Toys-R-Us Express - Why I dont approve

Nov 18, 2010
987
3
49
Brooklyn, NY
A few weeks ago a TRU Express opened up in my neighborhood, right around the corner from a local Brick and Mortar toy store Business. If you dont know what a TRU Express store is its a pop up location which more often than not has no intention of staying open past the Holiday season. In fact they didnt even spend money on a sign other than a poster, clearly indicating that they are only here for a bit.

While its wonderful for the consumer to have an option of a toys r us without having to pack the family into the car and make the trip (the nearest TRU is about 20 minutes from this location) its very unfair for the local store. I know that these local stores rely on the Holiday season to put them in the black and without it they cannot survive. While that may not be the consumers problem, its unfair for the consumer that wants them there when they want to run in for a quick gift and not shlep down to the TRU yet doesn't support them to enable that.

I have no problem with a TRU moving in on a full time basis, I just object to them moving in durting the years of plenty and then moving on during the lean years, and the customers that encourage that should rethink their actions.
 

Leah411

....ever ours
Feb 10, 2006
2,518
4
Since you've made it clear on this forum that you are a business owner, I assume this comes from that perspective. You don't want them "stealing" your customers.

However, I think these temporary stores - be they toys or other items - are helpful to the consumer. Temporary stores opening up during the holiday season are not "moving in during the years of plenty and then moving on during the lean years". Such an odd statment when you say yourself that they close after the holidays. And these certainly aren't years of plenty! They are simply offering an additional temporary location for the holidays, which actually makes things easier for the consumer. Especially those that have transportation issues. I've noticed a number of companies that do this, and think it's a smart business move. It gives the consumers options. Usually, those "brick-and-morter" (is TRU not "brick and morter"? After all, they are a physical location, not the internet) toy stores stock different, more unique toys than do the chains. Toys that not found at Toys-R-Us and vice versa. I don't find it to be a head-to-head competition. It also helps provide additional seasonal jobs, which in this economy is a very needed thing.

You ask customers to "rethink their actions". Some business owners need to do this as well. Instead of whining about the competition, figure out a way to offer something that the competition does not. You can't blame others for the status of your own business, for which you are responsible.

And, no, I do not care to hear what ideas those might be nor any more details about your business. You've made it clear from the beginning that you have a business, and you run the risk of violating the advertising/promotion rules of tPF if you talk about it or give specifics.
 
Nov 18, 2010
987
3
49
Brooklyn, NY
Since you've made it clear on this forum that you are a business owner, I assume this comes from that perspective. You don't want them "stealing" your customers.

And, no, I do not care to hear what ideas those might be nor any more details about your business. You've made it clear from the beginning that you have a business, and you run the risk of violating the advertising/promotion rules of tPF if you talk about it or give specifics.

Thanks for the response (even if it is a little presumptive and biting (whining? C'mon...I offered an opinion).

No, I dont sell toys. :smile: but I do feel for store owners that sell toys and rely on this season for their livelihood.

And as someone that wants a local store to be open all year so that I or my wife can run in for a birthday gift or whatnot I think that you can't have your cake and eat it too which is a local store when you want it and best pricing when you want it as well.

Just my .02 which I am entitled to as are you.
 

EllAva

♥♡♥♡♥♡♥
Dec 27, 2009
765
1
the South
A few weeks ago a TRU Express opened up in my neighborhood, right around the corner from a local Brick and Mortar toy store Business. If you dont know what a TRU Express store is its a pop up location which more often than not has no intention of staying open past the Holiday season. In fact they didnt even spend money on a sign other than a poster, clearly indicating that they are only here for a bit.

While its wonderful for the consumer to have an option of a toys r us without having to pack the family into the car and make the trip (the nearest TRU is about 20 minutes from this location) its very unfair for the local store. I know that these local stores rely on the Holiday season to put them in the black and without it they cannot survive. While that may not be the consumers problem, its unfair for the consumer that wants them there when they want to run in for a quick gift and not shlep down to the TRU yet doesn't support them to enable that.

I have no problem with a TRU moving in on a full time basis, I just object to them moving in durting the years of plenty and then moving on during the lean years, and the customers that encourage that should rethink their actions.
Say what?

