Workplace When do you give up on waiting for a job offer?

kirsten

O.G.
May 9, 2006
7,394
100
41
OC, California
I had two interviews recently that I thought went pretty well. I was qualified for the positions, the interviews were long, and a lot was discussed. Unfortunately I was the first interviewee for both positions and I was told they would need to interview some other candidates. Both positions seemed to be immediate hires, but as of today the positions are still posted, and I haven't heard anything back on them despite following up. They both called me immediately after receiving my resume, scheduled the interviews for the next day and then nothing!

Position #1: I interviewed Feb 9th; over two weeks ago. I was told they would have a decision in a week. I patiently waited and heard nothing. I emailed the HR rep the following Friday just expressing my interest in the position and asking for an update. She never replied. The next day I then emailed basically the same thing to the hiring manager but reworded. HM and HR obviously talked because HR then called me about 15 minutes later and told me they were still interviewing candidates. She seemed kind of cranky and defensive. The hiring manager had been out of the office a couple days so they were running behind. She told me it would be another week most likely - which would have made it a week yesterday. She told me she would let me know "either way." How many times do you hear that though?

Position #2: I was told they would make a decision in about a week. A week passed and I sent an email following up and heard nothing back. This position is still posted so I am guessing they are running behind on the interviews and choosing a candidate as well. I haven't followed up again since I don't want to come across as a pest.

It has been over 6 years since I last did this interviewing process. I guess I am being impatient and it is really stressing me out because I would really like both jobs - especially position 1! Any tips on what I should do next? Should I follow up again being that a week has passed and I haven't heard back, or should I just lay low a little more?

I really hate how most jobs will not get back to you if you are no longer being considered for the position or they hired someone already. It seems to be way too common now days and it seems to rub me the wrong way. Employers aren't the only ones going out of their way; interviewers are too! Even a quick "sorry, but no" email would be appreciated but it seems so common for employers to just leaving you hanging with no response back at all. :sad:

Also I am still looking for other jobs in the meantime.
 

ms-whitney

shopaholic
Sep 6, 2006
5,935
5
This is just me, and I'm a pretty straight forward, blunt type of person

I wouldn't call and/email more then once if at all..because they do talk to each other HR and the hiring manager..

In my past experience if your résumé makes enough of an impact it'll get you through the door, then you'd have to make an impact in person.

And trust that if they're interested they'd get back to you, that they won't forget you unless you're out of the running..if you are they'll simply just stop communicating unless their first choice doesn't work out--that's just the way it works unfortunately, they won't call and tell you bad news, only if its good

I don't know how much of an impact that anxiety caused; some companies hire immediately, some will put you through hoops that if lucky, is a week or so, if not a month which in between time you wait while they interview other candidates, background checks, so forth

I never really wait past the time they expect first day of work to be, if not then I'd wait a week and simply write it off, all the while interviewing
 

kirsten

O.G.
May 9, 2006
7,394
100
41
OC, California
I just noticed position 1 postings have been removed. I guess it's now filled. :sad: Of course I was never notified "either way" which I was expecting really. Those words seem to be the kiss of death.

And yeah I agree with above. They were so quick to get me in for an interview, and if they aren't offering me the job in a day or two, it probably didn't work out. Why would they let the perfect candidate "walk" where I could accept other job offers. It is an employers market though.
 

juneping

couch potato-ing
O.G.
Jun 11, 2007
17,802
917
NYC
for all the offers i got my entire working life....i think i got the offers mostly the same day, a couple the day after. i usually gave up hope after a week.
i suggest sending a thank you email right after the interviews and re-state your interests/skills and looking forward to hearing from them blah blah...
i wish you the best of luck!!

oh trust me on the rejecting email...they're just as annoying as waiting for an answer. when i got those kind of rejecting emails/letters...i told myself: what a waste of my time to open it and get rejected...:lol:
 
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bnjj

Jovi Junkie
O.G.
Apr 20, 2007
10,215
17
Bon Jovi Blvd.
Some places are totally flaky and don't 'let you know either way' even when they say the will.

You never know what has come up within the company though so I would give a company the benefit of the doubt if they are not heard back from right away. Internal things can come up that delay the process. Sometimes they are torn between two candidates and don't want to make a rush decisions. Sometimes they are trying to reach references. Often, they have an offer out to another candidate and you don't hear back as quickly as that person is taking time to get back to them for whatever reason.

I ALWAYS send a follow up thank you letter if I remain interested in a position after interviewing. If I don't hear back by the time they said I would, I follow up by phone. Once. I CANNOT stress enough how important a thank you letter is if you remain interested in the role. I thought everyone sent them but I have been told that the follow up letters I have sent were significant in the decision to offer me the job. Last year I was told that my follow up letter "spoke to my business style".

Think of it this way - if there is you and another candidate and you both have pretty much what they are looking for in a candidate - maybe you excel in one area but the other person has some other advantage that you don't have - if only one of you sends a thank you letter, that person is going to stand out.

