storing bags and stuffing them with bubble wrap ?

Cass_0x

Member
Jul 19, 2020
22
2
So basically I don’t use my handbags very often. There stored in my closet in there dust bags and I do have central air because we don’t want any mold. Anyways. I usually go and check out my bags every single day I’ll open my closets to get more ventilation in and leave it open for 5 mins or so and close it even tho there are cracks in the door but yea. I’ve been stuffing my bags with bubble wrap and I’ve started realizing that there’s been this odor. It just started happening. I took the bubble wrap out of one bag that I smelt didn’t smell right checked if there was any mold and there was nothing perfectly fine. But the bubble wrap developed this gross smell. Is it safe? What should I do? I need help ! Someone help me.
 

JolieS

Member
Oct 24, 2016
1,114
2,196
You’re making all the right moves to keep mold and mildew in check. However, bubble wrap is a synthetic, so best to avoid stuffing your bags with it, as it doesn’t allow the leather bags to “breathe.” Better would be acid-free tissue paper, available from online suppliers.
Remove the bubble wrap, wipe down the bags, and let them air out before stuffing again with acid-free tissue paper.
Good luck!
 

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Agree with @Jolie S above. My mom lives half the time in a tropical country. It’s my understanding that items in the dressing room from clothing to shoes and bags should not be stored with or in plastic due to plastic’s retention of moisture. Air circulation also helps any closet to the point where I design closet spaces to be somewhat open (I live in NYC and the master bedroom and adjacent dressing room is more humid in the summer). I do need to have everything dusted frequently. In our next apartment (we are in the process of figuring out the dressing room now, DH wants ceiling fans in the dressing room. I believe there are also threads on TPF as to whether or not to use anti-humidity sachets, devices or room temp/humidity controls near or in clothing or accessories. If you can keep the closet doors open and circulate air in the room via fan that helps. YMMV though as this may not be practical all the time. Good luck and please keep us posted!
 
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Cass_0x

Member
Jul 19, 2020
22
2
You’re making all the right moves to keep mold and mildew in check. However, bubble wrap is a synthetic, so best to avoid stuffing your bags with it, as it doesn’t allow the leather bags to “breathe.” Better would be acid-free tissue paper, available from online suppliers.
Remove the bubble wrap, wipe down the bags, and let them air out before stuffing again with acid-free tissue paper.
Good luck!
Thank you ! I will do that!!!
 

Cass_0x

Member
Jul 19, 2020
22
2
Agree with @Jolie S above. My mom lives half the time in a tropical country. It’s my understanding that items in the dressing room from clothing to shoes and bags should not be stored with or in plastic due to plastic’s retention of moisture. Air circulation also helps any closet to the point where I design closet spaces to be somewhat open (I live in NYC and the master bedroom and adjacent dressing room is more humid in the summer). I do need to have everything dusted frequently. In our next apartment (we are in the process of figuring out the dressing room now, DH wants ceiling fans in the dressing room. I believe there are also threads on TPF as to whether or not to use anti-humidity sachets, devices or room temp/humidity controls near or in clothing or accessories. If you can keep the closet doors open and circulate air in the room via fan that helps. YMMV though as this may not be practical all the time. Good luck and please keep us posted!
Okay thank you for the tips !
 
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ElenaAlex

Member
Jul 16, 2020
139
409
I stuff my bags with paper, bubble wraps and white clothes I no longer use. I haven't noticed any odor or bad smell from the them. Just for this post I smelled the bubble wraps and they smell of nothing - maybe it comes from the bubble wraps you use? I work from home so I rarely use my bags (so they are basically stuffed almost all the time) and I like every about 4 months (the beginning of each season) to ventilate them - I take them out of the dust bags, take the stuffing out and try to keep them as open as possible on the couch under the open window for a day. If the weather is suitable, I do that outside. I also keep a passive dehumidifier in the room, although I don't live in very humid climate, and not in very dry either.

I join to the opinions above - try use paper or maybe old clothes.
Good luck
 

Cass_0x

Member
Jul 19, 2020
22
2
thank you for the response ! So I went into further investigation and basically all my bags with Vachetta leather have them smell. But it’s a strong smell. It’s not terrible it’s just very very strong. Do you know if that normally happens ?
 

ElenaAlex

Member
Jul 16, 2020
139
409
I really don't know. I don't have bags in Vachetta leather - it is untreated and unprotected leather and I like to clean and condition my bags when I switch them and I'm too afraid I will ruin the look of it if I do that. My only suggestion is that because it is untreated and unprotected leather and leather does absorb smell, it did absorb a smell of some kind.

A while ago I noticed that some of my clothes, especially the ones from natural fibers, are having a weird smell, not a bad smell but a smell. At first i though it may be from the washing liquid, maybe I put too much and it is not washed well, but it turned to be a bag of herbs I use against moles. The bag itself had a very very mild smell and I really never though that the clothes can accumulate that smell so they actually smelled stronger than the bag itself.
 

Cass_0x

Member
Jul 19, 2020
22
2
Wow okay. I guess I’ll just have to deal with the smell. I’m trying to find the best way to describe the smell. It’s not bad bad. It’s like a very strong smell. If that makes any sense at all ?
 

JolieS

Member
Oct 24, 2016
1,114
2,196
IMO, do not use old clothes, rags or towels to stuff your bags because any remaining body oils, even if the fabrics are clean, will over time create odours. Best to use acid-free products to stuff leather bags.
 

Cass_0x

Member
Jul 19, 2020
22
2
IMO, do not use old clothes, rags or towels to stuff your bags because any remaining body oils, even if the fabrics are clean, will over time create odours. Best to use acid-free products to stuff leather bags.
Thank is for the response. I do not use anything besides bubble wrap or air packaging. Nothing else :sad: