Terry Richardson Accused Of Offering Photo Shoot For Sex

  1. Sign up to become a TPF member, and most of the ads you see will disappear. It's free and quick to sign up, so join the discussion right now!
    Dismiss Notice
  2. The Nordstrom Spring Sale is now live! Serious savings on customer favorites - up to 40% off with free shipping and free returns. Shop the sale!
    Dismiss Notice
Our PurseForum community is made possible by displaying online advertisements to our visitors.
Please consider supporting us by disabling your ad blocker. Thank you!
  1. http://www.foxnews.com/entertainment/2014/04/21/terry-richardson-sexual-message-allegations-model/#

    Model Emma Appleton says she regrets sharing a racy message about trading sex for a photo shoot that she believed came from famed photographer Terry Richardson.

    She posted a screengrab of the message, which caused a stir on Sunday, that read “If i can f—k you i will book you in ny for a.shoot for Vogue”

    Appleton has since deleted the Twitter account that she shared the message from, but she told Buzzfeed she believed it came from Richardson’s Facebook page.

    Richardson's rep denied the contents of the message in a statement to Fox411.

    "Terry Richardson did not reach out to this woman. It was sent from a Facebook page that is fake. Terry has no knowledge of who sent this," a spokesperson said. "Mr. Richardson has retained online forensic expert Theo Yedinsky to determine the actual origin of the faked posting."

    Meanwhile, Vogue U.S. told the site it hasn’t worked with Richardson in several years and has no plans to work with the controversial photographer in the future. Vogue Paris worked with him in February.

    Appleton insisted via Instagram on Monday morning that she didn’t share the alleged Richardson message for attention, and she doesn’t appreciate the media hype that’s come her way. She acknowledged in her post that the message could have been sent from a Facebook account impersonating Richardson.

    “Let me clear something up — I don’t want this attention, I have no desire to become known in the slightest,” she wrote. “If the account is fake then it needs to be removed, if it is real then he is a hideous human. I regret posting it because of what it’s caused but at the same time (if it’s real) then it shouldn’t be covered up, there are too many young, vulnerable girls that this industry can exploit.”

    Richardson has been accused of inappropriate conduct with young models on the set of his photo shoots in the past. He has repeatedly denied those allegations. He recently made headlines for filming Miley Cyrus' controversial "Wrecking Ball" video.

    Appleton did not immediately respond to an email requesting additional comment.
     
  2. Grass is also green... He ain't got no shame...
     
  3. Not uncle terry
     
  4. http://www.buzzfeed.com/alisonvingiano/vogue-terry-richardson-conde-nast

    On Sunday, model Emma J. Appleton tweeted a message allegedly sent by fashion photographer Terry Richardson, suggesting a Vogue shoot in exchange for sex.

    Appleton’s tweet — the contents of which a spokeswoman for Richardson immediately dismissed to BuzzFeed as fake — again raises questions about whether leading fashion magazines and brands will continue to work with a photographer who has been accused repeatedly of demanding sex from models.

    Richardson, whose recent subjects range from Miley Cyrus to Lena Dunham, has continued to operate at the highest level of the magazine industry despite the detailed allegations, which he has vaguely denied. He has never been charged with or convicted of a crime in connection with the allegations.

    In a post on Reddit in March (which has since been removed), former model Charlotte Waters described an interaction with Richardson that began as a typical fashion shoot, but allegedly quickly escalated into unwanted sexual advances and acts, which included Richardson asking that she perform oral sex on him.

    Though the post was originally anonymous, Waters quickly came forward as the source of the allegation. Models Jamie Peck, Liskula Cohen, and Rie Rasmussen told similar Richardson stories.

    In response to Waters’ claims, Richardson published a piece in the Huffington Post titled “Correcting the Rumors,” in which he wrote that he was the victim of an “emotionally-charged witch hunt” and offered a vague denial of the allegations.

    Richardson last shot for U.S. Vogue in July 2010. (Vogue Paris used him as recently as February of this year.)

    “We have no plans to work with him in the future,” said the communications director for U.S. Vogue, Hildy Kuryk.

