Workplace What would you choose?

ap.

O.G.
Oct 20, 2008
4,328
2,047
I would look at management: what is their style, do you like the decisions they make, do you like how they make decisions, how do they follow through, turnover.

I would look at the people working with you, but give a specially close look at the people that would report to you: nothing will cause you to fail faster than if the people working under you are not cooperative. I personally prefer building my own team -- it's easier.

I would look at the work: what you would be expected to do, how will you be evaluated, who would be evaluating you, do you have good rapport, is there room for development and advancement both inside and outside the company (because sometimes things just don't work out), is the job something that would keep your interest long term.

Last, I would look at total compensation: salary, bonuses, stock options/RSU, 401K/NQDC and matches, HSA, vacations, flex time, reserved parking, loan subsidies or preferred interest rates are just some of them. All these are negotiable, by the way.

I had to choose between a small start-up and a large company. I chose the start-up because of the work and the people (and I negotiated the compensation so that it was basically equal). But after 3 months, the small start-up decided to pivot and completely overhaul their system -- my job would be narrower in focus. After the change was announced, I contacted the large company; they reinstated their offer, so I jumped. You just never know what would happen. (By the way, this is an example of the importance of gracefully declining an offer.)
 

rainyjewels

eat me
O.G.
Nov 8, 2006
4,664
40
I would look at management: what is their style, do you like the decisions they make, do you like how they make decisions, how do they follow through, turnover.

I would look at the people working with you, but give a specially close look at the people that would report to you: nothing will cause you to fail faster than if the people working under you are not cooperative. I personally prefer building my own team -- it's easier.

I would look at the work: what you would be expected to do, how will you be evaluated, who would be evaluating you, do you have good rapport, is there room for development and advancement both inside and outside the company (because sometimes things just don't work out), is the job something that would keep your interest long term.

Last, I would look at total compensation: salary, bonuses, stock options/RSU, 401K/NQDC and matches, HSA, vacations, flex time, reserved parking, loan subsidies or preferred interest rates are just some of them. All these are negotiable, by the way.

I had to choose between a small start-up and a large company. I chose the start-up because of the work and the people (and I negotiated the compensation so that it was basically equal). But after 3 months, the small start-up decided to pivot and completely overhaul their system -- my job would be narrower in focus. After the change was announced, I contacted the large company; they reinstated their offer, so I jumped. You just never know what would happen. (By the way, this is an example of the importance of gracefully declining an offer.)

Thank you for the very thoughtful response! Definitely a lot of great points to consider here.
 

JulieJames

New Member
Oct 11, 2015
3
0
If presented with the opportunity, which would you choose: small, not well known but stable company/role or high profile, high risk company/role? What factors would influence your decision?



I think my decision would be based on my short term and long term goal and current circumstances.


Some time a "not well known" company can provide a good platform which can help achieve the career path I am aiming for.


Risk is completely influenced by current circumstances, if my circumstances allowing me to take well understood risk , I would go with it.


Cheers
J
 

JenW

The unrecognized brilliance of Keanu Reeves
Dec 12, 2014
909
1,085
It depends on what you want for the future. I would generally go with the stable job but that's because I really hate job instability. If it is easier for you to roll with the punches, go for the higher risk one and take the chance it pays off.
 

Eva1991

O.G.
Oct 12, 2011
5,026
596
If you're not a risk taker, go for the first job, the more stable one. Having to take risks can be very stressful if you're not really prepared for it and stress can affect your performance at work, unless of course you're used to working under pressure.
 
Top