for my caviar leather Gracie, and he repaired a tear and damage to a mahogany Patricia's Legacy. Since then he's done a lot of other things for me to repair shoes and accessories. I'm just worried that he might decide to retire!

If it's something that you can't repair yourself, then I think you need to shop around and ask questions. If the cobbler's answers are sound then just take a chance, but that's easiet to do when you didn't pay much for the item.
I would love to have the piping replaced on this Shoulder Purse and read online about this local guy who repairs wood and leather, specializing in furniture repair. He said he replaces zippers on jackets and bag so I think he is a shoo-in for piping, if he can source the leather. I may shoot him an email this weekend.
 

whateve

Authenticator
O.G.
May 10, 2010
59,762
65,999
I would love to have the piping replaced on this Shoulder Purse and read online about this local guy who repairs wood and leather, specializing in furniture repair. He said he replaces zippers on jackets and bag so I think he is a shoe in for piping, if he can source the leather. I may shoot him an email this weekend.
I imagine it would cost a fortune! Once I asked a guy about replacing a zipper in a basic bag. The brass zipper was $35 and the labor was $70, IIRC.
 

Lake Effect

Member
Feb 25, 2017
5,520
17,232
The Garden State
I imagine it would cost a fortune! Once I asked a guy about replacing a zipper in a basic bag. The brass zipper was $35 and the labor was $70, IIRC.
Well, I don’t want to pay a fortune, but it is my little kisslock Shoulder Purse :heart: It's kind of a well worn putty, so burgundy would be a cool contrast. Since I want to downsize, I could rationalize a repair vs. purchase!

And just say, if, big if, he can do it for an affordable fee and he’s good, he might be able to help me customizing.