OMG!!!! My dog attacked me!!!!

invisicat

O.G.
Jul 15, 2006
536
0
USA
Hi all. I am so upset right now I don't know what to do. I hope someone can help me.

My usually loving pug attacked me today, a little while ago.

I had made sandwiches for my kids for lunch and my daughter dropped a half on the floor. The dog got it and I said, "Give me that" and went to take it out of his mouth. I got half of it and he got the other half. He put it on the floor, when I went to pick it up he hissed loudly at me and came after my hand. He was trying to bite my hand and then clamped onto my leg and was trying to bite me!!! I was freaking out and got so scared because he has never done anything like that to me before.

I learned early on never to try to take food from my dog.
 

Traci

Crazy for LV
Apr 18, 2006
7,702
9
Yes, well today he is being very causious around me. And twice he has had some toy of the kids that he's not supposed to have and as soon as I said something he dropped it. So.....I am really hopeing it was the food thing. Many people have now told me not to take food away from a dog.
 

hello2703

Show Me The Orange!
O.G.
Jun 17, 2006
8,063
13
Europe. Central.
Taking food away from a dog: Some dogs tolerate it easily, some don't. If I were a dog, I would be in the non-tolerating group. I hate sharing my food. My mother had the nerve-wrecking habit of picking from my plate. It was only by sheer self-restraint that I could stop myself stabbing my fork in her hand. And that was my mom! If I were a dog, I would snap. So there.

IF you want to be able to take food from your dog, then start by GIVING him food. This way he learns that your hand near his mouth or his bowl while he is eating means something good, that he gets more and nothing is taken away from him. That makes him relax. Then take stuff away but always return it. Step by step...

It's a good thing if your dog tolerates this. Not because it shows your superiority but because there may always be a situation when you need to take stuff out your dog's mouth because it could be dangerous to him.

Traci, stay firm. Try to incorporate the NILIF into your dealings with your dog. It will be better for you in the long run, I am sure!
 

kristal

O.G.
Apr 30, 2006
364
1
Several years ago I took a few classes called "Healing Touch for Animals",( which is an energetic and holistic based modality) from Carol Komitor, and was amazed by the things she could do for animals....all kinds of of animals, dogs, cats, birds, snakes, even horses. She has very specific techiniques for behavioral problems, pain control, anxiety issues, cancer etc and they work. There were even several vets taking the class so they could learn the techniques which I thought was very cool. I know she does phone consults but, have no idea what she charges. The webpage can be found at: www.healingtouchforanimals.com....anyhow, just thought I'd throw this out in case you ever need it......
 

Yorelica

O.G.
Jul 21, 2006
2,581
2
Omg...I'm so sorry to hear this and it breaks my heart to hear about a dog attacking its owner....Its very sad...

I'm glad your alright, be careful!

Anyhow....Yes its tough if you are too "nice" with your dog...they forget whose the owner... You've gotten lots of great advice already but I just want to say - make sure he knows your the boss. Be firm, be strong, don't let him have things his way.
 

hmwe46

why bother
O.G.
Jun 27, 2006
10,774
27
I just had to say that this advice is awesome!!! Your ridgey looks lovely!! :love:

I have been training my own dogs for show and obediance competition for many many years.

When we have a dog that lives in the house with us it is so easy to forget that we are living with *animals*. They don't speak English, they didn't come with the same emotions we did, ie spite.

It is more than remembering dogs are dogs, because the word dog has lost a lot meaning; it's conotation is 'fluffy house pet' now, not part of the carnivore family.

Dogs have two fundamental drives: prey and pack. If we humans can channel these drives to help the dogs live in our homes with rules contrary to their natural instincts, we can help our doggies have happier lives with us.

Good luck tr444! I think the NILIF training is a great idea, I am sure your doggie will happily learn to live in your house with these techniques.




Hi,

It is a common misconception that we owners think we can take food away from our dogs because we are their owners. Some dogs allow it, others don't.

There is a lot that I could say right now but the most important thing is: DON'T GIVE UP ON YOUR DOGGIE. Your dog isn't mean or vicious, this was just his way of communicating and quite possibly a consequence of the things he could get away with so far.

My advise would be to look into NILIF (Nothing In Life Is Free). It is basically a system that will make your dog take you NOT for granted. For every privilege (water, food, walks, playtime, toys) the dog has to offer something (sit, stay, down, also eye contact is a rewardable act). If he ignores you, tough luck for him, then there's no privilege. This may sound harsh but it isn't.
If your dog is allowed on the sofa or any other elevated space in the house, from now on this privilege is cancelled. The dog has his space (pillow or whatever) and that is it.
Another misconception is the hierarchy thing. Yes, we should be higher up in the hierarchy but in a pack leader the alpha has to earn his position. The position not only brings rewards but also responsibilities such as leading the pack and making the right decisions. It is quite possible that your dog doesn't accept you as leader because you do not communicate clearly and consistently.
Having said that, dogs aren't stupid and they know that we aren't dogs, so the whole leader of the pack theory in context with humans is somewhat erroneous.
Being a pug isn't an excuse for unacceptable behaviour which means that you as the owner shouldn't be too lenient 'because he's a pug'. A pug is a dog is a dog is a dog and dogs need consistent rules.
Please don't go into so called alpha-rolls and such things to establish your superiority to your dog - this will only make it worse.
As I said, check out NILIF (google it) and hopefully this will take you and your kids a lot further.
Good luck!!!
 

shushopn

I Feel Pretty!
O.G.
Jan 13, 2006
6,022
1
54
Long Island, NY
What a helpful and memorable way to explain it. I know I was lucky enough to grow up w/ dogs since I was 2 (I'm 41) and learned this through the brilliance of my parents. I think it is important to remember that we need to train ourselves to train our dogs.


