Hermes Cafe Bon Temps~Good Times Cafe

eagle1002us

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Jun 9, 2007
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Oh my! Poor baby. I got teary eyes watching that.
It's really touching. His paw over his eyes might be b/c the clinic has bright light but also because (in a human way) he's revealing how traumatized he is. When presented with a stand-in for his mum he just gloms onto the teddy, like he's trying to merge with it, become a part of it. That is sad but also beautiful to see. This video was made during the Black Summer of Australian bushfires in 2019. I am so glad joeys can accept a teddy to comfort them when the mum is gone.
 
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eagle1002us

Fashion and Cupcakes
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Jun 9, 2007
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Thank you very much, @eagle1002us! Working today was most pleasurable as I was admiring my ring the whole time (and not getting much work done). :biggrin:

You’re so knowledgeable on the design! It is Tyger Tyger. I’ll have to do a trivia for you every once in a while. I was looking at the shawl when I found it yesterday and wondering to myself what is the name??? Figured it must include something tiger in it. Lol. I took a quick snap. It was a little chilly in the house and no sun today. Good thing I found my shawl. :smile:

View attachment 5067626
I wrote and read a lot for my job. I got much more mileage out of looking at whatever rings and bracelets I was wearing than necklaces and earrings.

However, when I made a necklace that complemented a scarf or dress I was generally happier with it than a commercial necklace. I am not sure where my necklace for Tyger Tyger went to -- "It's around here somewhere" is one of the mottos of my life -- but when I find it or the tpf mod shot I did way back when I'll post it.
 

Fabfashion

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It's really touching. His paw over his eyes might be b/c the clinic has bright light but also because (in a human way) he's revealing how traumatized he is. When presented with a stand-in for his mum he just gloms onto the teddy, like he's trying to merge with it, become a part of it. That is sad but also beautiful to see. This video was made during the Black Summer of Australian bushfires in 2019. I am so glad joeys can accept a teddy to comfort them when the mum is gone.
I was afraid to ask what happened to his mum. Hopefully, he found some comfort in the teddy. Nothing could substitute for his mum but it seems he has a lot of people who love him. Do the rescue organization eventually release these orphans back to the wild?
 

eagle1002us

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Jun 9, 2007
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I was afraid to ask what happened to his mum. Hopefully, he found some comfort in the teddy. Nothing could substitute for his mum but it seems he has a lot of people who love him. Do the rescue organization eventually release these orphans back to the wild?
Yes, absolutely. I guess it's one thing if a koala like the 3-footed koala named Triumph is raised in a sanctuary from the get go but it's another if a koala accustomed to the wild spends a prolonged time in a facility when the animal is actually quite well. Koalas are such fragile beings. They can get depressed and die from longing for the outdoors (unless there's a big heat wave). When they've healed they get a little antsy just like a person would if they're stuck at home for two years b/c of Covid. :shocked: That's why rescue organizations emphasize that their priority is to rescue, rehabilitate and release. (I do think koalas have a unique emotional intensity on a continuum with humans). Australia has strict laws that koalas are not pets.

I think the 1st 6 months of life are limited to the mum's pouch, afterwards the koala gradually ventures out so that the mum can teach her how to survive in the wilderness (they sniff every eucalypt leaf to get the ones that have the highest water content and the least toxins). The koala learns how to climb from mum. Otherwise, the carer in a facility will somehow or other help the koala to be confident when hanging from skinny branches, etc. In the wild, the koala will start clinging to Mum's fur until it's too heavy to schlep around. By then it can survive on its own and Mum moves away on her own. Usually by that time she has a new joey in her pouch so she's got hormones telling her to change her priorities.
 
