Workplace Thank you note question...

Style_Baby

O.G.
Nov 2, 2006
718
70
For those of you in a hiring position (or anyone who's ever been in on a hiring process), does a thank you note make the difference between a "yes" or "no" in a job offer?

The Situation: I was up for a training coordinator position and had passed two phone interviews. I was invited for an in-person interview and thought it went well-- I managed to answer questions in full sentences, get my central message across, and not throw up on anyone. Normally, my standard practice is to send a thank you note that very day to everyone I have spoken to (including the receptionist or security guards), but this time, I figured that if they wanted me, they wanted me and if they didn't, a thank you note wasn't going to change their minds.

The interview was that Tuesday. On Thursday, I e-mailed the contract manager (who set up the interview) to see if she'd heard anything about the position, and on Friday she responded to say that the position had already been filled. I thanked her for letting me know.

What I did do with the thank you notes: After I found out that I didn't get the job, I sent both of the interviewers a thank you note thanking them for their time and letting them know that, while I knew the position had already been filled, I would still love to keep in touch.

But the question I keep asking myself is... did the thank you notes (or lack thereof) make the difference in me getting the job or not?
 

vela

Member
Mar 30, 2011
47
0
For those of you in a hiring position (or anyone who's ever been in on a hiring process), does a thank you note make the difference between a "yes" or "no" in a job offer?

The Situation: I was up for a training coordinator position and had passed two phone interviews. I was invited for an in-person interview and thought it went well-- I managed to answer questions in full sentences, get my central message across, and not throw up on anyone. Normally, my standard practice is to send a thank you note that very day to everyone I have spoken to (including the receptionist or security guards), but this time, I figured that if they wanted me, they wanted me and if they didn't, a thank you note wasn't going to change their minds.

The interview was that Tuesday. On Thursday, I e-mailed the contract manager (who set up the interview) to see if she'd heard anything about the position, and on Friday she responded to say that the position had already been filled. I thanked her for letting me know.

What I did do with the thank you notes: After I found out that I didn't get the job, I sent both of the interviewers a thank you note thanking them for their time and letting them know that, while I knew the position had already been filled, I would still love to keep in touch.

But the question I keep asking myself is... did the thank you notes (or lack thereof) make the difference in me getting the job or not?

it varies across the board but it seems the general consensus is to send it. better safe than sorry.
 

Mr. Ho

♢♢♢
O.G.
Aug 11, 2008
210
1
Sending a thank you note, even if you didn't get the job is a great idea. Any type of gesture to keep you fresh in their minds, or set you apart is good. Many times I have hired a person, and then shortly after needed another person; the first thing I do is look back at my last interviews. So, letting them know you are still interested in any future opportunities is a good idea.
 

jpgoeth

Shopinator
Jul 6, 2007
2,544
2
Thank you notes have made me give second interviews that I wouldn't have otherwise and some of those people ended up getting hired, but I can't think of an instance where the final hiring decision depended on a thank you note or lack thereof.
 
Dec 14, 2006
2,857
8
I almost always send a thank you note to my interviewer or anyone who I spoke to extensively during my interview. An interview is not just for you to sell yourself to the company, but also for them to convince you that you should want to work for their company. A note tells them that after the interview you still want to be considered for the job. Many people, myself included, leave an interview not wanting the job anymore. In those situations I have not sent thank you notes.

I think sending a note to a receptionist is a little bit of overkill unless you interacted for a bit. Sending one to a security guard is honestly a little odd. What would you be thanking the security guard for? Plus security guards usually don't work for the company itself and are contracted employees.
 
Apr 15, 2007
64,167
11,975
I remember several years ago, I sent a "thank you" note to the person who interviewed with regard to a postion.. she called me back and I did indeed get hired.. so to me,anything that one can do to stand out can make a difference...
 

Style_Baby

O.G.
Nov 2, 2006
718
70
Thanks to everyone for the feedback.

Re: the security guard - It was a special situation because we did interact for a bit. He was a sweetheart and ended up stowing my luggage and coat (I had travelled for the interview) so I sent him a thank you note for that. Point being, I don't only send notes to people who are making the hiring decision. I'm just wondering if a thank you note has ever been the deciding factor.
 
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