What is the right thing to do....

Apr 3, 2008
667
1
in the clouds
So, I might have this situation. I raised money from a bunch of different people to participate in a running event and the proceeds go to charity. There is a possibility I might not be able to participate in this event I fund raised for the last few months because I'm starting a new job(not sure about the start date/and if i can negotiate it). My donors are really excited about the event. What should I tell them if I can't go? The charity keeps all the money ....but for some reason I feel like I should pay them back since most of them donated just because I was participating in addition to the good cause.

I was thinking I could not say anything if i cant go so I dont have to have a bunch of awkward convos...or i could just mention it if someone brings it up....or i send a mass email to all my donors explaining the situation and let them know the charity keeps the money but im willing to pay them back...
 

Echoes

Member
Aug 8, 2008
10,401
8
Well, whatever you do, don't do 'nothing'.

Either do the event or contact the people and offer the option of a refund if they choose. Some may decline and let the donation stand.
 
Apr 3, 2008
667
1
in the clouds
Well, whatever you do, don't do 'nothing'.

Either do the event or contact the people and offer the option of a refund if they choose. Some may decline and let the donation stand.
The charity has a policy that they get to keep everything. Its a well known organization internationally. Right now, I am not really in a position to pay people back for what they donated since I have been unemployed for awhile. Anyways, I just hope the new job is understanding so I don't have to go through the worst case scenario.
 

Charles

Sucks at budgeting
O.G.
Jan 5, 2007
15,461
3,399
45
Jacksonville, Fl
Yeah, I think when most people give to things like that, it's mostly for the charity and they're not going to hold you to your participation in the race. Now, if you said "Well, I drank too much last night and I didn't feel like walking", then that's kind of crappy, but if you give them a heads up and say "Hey guys, given my new job, it looks like I won't be able to walk/run the race, but I've been assured that your donation will be helping a lot of people, so thank you so much for your contributions. I'll be participating in future events, so hopefully I can make up for it." smiley face, less than 3, xoxoxox, BFF, LYLAS, etc, etc, they should understand.
 
Mar 14, 2006
5,519
848
the lowcountry
Well, whatever you do, don't do 'nothing'.

Either do the event or contact the people and offer the option of a refund if they choose. Some may decline and let the donation stand.
this!

The charity has a policy that they get to keep everything. Its a well known organization internationally. Right now, I am not really in a position to pay people back for what they donated since I have been unemployed for awhile. Anyways, I just hope the new job is understanding so I don't have to go through the worst case scenario.
just be up front with people, say exactly what you just wrote. I would imagine most if not all people will be understanding and not require a refund, but if they get the impression that you were sneaky about it then you will lose friendships and relationships.

tell them the situation, explain that you don't have the funds to refund everyone now but if anyone would like a refund, you will work with them to pay them back over time after your new paycheck starts. people will understand that taking a new job takes priority over running this race.

maybe even ask if there is anyone who would be willing to take over for you and run in your place? if people see that you are genuinely sorry and making an effort to make it right, they won't want to fault you or the company they were donating to.
 

Mimster

Member
Jul 20, 2009
3,445
5
Let your donators know and they will understand. Did they get a charity tax receipt? I understand that some people may feel suspicious as there are some people who ask for donations and then disappear but as long as they received the official receipt then it shouldn't be a problem.

I went through something like that a few years back. A parent acquaintance was asking for donations for a local charity but turned out she kept the money for herself. Since then I never give cash donations and is very picky which organizations I give to.
 
Apr 3, 2008
667
1
in the clouds
this!



just be up front with people, say exactly what you just wrote. I would imagine most if not all people will be understanding and not require a refund, but if they get the impression that you were sneaky about it then you will lose friendships and relationships.

tell them the situation, explain that you don't have the funds to refund everyone now but if anyone would like a refund, you will work with them to pay them back over time after your new paycheck starts. people will understand that taking a new job takes priority over running this race.

maybe even ask if there is anyone who would be willing to take over for you and run in your place? if people see that you are genuinely sorry and making an effort to make it right, they won't want to fault you or the company they were donating to.
The organization automatically sends a receipt and puts you on the mailing list when you donate. All the money is donated online so no one physically handed me any money. I'm sure they all will keep getting mail now from the nonprofit.
 

Eva1991

Member
Oct 12, 2011
5,022
566
Europe
If you can't participate in the charity, then the right thing to do is give the money back to the people who gave them to you.
 

natcolb65

O.G.
Mar 31, 2009
678
11
Maryland
If I donated I would never ask or expect to get my money back. I'd be doing it for the charity not because one of my friends were taking part in the event.