Spaying/Neutering= Change in Personality?

oscarcat729

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Jun 24, 2008
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This thread isn't so much for me as it is for other worried "parents." I took my 2 kitties yesterday to get spayed and neutered. They were pretty sleepy last night, but this morning the male's almost 100% and the female is like 80%. So far, I haven't noticed a change in their personalities, but I heard it could happen. Have any of you fellow cat/dog owners witnessed a change after your pet was fixed? What was it, how soon did it occur, and did it last?
 

~KT~

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I haven't noticed a change in any of my pets personalities at all but they all get fixed before puberty. My aunt had a poodle who wasn't fixed till he was around 5 and she said he changed alot and became "lazy", she was really unhappy. But for everyone else it was nice because he was territorial and bit alot. His change apparently was immediately, as was my friends cat when he was fixed at 3 years old.
 

chessmont

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Aug 22, 2006
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He's still evil. Shouldn't have waited till he was 6 mo, cause he still humps...
-mounting isn't always a sexual thing - it is also a dominant behavior; I have two female littermates, one is dominant to the other, and the dominant one humps the other one!:wtf:

Of course, I don't know the exact details with your doggie.
Does he mount humans? - that is a BIG no-no and calls for some definite corrrection/scolding/retraining by you.

With castration, some of my dogs changed a little, some did not...
 

stormy

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I own two german bred german shepherds that I do quite a bit of sport work with. My female was spayed when I got her. I waited to neuter my male until he was completely mature (2 years). He is now 3 and the only thing I have noticed is that he is definitely calmer (he was quite hyper before) and he has gained a bit of weight (he was also a very skinny youngster). He used to try to mount my female, mostly in play, but he does not do that anymore. Other than that there are no other changes. I am very pro spay/neuter. If you are not going to show or breed your pet, IMO there is no reason to keep them intact. There are way too many shelter animals out there!!
 
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Leelee

Up On My Toes!
Jun 6, 2006
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Highland, Maryland
I think your female kitty will recover just fine. Sometimes it might take a little longer...maybe a day or two. I just got three kitties in July and they all got spayed or neutered shortly thereafter. The oldest female (about 8 months) took about two days to act like her old self again.

I have had dogs and cats all my life and they have all been spayed or neutered. I've never noticed any personality changes due to this.
 

Lec8504

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Nov 10, 2006
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honestly I don't think that I would want to neuter my dog if I were to ever get another male dog. I would never mate my pets, but if I already have spayed females then I see no point in neutering imo.

I neutered my Tubby, when he was 6 months, he was completely fine then, no humping, no marking, and agression issues whatsoever. He was the perfect little thing, always so friendly toward other people. And then after the neutering, different personality issues started to pop up.

He started to growl and lunge at strangers, then he would start to hump my family members arms, then he started to mark whenever I smell another dog on what he thinks is his "territory". All of this happened one right after the other after his surgery. There was nothing tramatic that happened to him in the same period besides the neutering. So I can only think that it is the neutering was what did it to him. Also I have hired 4 private trainers for him (mainly for his agression toward strangers), nothing really worked.

After this experience, I've only loved him more, since I feel so bad for putting him through that experience and then to see him change so much in front of me :sad:

but yeh..my 2 females that were spayed..has no personality change..only my male. So I'm not realy sure what had happened. Also they all went to the same vet. It might be that mine is a weird fluke or something iono.
 

ChiChi143

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Jun 13, 2007
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I got my Chi neutered when he was 4. He stopped humping and marking his territory which was great. He did however gain a couple of pounds. Other than that, he's the same.
 

catherela

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Apr 1, 2008
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my chi was neutered when he was 8 mths. AND NO CHANGE WHATSOEVER! me and the bf were hoping that our little monster would calm down a little bit, but nope. same old, same old. if anything, we swear that he became crazier :Push:
 

chessmont

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honestly I don't think that I would want to neuter my dog if I were to ever get another male dog. I would never mate my pets, but if I already have spayed females then I see no point in neutering imo.


-that is so odd becoming that way at 6 months - but they do go through a 'fear' period around 5-7 months where something might happen that cause them to be fearful and they never recover. But I have had dogs castrated in this window (6 months) and they were not traumatized by it. Every dog is different, though. OTOH, after 6 months, he is developing his adult personality, which may be very much different from his puppy personality, regardless of being castrated.:shrugs:

I agree - you don't need to neuter your dog if you don't want to with no intact females to worry about, as long as you are always in control of his whereabouts. I always say, "a leash and a 6 foot fence are both good forms of birth control." A responsible owner is in control of their dog, and is in charge of whether a dog breeds or not. I castrated only my males who insisted on lifting their leg in the house. Some lived their whole lives intact, because they had good house manners, and I have never had an unintended breeding. It's all in the animal management. I know MO is unpopular here, but I know we tpfers are able to agree to disagree in a polite manner.:yes:

In some European countries it is illegal to castrate your dog unless for health reasons. Interesting.

