Workplace Please Give Me Interview Tips!

deleckidesign

Member
Oct 23, 2008
2,230
3
Michigan
I have an interview tomorrow with a small design firm (I'm a graphic designer).

Please post questions you have been asked for an interview. I'm hoping this will help get me thinking about how I would answer them!
 

redney

Lovin' Life!
O.G.
Apr 21, 2006
13,769
3,487
Hi Deleckidesign, Good luck to you!!!

I posted this in another thread but it's applicable to you here:

Google "interview questions" or search on Monster. There are great repositories of standard questions out there.

There are several interviewing hints threads in the GD section, here's one.

http://forum.purseblog.com/general-...whats-worst-thing-youve-ever-done-292759.html

Before your interview (today!) stand in front of a mirror and PRACTICE ALOUD answers to standard interviewing questions, like "Tell me about your experience and how it fits into this job"; "What specific skills do you bring to this job/company"; "What is one of your weaknesses or strengths?"

Once you get used to saying the words out loud by yourself, you'll be sure as heck to feel tons more comfortable saying them during the actual interview itself.

Also do you have your questions prepared for the interviewer? Consider it this way: interviews are a two-way street. Just as the company is trying to determine if you have the skills, experience, "fit" for their job, you should also be trying to determine if the job, responsibilities, promotion opportunities, and company/culture are right for YOU.

Therefore, examples of some question you may want to ask are below. Of course you'll need to tailor them to your situation and the job to which you are applying.

  • What are the most important skills a successful candidate should bring to this position?
  • Can you share some examples of skills someone working in this job will develop?
  • Please share the career path for someone in this position. What promotion opportunities are available? What are the approximate timeframes or scenarios when someone might be eligible for review for promotion?
  • What is the definition of success for someone in this job?
  • How is performance measured for this job in this company?
  • Are there regular performance review periods? Do these feed into salary/promotion reviews?
  • Is there a formalized upward evaluation process?
  • How many other people work in this area/department/function?
  • What is the average tenure of someone in this job?
  • Is this job on that's newly created or is it to replace someone? If it's new, why was it created? If it is a replacement, is the outgoing person still at the company to provide a transition period?
  • What is the supervisor's management style? How long has s/he been in his/her role?
  • How would YOU (interviewer) describe the company culture?
  • What do YOU (interviewer) like about working at this company?
  • What do YOU (interviewer) dislike about working at this company?
  • Does this company support long-term growth? (this has more to do with the stability of the company)
  • Etc.


ETA: Sharing a major super-secret of the industry...if you can get the interviewer to talk about HIM/HERSELF, s/he usually has a more positive feeling of you/your candidacy after the interview. I swear. Everyone loves to "tell their story" and I've used this strategy pretty successfully in nearly all of the interviews where I've been on the candidate side of the table.

GOOD LUCK!!! :flowers:
 
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deleckidesign

Member
Oct 23, 2008
2,230
3
Michigan
Hi Deleckidesign, Good luck to you!!!

I posted this in another thread but it's applicable to you here:

Google "interview questions" or search on Monster. There are great repositories of standard questions out there.

I'm a corporate recruiter and no matter what company I've worked for, a candidate *not* having even one question about the job or the company is a major red flag among recruiters and hiring managers alike.

Consider it this way: interviews are a two-way street. Just as the company is trying to determine if you have the skills, experience, "fit" for their job, you should also be trying to determine if the job, responsibilities, promotion opportunities, and company/culture are right for YOU.

Therefore, examples of some question you may want to ask are below. Of course you'll need to tailor them to your situation and the job to which you are applying.

  • What are the most important skills a successful candidate should bring to this position?
  • Can you share some examples of skills someone working in this job will develop?
  • Please share the career path for someone in this position. What promotion opportunities are available? What are the approximate timeframes or scenarios when someone might be eligible for review for promotion?
  • What is the definition of success for someone in this job?
  • How is performance measured for this job in this company?
  • Are there regular performance review periods? Do these feed into salary/promotion reviews?
  • Is there a formalized upward evaluation process?
  • How many other people work in this area/department/function?
  • What is the average tenure of someone in this job?
  • Is this job on that's newly created or is it to replace someone? If it's new, why was it created? If it is a replacement, is the outgoing person still at the company to provide a transition period?
  • What is the supervisor's management style? How long has s/he been in his/her role?
  • How would YOU (interviewer) describe the company culture?
  • What do YOU (interviewer) like about working at this company?
  • What do YOU (interviewer) dislike about working at this company?
  • Does this company support long-term growth? (this has more to do with the stability of the company)
  • Etc.


