Ok, is this the right place? LOL Anyone good w/ chemistry???

alouette

What the VEEP?
Nov 28, 2006
9,159
7
at CrossFit
Have a question on behalf of my bro:

LOL! I feel so stupid asking this but he's at a loss.

He can't figure out why there's only 6 bonds of NH for 2 moles of NH3.

Anyone? TIA!
 

bagnshoofetish

resist.
O.G.
Feb 12, 2006
33,572
2,987
earth
Let us look at a more complicated example of the formation of a molecule. Just as the energy released by water falling can be captured, we can find ways to capture chemical energy. Let us look at a more complicated reaction: the formation of ammonia. Nitrogen gas (N2) and hydrogen gas (H2) can be made to combine to form NH3, or ammonia gas. As we proceed, look for the answers to these questions: Is the reaction exothermic? How many kilograms of hydrogen are needed to produce one kilogram of ammonia?
[FONT=Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif][SIZE=-1]The reaction is N2 + 3H2 [/SIZE][/FONT][FONT=Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif][SIZE=-1]
[/SIZE][/FONT] [FONT=Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif][SIZE=-1]2NH3[/SIZE][/FONT]
[FONT=Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif][SIZE=-1]This equation says that one mole of N2 requires three moles of H2 for a complete reaction, and this would then yield two moles of NH3. Note that we can also say that one molecule of N2 reacts with three molecules of H2 to yield two molecules of ammonia (NH3). But the table gives energies in units of kcal/mole, which is why it is easier to work with moles. The energy involved in the reaction involving just one or two molecules of ammonia is too small.[/SIZE][/FONT]


Sheesh. Everyone knows that. :rolleyes:






:roflmfao:I love The Google.
 

Christine

Back in 5 minutes..
O.G.
Sep 15, 2006
2,919
4
lmao. :tup:


Let us look at a more complicated example of the formation of a molecule. Just as the energy released by water falling can be captured, we can find ways to capture chemical energy. Let us look at a more complicated reaction: the formation of ammonia. Nitrogen gas (N2) and hydrogen gas (H2) can be made to combine to form NH3, or ammonia gas. As we proceed, look for the answers to these questions: Is the reaction exothermic? How many kilograms of hydrogen are needed to produce one kilogram of ammonia?
[FONT=Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif][SIZE=-1]The reaction is N2 + 3H2 [/SIZE][/FONT][FONT=Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif][SIZE=-1]
[/SIZE][/FONT] [FONT=Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif][SIZE=-1]2NH3[/SIZE][/FONT]
[FONT=Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif][SIZE=-1]This equation says that one mole of N2 requires three moles of H2 for a complete reaction, and this would then yield two moles of NH3. Note that we can also say that one molecule of N2 reacts with three molecules of H2 to yield two molecules of ammonia (NH3). But the table gives energies in units of kcal/mole, which is why it is easier to work with moles. The energy involved in the reaction involving just one or two molecules of ammonia is too small.[/SIZE][/FONT]


Sheesh. Everyone knows that. :rolleyes:






:roflmfao:I love The Google.
 

starryviolet

Member
Jan 10, 2008
1,707
0
N has 5 valence electrons so it is attached to 3 H's and 1 lone pair. so if there are 2 moles of NH3 2 x 3 = 6.
 

alouette

What the VEEP?
Nov 28, 2006
9,159
7
at CrossFit
LOL!!!! Verrrry clear bagnshoo!!!

shopbopchic - Ok, I get that part. Thanks!!!! He's now asking why there's no N bonds?? Make any sense? I did the Lewis structure but not sure how to work it since there's 2 moles?