Leaving a posting up does not always mean they are still looking. It could just mean they are delayed in removing the posting for whatever reason.

Don't let these flaky companies that never get back to you get you down.
 
Sep 17, 2009
1,140
4
I ALWAYS send a follow up thank you letter if I remain interested in a position after interviewing. If I don't hear back by the time they said I would, I follow up by phone. Once. I CANNOT stress enough how important a thank you letter is if you remain interested in the role. I thought everyone sent them but I have been told that the follow up letters I have sent were significant in the decision to offer me the job. Last year I was told that my follow up letter "spoke to my business style".
I agree with this. I think a thank you note is always important (or even a thank you email, depending on how formal or informal the company is). However, depending again on what your field is, I would NEVER call to check up on my interview. Especially if you've sent a thank you note after the interview reaffirming your interest in the position, I think you risk bugging or annoying the individuals in charge of the hiring process. If they want you for the position, they will contact you, and if they don't or are on the fence, I don't think phoning them to ask them when they are going to make a decision is going to make them suddenly decide you are their choice.

But, that may just be because we were always taught in the legal field to never, under any circumstance, call about an interview because pestering people who are busy isn't going to make someone want to hire you. So perhaps this is not true across all fields.
 

kirsten

O.G.
May 9, 2006
7,394
100
41
OC, California
I usually do send a thank you email after the interview, however unfortunately I didn't for position 1 because I interviewed late on a Friday and was going to on Monday but it totally slipped my mind. That was my first interview in over 6 years. I sent a thank you email to position 2 a few hours after.

As for the follow up it was just by email. Both hiring managers (despite having hr departments) gave me their contact info stating to call them if I had any questions. Position 1 even gave me his cell number. I never called, just emailed and it was pretty much just restating my interest for the position. I won't do that again though.

Position 2 I still haven't heard anything back on and the job was reposted again today. :sad:
 
Jun 8, 2006
1,813
802
You sound like me! I do follow up with the thank you email, though. Sometimes you don't know if there is someone else on the inside. I hate being the first in line or the first presenter or the first performer. It has happened to me three times. That is a tough spot to be in. I will tell you this: it is significant that you are getting in the door. It is very hard to manage that. So you have that part down. Now I guess you go over the what went on in the interview and ask people who really know about these things. It's very hard out there.
 

kirsten

O.G.
May 9, 2006
7,394
100
41
OC, California
It is tough out there! It is a way different economy than before when I last needed a job (6 years ago). I guess I have been pretty lucky to always get hired at 80% of the jobs I've interviewed at in the past, only not getting hired if I bomb it hard and I am always aware of it. I can't help but overanalyze what might have gone wrong now.

Sadly I still have some hope left I might get one of those jobs. I realize I didn't get the mail yet this week and thought maybe there if an offer (like they wouldn't call), so I ran to go get it but nope nothing.

Now I have no other interviews lined up. I sent two resumes in today for companies I'd love to work at though so I'm hoping they call!
 

jpgoeth

Shopinator
Jul 6, 2007
2,766
1
Another thing to consider is that at some companies advertising and interviewing for a position has nothing to do with their want to fill it. For example, at one company I worked at one of my direct reports left. I really needed someone to replace them as the other 3 in that group were already stretched too thin. So my boss and HR OK'd a new hire and had me go through all the work/drama of reviewing resumes, phone interviews, in person interviews, and reference checks only to never OK a hire, internal or external. My boss knew I would leave (which I did, after 3 long cycles of interviewing) if they didn't get me a replacement but also wanted his numbers to look better for bonus time. So he strung me along for as long as he possibly could.

Point is, some (many?) companies post positions that they have no intention of filling. Some companies also have a policy of publicly posting a position and interviewing for it even if an internal candidate already "has" the job. It's really unfair to the interviewees, who take time off from work, might have to buy appropriate interview attire, spend time preparing, etc. etc.
 

Gremlin

Member
Oct 25, 2012
879
1
Australia
Don't give up Kirsten! The fact that you are getting called in for interviews is a good sign.

How are you doing now? Any more interviews?
 

rainbowrose

Member
Oct 27, 2012
164
0
Australia
Honestly just stop thinking about it. I have had interviews and then never heard a thing back and have found it extremely rude but have learned to just stop stressing over it. Apply for more jobs. Maybe follow up once but if you're going to get the job they'll give it to you and will let you know.

But an actual answer, I usually give up around a week later...and definitely all hope vanished 2 weeks later.
 

Northergirl

Member
Jun 6, 2009
1,017
1
Canada
I applied for my current job last June, did the interview in Sept, they offered me the job at the end of Nov, and I just started the a few weeks ago.

Be patient. I know it's hard, but hiring for some companies does take a very long time. I was lucky as I was already working full time when I applied for the new job. For a lot of companies they have processes they need to go through first which can take months such as referance checks, back ground checks, etc. Meanwhile don't email them anymore and continue looking at other jobs.
Good luck!