ETA: Sharing a major super-secret of the industry...if you can get the interviewer to talk about HIM/HERSELF, s/he usually has a more positive feeling of you/your candidacy after the interview. I swear. Everyone loves to "tell their story" and I've used this strategy pretty successfully in nearly all of the interviews where I've been on the candidate side of the table.

ALSO

There are several interviewing hints threads in the GD section, check 'em out!

2nd Interview Tomorrow. .& Im Nervous

Interview Mistakes- What's the worst thing you've ever done?

Lastly, before your interview, stand in front of a mirror and PRACTICE ALOUD answers to standard interviewing questions, like "Tell me about your experience and how it fits into this job"; "What specific skills do you bring to this job/company"; "What is one of your weaknesses or strengths?"

Once you get used to saying the words out loud by yourself, you'll be sure as heck to feel tons more comfortable saying them during the actual interview itself.

GOOD LUCK!!! :flowers:
Thanks for the tips! I'm having a hard time getting into the interview frame of mind. I was laid off just one week ago, so I'm still trying to wrap my brain around the fact that I'm actually going on an interview!
 

redney

Lovin' Life!
O.G.
Apr 21, 2006
13,769
3,487
^^^Practice aloud, it will help

(Also I edited my previous post a little bit. After I posted it I realized I needed to change some stuff - sorry for any confusion!!!)
 

redney

Lovin' Life!
O.G.
Apr 21, 2006
13,769
3,487
^^^Fixed the one and deleted the other (there are other threads on GD if you search).

hope this helps!
 
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JSH812

horses&hounds
Jan 23, 2008
2,990
1
wild&wonderful
If a glass of water or other drink is offered - take it! You may be talking for so long (especially if you end up having great rapport with the interviewer) that you'll need some liquid to help your throat. It also helps when you need an extra second to stall...

Knowing ALL about the company is a must. Interviewers love hearing why you believe you will fit in with their company -- so flatter their ego w/o being totally obvious.

Since it's a design firm, you could even put together your own "campaign" to show your stuff!
 

tmc089

O.G.
Oct 6, 2007
3,366
0
Connecticut
Make sure you smile and don't say "umm...uhhh..." or anything like that. I had to work on that one for a while lol.

Best of luck of course!! :flowers:
 

SpoilMeRotten

=^..^=
Jan 3, 2008
1,302
0
Detroit
I am in the process of interviewing for an internal opening at my current company.. the first round they hit me with a ton of behavioral questions that I was totally not prepared for, like: Tell us about a time when your opinion was not valued, how did you react? Describe a situation where you resolved a conflict, etc. etc.... I work for a big corporation and it's a management position so don't know if any of this would be applicable for a design firm but you never know, it might be good to have some answers ready if they throw out the behavioral questions!

Good luck!
 

onegirlcreative

Daddy's Little Girl
Feb 11, 2008
8,391
3
Dovunque voglia andare
I have an interview tomorrow with a small design firm (I'm a graphic designer).

Please post questions you have been asked for an interview. I'm hoping this will help get me thinking about how I would answer them!
I am also a graphic designer, so I know your nervousness. In a sea of designers with HUGE portfolios and degrees, you and your portfolio must shine.

From what I was always told in design school during the portfolio review, always always know your fonts. They can all of a sudden out of nowhere ask you what font you used in a particular design. Knowing this will make you top notch in their eyes.

Be professional. Contrary to what people believe about how casual working as a designer is, don't show up wearing ripped jeans and a t-shirt. As cool as you think you look, save that for when you actually get hired.

In the meantime, wear something professional, but yet trendy. You have to show that you're trendy and progressive so your designs will reflect that as well.

Speak concisely and don't say "ummmm" "ummmm" all the time. That is a huge no-no. So many people within that genre seem to not know how to speak properly and it reflects in your interview.

Do some background on the company you're interviewing with so you look like you've done your research and you're eager to work for them.

Otherwise, stand by your designs. If they give you constructive criticism, accept it and don't take it personally. If anything, learn from it because this will help you during the next interview if you don't get hired. They're there to help you, not insult you. Remember, something about your resume and portfolio impressed them if they've called you in the first place.

Good luck and hang tough!
 
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bnjj

Jovi Junkie
O.G.
Apr 20, 2007
10,215
14
Bon Jovi Blvd.
I ask most of the questions posted above by redney.

I also ask:

  • how do you contribute to keeping your staff motivated
  • turn over rate of particular position and company in general
That's all I can think to add right now.