I just had to say that this advice is awesome!!! Your ridgey looks lovely!! :love:

I have been training my own dogs for show and obediance competition for many many years.

When we have a dog that lives in the house with us it is so easy to forget that we are living with *animals*. They don't speak English, they didn't come with the same emotions we did, ie spite.

It is more than remembering dogs are dogs, because the word dog has lost a lot meaning; it's conotation is 'fluffy house pet' now, not part of the carnivore family.

Dogs have two fundamental drives: prey and pack. If we humans can channel these drives to help the dogs live in our homes with rules contrary to their natural instincts, we can help our doggies have happier lives with us.

Good luck tr444! I think the NILIF training is a great idea, I am sure your doggie will happily learn to live in your house with these techniques.
 

hmwe46

why bother
O.G.
Jun 27, 2006
10,774
27
^^ Thanks shushopn!!

My dogs are my "kids" in many ways but I never ever forget that god gave them sharp pointy teeth for a REASON. They are born hunters, no matter their size or domesticity today.

The best example I can think of is a run-away dog: your dogs dashes out the front door and what do you do? :confused1:Sprint after him/her, right?? WRONG. It is The Worst thing you can do. :Push:It will stimulate a dog's prey drive where they become the prey in this fun game of chance. Yelling comes next, "Fluffy, No! Come back". Chances are your dog really isn't trained to respond to voice commands under FULL FLIGHT and your yelling will only further widen the bond between your dog's Prey Mood and your Pack Drive. :weird:

The best thing you can do is cheerfully call your dog's name and RUN THE OTHER WAY! LOL -- it sounds silly but this will trigger your dog's prey instinct and align it with pack drive, bringing your moods into harmony!!! :P

This is just an example of how differently we are hard-wired from our furry friends. :heart:
 

cili_padi

Looking for Evelyne
Apr 3, 2006
784
1
Land of the Long White Cloud
Our dog went through a phase where he was so aggressive around food that he would grab food, run and eat in a nervous state while staring at us apprehensively. And he would either run or growl if we got too close to him while he was eating.

We did various things to stop the behaviour. We got him a play toy which is a food dispenser, so he could only eat small amounts at a go. I also cut the food into small pieces and fed him with my hands, so he had to learn to take food gently. If he growled, the food disappeared and he got told off.

He is now really good around food. He eats in the kitchen, doesn't mind people walking all around him while he is eating. Lets me take food out of his mouth. (DH has a huge phobia about putting his hand in a dog's mouth, so I do this). He has to do a trick for food, he must be in a down position and cannot move until we give an 'okay'. For treats, he must do one of these, - beg, roll or spin (sometimes he is so excited, he gets the commands mixed up, but he has to repeat until he gets it right).

Best of luck with your pug tr444! I'm sure he will come around, and realise he has to learn to fit in.

I admit that our beagle did some really spiteful things when we first laid down the rules, and it did take about a month of being firm with him before he finally decided it was easier to just follow the rules. We brought in a dog trainer for several lessons, and the books that were recommended, - "Don't shoot the dog" by Karen Pyror and "Culture Clash" by Jean Donaldson are excellent books and really helped.
 

Traci

Crazy for LV
Apr 18, 2006
7,702
9
UPDATE LADIES:

I have spent DAYS watching "The dog whisperer". That Ceaser is amazing!!!! I took all of his tecniques and started applying them and OH MY GOD, do they work!!!!

The dog no longer dominates me, I have taught him that I am above him in the pack. He is following me out the door now, instead of me following him. He is sitting and staying everytime I tell him. I even got him to stop trying to run after my son's bike when he rides by him!!!!
Also, he has to follow my command to sit...before he gets a treat, supper, water, go outside, everything.

This is amazing, this stuff really works!!!!

Thanks to everyone for all your advice!!!
 

me_love_purse

swift convert
O.G.
Jun 15, 2006
4,661
3
UPDATE LADIES:

I have spent DAYS watching "The dog whisperer". That Ceaser is amazing!!!! I took all of his tecniques and started applying them and OH MY GOD, do they work!!!!

The dog no longer dominates me, I have taught him that I am above him in the pack. He is following me out the door now, instead of me following him. He is sitting and staying everytime I tell him. I even got him to stop trying to run after my son's bike when he rides by him!!!!
Also, he has to follow my command to sit...before he gets a treat, supper, water, go outside, everything.

This is amazing, this stuff really works!!!!

Thanks to everyone for all your advice!!!
traci...
i am so happy that the training works out for you :yahoo:
yay....
puppies are cute... especially when they listen to us humans.
 

boxermom

O.G.
Aug 26, 2006
27,084
591
North Carolina
Very good news! And good for you to learn new techniques and apply them consistently--that's hard for me, but it's the best way to train an animal.:yahoo:
 

bagnshoofetish

resist.
O.G.
Feb 12, 2006
33,570
2,978
earth
UPDATE LADIES:

I have spent DAYS watching "The dog whisperer". That Ceaser is amazing!!!! I took all of his tecniques and started applying them and OH MY GOD, do they work!!!!

The dog no longer dominates me, I have taught him that I am above him in the pack. He is following me out the door now, instead of me following him. He is sitting and staying everytime I tell him. I even got him to stop trying to run after my son's bike when he rides by him!!!!
Also, he has to follow my command to sit...before he gets a treat, supper, water, go outside, everything.

This is amazing, this stuff really works!!!!

Thanks to everyone for all your advice!!!

Bravo!