Books & Music "You have to read this!": Books to Press on Others

LADC_chick

African violet
Dec 13, 2009
5,545
3
The District
What books have you read, and either as you're reading it or after you've read it, you couldn't stop talking about it? To the point that you passed the book on to a friend or family member, or you went out and bought a copy for the person(s)?

This thread is different than both the favorite authors/books and "currently reading" thread. The book doesn't have to be by a favorite author or one that you're currently reading; simply, a book that you enjoyed so much, you wanted other people to enjoy it also. I also think that this thread can be an offshoot of the book review thread because you can include chatter about why a book affected you to the point that you wanted others to read it.

For me, I read Sarah's Key by Tatiana de Rosnay earlier this year, and I had to slow myself down otherwise I would have devoured it the same day. I told anyone who would listen about it. Normally, I'm not big on books (or movies) about the Holocaust because it can be too much for me to take, but this book was filled with flawed yet sympathetic characters. I also think that de Rosnay has a way with words, which immediately drew me into the story.
 

katran26

Bargain Hunter!
O.G.
Aug 25, 2008
6,263
152
Great thread!!

I personally love The Secret History by Donna Tartt; it's a very unconventional topic - a bunch of Classics students try to re-enact Dionysian rituals in the woods in Vermont - but Tartt's writing style, character development, and plot are all superb!
 

babypie

Member
Jun 3, 2007
18,914
2
In the Lake of the Woods by Tim O’Brien is a book I first read 12-15 years ago. Over the years I’ve read it a couple more times and it remains the most haunting book I’ve ever read. Filled with hypothesis about a man’s wife who went missing “What if she ran away, what if he killed her, what if this, what if that” It’s about loss, loneliness, mental illness, childhood abuse, the casualties of war…it’s just an incredibly creative and creepy book about the complete uncertainty of life. The writing is beautiful and painful and the imagery is so vivid I swear I can still picture certain scenes in my head even though it’s been years since I last read it.
 

babypie

Member
Jun 3, 2007
18,914
2
What books have you read, and either as you're reading it or after you've read it, you couldn't stop talking about it? To the point that you passed the book on to a friend or family member, or you went out and bought a copy for the person(s)?

This thread is different than both the favorite authors/books and "currently reading" thread. The book doesn't have to be by a favorite author or one that you're currently reading; simply, a book that you enjoyed so much, you wanted other people to enjoy it also. I also think that this thread can be an offshoot of the book review thread because you can include chatter about why a book affected you to the point that you wanted others to read it.

For me, I read Sarah's Key by Tatiana de Rosnay earlier this year, and I had to slow myself down otherwise I would have devoured it the same day. I told anyone who would listen about it. Normally, I'm not big on books (or movies) about the Holocaust because it can be too much for me to take, but this book was filled with flawed yet sympathetic characters. I also think that de Rosnay has a way with words, which immediately drew me into the story.
Just added this to my amazon wishlist :smile:
 

LisaG719

Living life...
O.G.
Jun 16, 2006
7,358
65
Oregon
Great thread! Shutter Island by Dennis Lehane was one of those books that after I read it I wanted everyone to read it. But, now that the movie has been released I'm sure the twisted story plot is fairly well known.
 

mrb4bags

Member
Nov 11, 2007
1,258
0
New Jersey
In the Lake of the Woods by Tim O’Brien is a book I first read 12-15 years ago. Over the years I’ve read it a couple more times and it remains the most haunting book I’ve ever read. Filled with hypothesis about a man’s wife who went missing “What if she ran away, what if he killed her, what if this, what if that” It’s about loss, loneliness, mental illness, childhood abuse, the casualties of war…it’s just an incredibly creative and creepy book about the complete uncertainty of life. The writing is beautiful and painful and the imagery is so vivid I swear I can still picture certain scenes in my head even though it’s been years since I last read it.
I read this book after reading your recommendation and have to agree with you that it is one the most haunting books. It is beautifully written, descriptive and spell binding.
 

madamefifi

cat hoarder
O.G.
Aug 23, 2006
5,813
734
virginia
Restoration by Rose Tremain--just gorgeous. A movie was made of this book but it didn't even come close.
What Is The What by Dave Eggers
The Crimson Petal and the White by Michel Faber--I'm actually not sure why I love this book so much but I've read it a couple of times and "made" my husband read it, too.
Life of Pi by Yann Martel--yeah, I know. People either loved this or hated it.
 
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Tangerine

Layered.Like nachos.
O.G.
Jan 16, 2007
4,211
0
35
California
Someone told me to read The Book Thief by Markus Zusak, now I do the same! I'm so, so rarely floored by books.. I dunno it just takes a lot to get to me when it comes to simple words on a page, but this one is great for sure.
 

GirlFriday

Member
Mar 30, 2008
4,112
0
I really recommend Lonesome Dove to anybody who hasn't read it. I never thought I would read a Western novel, but I don't think I've been so emotionally invested in the characters of a book. I actually missed the story and the characters when the book ended, and it's a long book.

Another fiction book I really recommend is A Thousand Acres by Jane Smiley. Something about this book that I really loved.

BTW, great idea for a thread!
 

LADC_chick

African violet
Dec 13, 2009
5,545
3
The District
In the Lake of the Woods by Tim O’Brien is a book I first read 12-15 years ago. Over the years I’ve read it a couple more times and it remains the most haunting book I’ve ever read. Filled with hypothesis about a man’s wife who went missing “What if she ran away, what if he killed her, what if this, what if that” It’s about loss, loneliness, mental illness, childhood abuse, the casualties of war…it’s just an incredibly creative and creepy book about the complete uncertainty of life. The writing is beautiful and painful and the imagery is so vivid I swear I can still picture certain scenes in my head even though it’s been years since I last read it.
Tim O'Brien is the military vet turned author, right? I remember having to read a short story by him in college, and I was very hesitant. I've always been hesitant about military stories to begin with, but I think within the past year or so, I've opened to the idea of them. Anyway, I went to Amazon and I read the book description; now I think I have to add this book to my list!
 

LisaG719

Living life...
O.G.
Jun 16, 2006
7,358
65
Oregon
Someone told me to read The Book Thief by Markus Zusak, now I do the same! I'm so, so rarely floored by books.. I dunno it just takes a lot to get to me when it comes to simple words on a page, but this one is great for sure.
+1 Great book!

Another fiction book I really recommend is A Thousand Acres by Jane Smiley. Something about this book that I really loved.
I read that and started out thinking that I wouldn't like it. I was pleasantly surprised.

Another suggestion to add to the list The World Without Us by Alan Weisman. I remember being astounding by some of the things I learned by reading it.

Oh and I almost forgot about Suite Francaise by Irene Nemirovsky. Amazing and poignant.
 

babypie

Member
Jun 3, 2007
18,914
2
Tim O'Brien is the military vet turned author, right? I remember having to read a short story by him in college, and I was very hesitant. I've always been hesitant about military stories to begin with, but I think within the past year or so, I've opened to the idea of them. Anyway, I went to Amazon and I read the book description; now I think I have to add this book to my list!
Yes he's a vet. I know what you mean, I'm generally not too interested in war books as I find them bogged down by detail and military lingo, but this book is so different.