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Fabfashion

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Yes, absolutely. I guess it's one thing if a koala like the 3-footed koala named Triumph is raised in a sanctuary from the get go but it's another if a koala accustomed to the wild spends a prolonged time in a facility when the animal is actually quite well. Koalas are such fragile beings. They can get depressed and die from longing for the outdoors (unless there's a big heat wave). When they've healed they get a little antsy just like a person would if they're stuck at home for two years b/c of Covid. :shocked: That's why rescue organizations emphasize that their priority is to rescue, rehabilitate and release. (I do think koalas have a unique emotional intensity on a continuum with humans). Australia has strict laws that koalas are not pets.

I think the 1st 6 months of life are limited to the mum's pouch, afterwards the koala gradually ventures out so that the mum can teach her how to survive in the wilderness (they sniff every eucalypt leaf to get the ones that have the highest water content and the least toxins). The koala learns how to climb from mum. Otherwise, the carer in a facility will somehow or other help the koala to be confident when hanging from skinny branches, etc. In the wild, the koala will start clinging to Mum's fur until it's too heavy to schlep around. By then it can survive on its own and Mum moves away on her own. Usually by that time she has a new joey in her pouch so she's got hormones telling her to change her priorities.
I‘m so glad that there are rescue organizations to help these koalas. In some ways it’s a little worrisome because they seem so fragile and can’t defend themselves. How did they manage to escape the predators in the old days (100s of years ago) before the modern days with rescues? Sorry I don’t know much about koalas and their habitat. I work a lot with natural resources organization here but am only familiar with wildlife in Ontario. I know koalas don’t move very fast. In my province, there are a lot of predators like black bears, polar bears, wolves, coyotes, eagles, etc. so I don’t think koalas will be able to fend off these predators if they live here. I’m glad they’re well taken care of in Australia and hopefully can recover from the fires of 2019/2020. They’re too precious.
 
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Fabfashion

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I wrote and read a lot for my job. I got much more mileage out of looking at whatever rings and bracelets I was wearing than necklaces and earrings.

However, when I made a necklace that complemented a scarf or dress I was generally happier with it than a commercial necklace. I am not sure where my necklace for Tyger Tyger went to -- "It's around here somewhere" is one of the mottos of my life -- but when I find it or the tpf mod shot I did way back when I'll post it.
Do you have other necklaces that you made that you can share pics? When I was in university, one of my friends was showing us girls how to make necklaces and earrings. I made a choker with 3 strands of faux pearls and put an antique brooch in the centre. I know I have it somewhere in the house but no idea where it is. That was my one and only attempt at jewelry making. :biggrin:

I meant to ask about your full silver CDC. Is it comfortable to wear? I often wonder if it’s heavy as it looks substantial. I’m sure it looks amazing on your wrist.
 

eagle1002us

Fashion and Cupcakes
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Jun 9, 2007
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The colorway you described sounds so pretty. Please share pic. Mine is lavande and orange. I particularly like lavender color and wish I can find more clothing in that shade. You made a necklace? What did it look like and what materials did you use? You’re so creative!

I have the world’s smallest closet. I think someone with a tiny wardrobe designed my house. In the master bedroom we have 2 closets, one is about 5’ x 5’ and another small one that’s about 3.5’ x 2’. It was almost an afterthought! Anyhow, I used to store all my H scarves and shawls in their boxes and none would get worn because out of sight out of mind. I ended up getting over the door towel bars and hung it on the inside of my small closet’s door. I hung all my CSGMs there. The Tyger Tyger was somewhat hidden behind another CSGM; hence, the discovery the other day plus I don’t use this closet very much. Now that I remember they’re there, I’ll shop my closet more often.

