The BIG Cat Who Likes Getting Wet & Wild** Spectacular Footage**

bagnshoofetish

Oh. Gee.
O.G.
Feb 12, 2006
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Those are beautiful photos!
All tigers have webbed toes just for this purpose. I always tell people if you are ever chased by a tiger, do not go into the water! They will chase prey into rivers just for this purpose. They are so friggin strong they can pull a 2,000 lb animal out of the water! True killing machines. They are one of my favorite animals to work with.

p.s. they also love to take swims on very hot days...so cute.

p.s.s. (sorry but you know me...) all white tigers are actually descendants of one white male tiger born in India many years ago. I'll look up his name and some photos. Most if not all white tigers are Bengal from this one male.
 

bagnshoofetish

Oh. Gee.
O.G.
Feb 12, 2006
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This is actually a trait that most legitimate zoos will not try to breed on purpose due to white tigers being prone to genetic defects and shorter life-span.
more white tiger stuff:


The first mutant 'white' cub is believed to be the one trapped by the Maharaja of Rewa, who found it orphaned in the jungle in 1951. Named Mohan, the cub was later mated to a normal-coloured captive tigress who produced three litters with normal colouring. A few years later, Mohan mated with one of the offspring, producing the first litter of white cubs - these were to be the ancestors of others now in many zoos the world over.
The white tiger origin was recorded in India during the start of the HB Mughal period from 1556 to 1605 A.D.
The first documented case of a white tiger being captured was in 1915. He was caught by the local maharajah who kept the tiger until its death.
White tigers grow at a faster and heavier rate than orange Bengal tigers.
White tigers are extremely rare and have only been spotted in India.
During the last 100 years, only about 12 white tigers have been spotted in the wild in India; giving an approximate ratio of 1 white tiger for every 10,000 normal pigmented (orange) tigers. Their white color does not help them in their natural environment, the jungle. Rather, it is a hindrance, as the white stands out instead of blending in.

 

graceful

O.G.
May 19, 2006
6,106
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New Orleans
www.myspace.com
Thanks prada for posting those amazing pictures! He looks so fierce. I love his big paws and he looks like he loves the water!

Also, thank you to bagnshoo for the most interesting information above! I am always learning something new on this forum!
 
Jan 23, 2006
15,875
19
New York New York
This is actually a trait that most legitimate zoos will not try to breed on purpose due to white tigers being prone to genetic defects and shorter life-span.
more white tiger stuff:

The first mutant 'white' cub is believed to be the one trapped by the Maharaja of Rewa, who found it orphaned in the jungle in 1951. Named Mohan, the cub was later mated to a normal-coloured captive tigress who produced three litters with normal colouring. A few years later, Mohan mated with one of the offspring, producing the first litter of white cubs - these were to be the ancestors of others now in many zoos the world over.
The white tiger origin was recorded in India during the start of the HB Mughal period from 1556 to 1605 A.D.
The first documented case of a white tiger being captured was in 1915. He was caught by the local maharajah who kept the tiger until its death.
White tigers grow at a faster and heavier rate than orange Bengal tigers.
White tigers are extremely rare and have only been spotted in India.
During the last 100 years, only about 12 white tigers have been spotted in the wild in India; giving an approximate ratio of 1 white tiger for every 10,000 normal pigmented (orange) tigers. Their white color does not help them in their natural environment, the jungle. Rather, it is a hindrance, as the white stands out instead of blending in.
Your welcome graceful :heart:

Thanks bagnshoo for your input & expertise as always. :smile:
 

kmccrea

Designer At Large
Apr 28, 2006
652
1
Phoenix, AZ
Wow!
Odin is a beauty! They were right in naming him after a god (Norse). I know tigers like water and being around it, but this guy seems to truly enjoy it. He also looks similar to tigers in Chinese paintings.
Thanks for posting the pictures. Now, I'm going to have to go to California to see him. It's not so far away.