CAts are a whole 'nother ball o' wax - the males will be impossible to live with if they are not castrated. Spraying everywhere and it is 1000X a more awful smell than castrated cat pee!
 
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~KT~

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I agree - you don't need to neuter your dog if you don't want to with no intact females to worry about, as long as you are always in control of his whereabouts. I always say, "a leash and a 6 foot fence are both good forms of birth control." A responsible owner is in control of their dog, and is in charge of whether a dog breeds or not. I castrated only my males who insisted on lifting their leg in the house. Some lived their whole lives intact, because they had good house manners, and I have never had an unintended breeding. It's all in the animal management. I know MO is unpopular here, but I know we tpfers are able to agree to disagree in a polite manner.:yes:

In some European countries it is illegal to castrate your dog unless for health reasons. Interesting.

CAts are a whole 'nother ball o' wax - the males will be impossible to live with if they are not castrated. Spraying everywhere and it is 1000X a more awful smell than castrated cat pee!
I think a lot of people are pro neutering because of the cancer risks. My parents owned an intact male sheltie and never had any problems but my mom is the first to say she would never do that again. And I agree about the tom cats, my neutered boys go nuts around spayed females, I couldn't imagine them being intact.
 

leothelnss

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-mounting isn't always a sexual thing - it is also a dominant behavior; I have two female littermates, one is dominant to the other, and the dominant one humps the other one!:wtf:

Of course, I don't know the exact details with your doggie.
Does he mount humans? - that is a BIG no-no and calls for some definite corrrection/scolding/retraining by you.

With castration, some of my dogs changed a little, some did not...
Well... Shibas generally have dominant/aggressive tendancies, so you might be right. He does mount humans, and our other dog (who is twice his size). None of us enjoy his behavior.
Because his breed is also very primitive, scolding doesn't seem to have much of an effect, and it is usually what I do. My husband will lay him on the ground and hold him down until he stops fighting, and then he lets him up.. He seems to respond better to that and I guess respects my husband more than me.
But anyway - he was like this before we had him neutered, I had been hoping that after we got it done the humping might cease, but maybe training is really what we need.
Thanks!
 

elizat

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Sep 21, 2007
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I noticed no change in my dog, except that he eats more now. The vet told me that this could happen, which is good for him b/c he's a small dog and was always a very picky eater for no apparent reason.
 

chessmont

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Well... Shibas generally have dominant/aggressive tendancies, so you might be right. He does mount humans, and our other dog (who is twice his size). None of us enjoy his behavior.
Because his breed is also very primitive, scolding doesn't seem to have much of an effect, and it is usually what I do. My husband will lay him on the ground and hold him down until he stops fighting, and then he lets him up.. He seems to respond better to that and I guess respects my husband more than me.


- Oh, now that I know the breed this is informative. I too, have a primitive breed (azawakh - my dogs have parents and grandparents that came straight from Africa, so my dogs' pedigrees have a lot of "Unknown" filled in the ancestor boxes). They resond well to scolding but it had start early. Some water squirting was involved as well ;o)

You have GOT get the human mounting under control. If a squirt bottle and a thunderous OFF doesn't work, get one of those kids' squirt guns that really spray hard, even from feet away. It worked for me. Or I have thrown a dog dish in their direction if they were on a floor surface where it would make a lot of noise, and again, OFF! The rollover your DH does, well, he is lucky he never got bitten, that said, if it works and no bites, then it works for him and the dog. But doesn't seem to solve anything but the immediate behavior action by the dog.

Yes, he respects your DH more, it sounds.

Can you find a contact phone number for a Shiba Club (I am not sure where in the world you are), but most countries have kennel clubs, you can ask for advice, maybe from someone near you, or even over the phone, who has been breeding and owning Shibas for many years, they may be able to offer advice.

Get into training ASAp, and you should be the one to take him to classes, not DH. He needs to know you are also "The Boss of Him"

You do have your hands full. Also a reputable behaviorist? Maybe the Shiba club or your vet can recommend someone.
 
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