    The model who posted the Sunday’s allegation, Emma Appleton, told BuzzFeed that the message came from Terry Richardson’s Facebook account.

    “This is obviously a fake. Terry did not send this text,” said a spokesperson for Richardson, Candice Marks.

    But Appleton, who later deleted the message, and whose account now appears deleted, insisted to BuzzFeed that it is authentic. She said she deleted the image because she doesn’t want “abuse or attention.”
     

    Attached Files:

  5. Yep, nothing more predictable than victim shaming. Its vile.
     
  6. What Terry had to say about the rumors.

    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/terry-richardson/response-to-rumors_b_4963974.html

    Correcting the Rumors

    Four years ago, I chose to primarily ignore a cycle of Internet gossip and false accusations against me. At that time, I felt that to dignify them with a response was a betrayal of my work and my character. When these allegations resurfaced over the past few months, they seemed especially vicious and distorted, moving outside the realm of critical dialogue and becoming nothing more than an emotionally-charged witch hunt. Enabled and protected by the freewheeling and often times anonymous nature of the Internet, people have become comfortable concocting hate-filled and libelous tales about my professional and personal lives. In writing this, I make a humble attempt at correcting these rumors, because I have come to realize that absent my voice in the conversation, all that remain are the lies.

    When I moved to New York in 1990 to take pictures, a lot of my work was a documentation of my life in the East Village; it was gritty, transgressive, and the aesthetic broke with the well-lit, polished fashion images of the time. My first big campaign, shot in 1994, was a provocative picture of a couple embracing in a bar. It was a shocking image for its time and the first instance a photograph of this nature was used in a major fashion advertisement.

    Like Robert Mapplethorpe, Helmut Newton, and so many others before me, sexual imagery has always been a part of my photography. Ten years ago, in 2004, I presented some of this work at a gallery show in New York City, accompanied by a book of the photos. The show was very popular and highly praised. The images depicted sexual situations and explored the beauty, rawness, and humor that sexuality entails. I collaborated with consenting adult women who were fully aware of the nature of the work, and as is typical with any project, everyone signed releases. I have never used an offer of work or a threat of rebuke to coerce someone into something that they did not want to do. I give everyone that I work with enough respect to view them as having ownership of their free will and making their decisions accordingly, and as such, it has been difficult to see myself as a target of revisionist history. Sadly, in the on-going quest for controversy-generated page views, sloppy journalism fueled by sensationalized, malicious, and manipulative recountings of this work has given rise to angry Internet crusades. Well-intentioned or not, they are based on lies. Believing such rumors at face value does a disservice not only to the spirit of artistic endeavor, but most importantly, to the real victims of exploitation and abuse.

    People will always have strong opinions about challenging images, and the dichotomy of sex is that it is both the most natural and universal of human behaviors and also one of the most sensitive and divisive. Over the course of my career, I have come to accept that some of my more provocative work courts controversy, and as an artist, I value the discourse that arises from this. I can only hope for this discourse to be informed by fact, so that whether you love my work or hate it, you give it, and me, the benefit of the truth.
     
  7. What a load of BS. Not even going to bother reading that. He's solicited many young models, both known and unknown and his powerful friends in the industry always manage to cover the stories up and have them erased before gaining popularity. He is such a sick, exploitative f*ck.

    Emma's twitter was deleted two afters she tweeted about this, and she was tweeting perfectly normal stuff before hand. It was so suspect. ugh.
     
  8. Lawd...he is NOT Mappelthorpe nor Newton. The hide of him to compare himself to them makes me laugh.

    This is an old site with some of Terry's "work". This is NSFW. This is NSFW.
     
  9. terry richardson is a disgusting predatory creep
     
  10. I'm not surprised in the slightest.
     
  11. I don't trust his claims of innocence AT ALL. He is so creepy and leering.
     
  12. Look up predator and you'd see a pic of him. He uses these girls' naivete and dreams of being discovered as a way to get himself off. Pathetic.
     
  13. Just looking at him and pretty much any photoshoot he's done kinda cements the ick factor.
     
  14. I only like his photoshoot of Obama honestly and tbh I think I could have taken those pics as well and used a good IG filter.