At lease now you’re ready for summer and Xmas. Way to go!
Think about getting a lavender amethyst ring. Just a single impressive stone. It'll be quartz so the price point and the wearability will be good. I like lavender, too. All shades of mauve are good, I like the deep mauves especially.. There are H scarves in this colorway. The H Secret Garden 90cm comes in medium mauve, it's a vintage floral. Might not be your style . . .
Do you have other necklaces that you made that you can share pics? When I was in university, one of my friends was showing us girls how to make necklaces and earrings. I made a choker with 3 strands of faux pearls and put an antique brooch in the centre. I know I have it somewhere in the house but no idea where it is. That was my one and only attempt at jewelry making. :biggrin:

I meant to ask about your full silver CDC. Is it comfortable to wear? I often wonder if it’s heavy as it looks substantial. I’m sure it looks amazing on your wrist.
It's fine. I got the right size so it wasn't too tight, it was comfortable. It's a pretty striking look.
 

eagle1002us

Fashion and Cupcakes
O.G.
Jun 9, 2007
7,704
8,260
Do you have other necklaces that you made that you can share pics? When I was in university, one of my friends was showing us girls how to make necklaces and earrings. I made a choker with 3 strands of faux pearls and put an antique brooch in the centre. I know I have it somewhere in the house but no idea where it is. That was my one and only attempt at jewelry making. :biggrin:

I meant to ask about your full silver CDC. Is it comfortable to wear? I often wonder if it’s heavy as it looks substantial. I’m sure it looks amazing on your wrist.
I like chunky bracelets, a bunch of silver bangles, mostly Jensen, those are enjoyable to wear. I don't feel the weight. Certainly not with the CDC b/c it encircles the wrist so the weight such as it is is balanced.
 

eagle1002us

Fashion and Cupcakes
O.G.
Jun 9, 2007
7,704
8,260
I took some silversmithing classes, introductory, at the Art League, but I learned fairly quickly that I was much better (that is, it was much easier) to do beading rather than making a wax mold to be cast. The latter is sculptural, 3D, so it's harder (for me).

Did not like soldering. There are fumes from that and the darkening solution, liver of sulfur, is pretty pungent. The local guy doesn't want to do what he calls "antiquing" -- darkening the silver to highlight aspects of the chassed or repousse design -- probably b/c the stuff is pungent.

Cutting metal with a jeweler's saw was ok, now I know what handmade jewelry looks like. The classes were probably worth it for that.

I really prefer sewing if I've going to be working in a 3D context.
 
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eagle1002us

Fashion and Cupcakes
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Jun 9, 2007
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I‘m so glad that there are rescue organizations to help these koalas. In some ways it’s a little worrisome because they seem so fragile and can’t defend themselves. How did they manage to escape the predators in the old days (100s of years ago) before the modern days with rescues? Sorry I don’t know much about koalas and their habitat. I work a lot with natural resources organization here but am only familiar with wildlife in Ontario. I know koalas don’t move very fast. In my province, there are a lot of predators like black bears, polar bears, wolves, coyotes, eagles, etc. so I don’t think koalas will be able to fend off these predators if they live here. I’m glad they’re well taken care of in Australia and hopefully can recover from the fires of 2019/2020. They’re too precious.
IMO the worst predator of all has been hunters. It's my understanding that in the late 1880s to around the 1920s, koalas were hunted for their pelts which supposedly made clothing rain resistant. Millions died and of course that kind of population size is long gone, impossible to recover from such carnage. Thankfully President Hubert Hoover put a ban on the koala skin trade, this might have been when he was working for the Dept. of Commerce. The guy doesn't necessarily get any kudos in the US b/c he didn't stop the financial chaos that become the worldwide Great Depression. Well, the guy gets kudos in my book for banning the koala trade -- the hundreds of pelts collected in a hunt would make you (and me) sick -- there are pictures. Anyhow, economists generally say WWII ended the Depression. So, we're good again! :smile:

Well, habitat loss and the stress that causes fosters disease in koalas, notably chlamydia and my understanding is that there is also a koala retrovirus. I've read of autopsies in koalas where the cause of death is this, that, and the other thing. Before I got into koalas I did not realize how animals can suffer from concurrent conditions b/c habitat loss makes them, well, nervous wrecks. One day your home's there and the next day somebody chopped it (and lots of others) down to build a motel. I've seen pictures of how koalas get dazed and confused looking for a tree that's just flat-out disappeared. Multiply that situation across the Country and it's just not good.
 
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