Anyway,
"Capitalism is an economic system in which the means of production are privately owned and operated for a private profit; decisions regarding supply, demand, price, distribution, and investments are made by private actors in the free market"

In other words, if you don't like it, don't shop there.
 
Nov 18, 2010
987
3
49
Brooklyn, NY
Say what?

Anyway,
"Capitalism is an economic system in which the means of production are privately owned and operated for a private profit; decisions regarding supply, demand, price, distribution, and investments are made by private actors in the free market"

In other words, if you don't like it, don't shop there.
Yes, its certainly a smart and profitable move for Toys R Us. Did I ever say it wasnt? Quite the contrary, its a great move because you only have profitable seasons and nothing else. But if it were followed by the local stores as well then you would never have a local business when you wanted it there, (which most of us do because its very convenient) as they would all open up only in season and your local (I mean walking distance) would suffer because of it.

Do I think this way because I am in the retail business. Probably. Does this particular instance affect my business, not in the slightest.
 
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PrincessD

Hello!!
O.G.
Jan 23, 2009
4,241
19
Canada
If consumers are given 2 options and price are pretty much the same, most consumers will go for the brand name (in this case TRU). Because TRU is a big company, their toys may be cheaper because they import a big amount compared to smaller retailers and they probably have more varieties also. I guess that's the benefit of paying a licensing fee to buy the name. Also, a big company like TRU can afford to have pop up shops to appear in certain areas to increase their sale during times like this. Yes, it not really fair to open it next to another toy store, but nothing in life is fair... companies will locate their stores where they see there's a market.
 

natalie78

Did you die?
O.G.
May 6, 2008
5,035
11
Texas
And as someone that wants a local store to be open all year so that I or my wife can run in for a birthday gift or whatnot I think that you can't have your cake and eat it too which is a local store when you want it and best pricing when you want it as well.
This makes no sense to me.

I always try to support local business when I can, but I am not wealthy and for me, cost comes first. If I need a toy for a gift and both the local store and TRU have the exact same thing I am looking for, I will purchase it from the store with the lower price.

For local businesses to survive, the owners need to bring something different to the table. In this example of toy stores, TRU sells expendable toys that are relatively inexpensive. The local toy store owner needs to either sell the same items at lower or competitive prices, or go for something different, like hand-made heirloom toys. Consumers need to be given a reason to pass up the chain stores.
 
Nov 18, 2010
987
3
49
Brooklyn, NY
This makes no sense to me.

I always try to support local business when I can, but I am not wealthy and for me, cost comes first. If I need a toy for a gift and both the local store and TRU have the exact same thing I am looking for, I will purchase it from the store with the lower price.

For local businesses to survive, the owners need to bring something different to the table. In this example of toy stores, TRU sells expendable toys that are relatively inexpensive. The local toy store owner needs to either sell the same items at lower or competitive prices, or go for something different, like hand-made heirloom toys. Consumers need to be given a reason to pass up the chain stores.

But thats just it. The local stores are bringing something different to the table in the fact that they are there Always and in order to be there always they may have to charge a little more or even if they dont charge a little more as a consumer if one always goes for the store that only comes in during the shopping season we shouldnt be surprised if when we want to run in for a quick birthday gift the local shop is no longer open.

Besides, I would have thought that a personal touch and relationship with a store owner counts for something.
 

EllAva

♥♡♥♡♥♡♥
Dec 27, 2009
765
1
the South
Yes, its certainly a smart and profitable move for Toys R Us. Did I ever say it wasnt? Quite the contrary, its a great move because you only have profitable seasons and nothing else. But if it were followed by the local stores as well then you would never have a local business when you wanted it there, (which most of us do because its very convenient) as they would all open up only in season and your local (I mean walking distance) would suffer because of it.

Do I think this way because I am in the retail business. Probably. Does this particular instance affect my business, not in the slightest.
Local businesses do not operate based on the idea that they "will be there for you." They operate based on what is most profitable for them. If local businesses could find a short-term lease and still survive operating only seasonally, I'm sure they'd be doing it.
 

twinkle.tink

Choose to be happy
O.G.
Sep 19, 2006
21,304
221
in a fairy house
The truth is all big business is not 'evil' and all small businesses 'good'.

I have had great pricing, good selection and great service in big chains, regular locations and seasonal ones. I have had horrible service, higher prices or lack of selection at local businesses....and vice-a-versa...

I try and shop local when I can but, also refuse to do so just because they are local. Those businesses still need to 'earn' my business.
 
Nov 18, 2010
987
3
49
Brooklyn, NY
Local businesses do not operate based on the idea that they "will be there for you." They operate based on what is most profitable for them. If local businesses could find a short-term lease and still survive operating only seasonally, I'm sure they'd be doing it.
Certainly. But they usually cant so they dont.

Lets go back to the premise of this thread.

I stated (and I am allowed to, no?) that I dont like the fact that a toy store moves around the corner of a local business only during the main toy buying season with intent to capitalize on the season and then move out. I dont think its fair to the local business and while it may appear to be a great thing for the consumers short term it eventually (IMO) harms the customer because it creates a situation that is impossible for the local storeowner to survive and they close up shop.

Now for the disclaimer. This is my OPINION. Please feel free to agree, disagree or abstain. Please do NOT attack me personally or assume that I have said or done something I havent.

Thank you.
 

natalie78

Did you die?
O.G.
May 6, 2008
5,035
11
Texas
But thats just it. The local stores are bringing something different to the table in the fact that they are there Always and in order to be there always they may have to charge a little more or even if they dont charge a little more as a consumer if one always goes for the store that only comes in during the shopping season we shouldnt be surprised if when we want to run in for a quick birthday gift the local shop is no longer open.

Besides, I would have thought that a personal touch and relationship with a store owner counts for something.
Being open all year is not "something different." Offering something that the big box stores do not have is something different. I wil pay more for something unique that I cannot get elsewhere.

And I don't know if it is the economy or sign of the times, but I have found very few businesses (local and national) care about "personal touch and relationship."
 

twinkle.tink

Choose to be happy
O.G.
Sep 19, 2006
21,304
221
in a fairy house
Certainly. But they usually cant so they dont.

Lets go back to the premise of this thread.

I stated (and I am allowed to, no?) that I dont like the fact that a toy store moves around the corner of a local business only during the main toy buying season with intent to capitalize on the season and then move out. I dont think its fair to the local business and while it may appear to be a great thing for the consumers short term it eventually (IMO) harms the customer because it creates a situation that is impossible for the local storeowner to survive and they close up shop.

Now for the disclaimer. This is my OPINION. Please feel free to agree, disagree or abstain. Please do NOT attack me personally or assume that I have said or done something I havent.

Thank you.
If the small toy shop has done their job well...
Kept a decent selection of quality toys, at reasonable prices, while providing good service....the truth is they have very little to fear.

If on the other hand...
They have taken advantage of the fact that the closest TRU is 20 minutes away, and have higher prices or poor customer service (including poor return policies, which frankly some small shops do), then people are going to finally exercise their right to go else where.
 

natalie78

Did you die?
O.G.
May 6, 2008
5,035
11
Texas
No one here is attacking your personally. We are simply challenging your argument and stating our own opinions. You are taking it personally.

There are several ways for local businesses to stay relevant when a national chain moves into town. Sitting back and complaining is not one of them. They can change product options, offer sales, etc.
 
Nov 18, 2010
987
3
49
Brooklyn, NY
If the small toy shop has done their job well...
Kept a decent selection of quality toys, at reasonable prices, while providing good service....the truth is they have very little to fear.
I agree fully. But invariably they cannot compete with the global big boys because as posted earlier, they cannot compete on pricing and to be totally frank small business doesnt have the option of floating stock and operating in the red like many public companies do.

If on the other hand...
They have taken advantage of the fact that the closest TRU is 20 minutes away, and have higher prices or poor customer service (including poor return policies, which frankly some small shops do), then people are going to finally exercise their right to go else where.
Again, I agree fully. But as was stated here price seems to be the only factor in many peoples minds (which is why these companies open up pop ups in the first place). Do I fault it? Certainly not in these difficult times. I just dont think its fair and people shouldnt be surprised to see their local shops close. In the words of Elmer Fudd..."bde, bde, bde, Thats all folks!"

:smile:

ETA: And to clarify again, I dont mind if the playing field would be level, they moved in an stayed open. Its when they do a slam bam, thank you ma'am type of fly by opening that I feel is unfair and harmful to the local economy.
 
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