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PsychoBagLady

Bag & Scarf Crazy
O.G.
Jun 2, 2007
668
67
USA
For tech resumes, always start out with your skills and number of years using them. A bullet list works great. IT hiring managers look at that first. Then, they want to see how you used those skills in your experience. If you have programming AND finance experience, companies will want you because of all the things they need to do in order to cover themselves for the Sarbane Oxley act. If you see you lack experience in some areas, try to incorporate those things into your present job so you can put them on your resume. I remember when I was an admin assistant at a collection agency. I was in school and knew how to program. So, I started writing batch jobs and things like that at work. I know it looked like I was brown nosing to others because my boss at the time loved it and she was a MEAN lady. But, I had plans. LOL I automated a few of their processes and saved the company time and money. Anyway, I put that programming experience on my resume and landed my first programming job. (Wow... back down memory lane.) I hope this helps. Best wishes. I'll be praying for you.
 
May 13, 2007
145
25
38
Northern California
Don't worry, I totally feel you on this one. I graduated last year with a BS in Management Information Systems and since I was working at the bank back then, I got offered a job at a well known brokerage firm. Things went well there, however, the work environment wasn't. I ended up resigning last week and now, I'm back to searching for jobs.

I feel so lost because I went to school for MIS and wish that I can go into my field of study but there is so much competition with all the people who were laid off and have tons of experience or the students from India or China (no offense). I'm just glad that I have my finance background in banking and in the brokerage firm, otherwise, I don't know what I'd do.

Sorry this is long but I needed to vent. I've been feeling so down in the dumps lately about my situation-to make myself feel better, I bought a new LV bag last week =)

All I can tell myself and you also is don't give up. It's not the end of the world and sooner or later, something will come your way.

Cheer up =)
 

singerangel

Member
May 19, 2007
192
0
I had the same trouble when I was looking for a new part time job (I'm still at uni studying for my degree). Eventually, about a month after I applied, I got an offer to go to a recuitment/ interview day for a company I wanted to work at, (I thought they'd just tossed my resume!) and I ended up getting the job. It was the only interview I had had in months! The right job for you is probably right around the corner- wait it out and you'll find it!

Just always be positive and confident! Good Luck!!
 
Jan 25, 2006
25,474
43
Maryland
Thank you all for the encouragement I truely appreciate it :heart:


idvinexpnai vbmenu_register("postmenu_2935368", true); so nice of you to come in and encourage me while you are down in the dumps. Thanks for that :flowers:

PsychoBagLady trying to get into the IT field with little to no experience is VERY tough.The only experience I have with programming is school related and my current job is not related at all to what I want to do which makes my search even harder :sad: thank you for your advice about incorporating needed skills into my current job so I can put them on my resume, but in my current position that is very hard to do. I've never heard of the Sarbane Oxley act I'll have to google it.
Thank you very much for this info I will use it best I can.
 

jewelebeanie

not quite an addict!
Mar 6, 2007
496
0
Someone else mentioned it, but yes always send a hand written thank you note after an interview. I not only send them to the interviewer, but also the HR people that set up the interview. Makes a very good impression.
 

gillianna

O.G.
Dec 27, 2005
8,400
2,156
Have you thought of temp work? I know people who were offered permanent positions after temping for companies.
Good luck.
 

IntlSet

Bonjour!
Jan 29, 2006
12,532
49
Chicago
I have been contacted by a few but seems I don't have the experience they are looking for or the pay is not enough.
The pay is not enough? This raises a red flag for me. I used to be a recruiter and was wary of anyone who said "the pay is not enough" when they have little work experience. Unfortunately, the market is saturated with well-educated, qualified graduates who are willing to work for less than they may believe they deserve. Getting a job is the important thing: negotiating a pay raise or moving to another company that will offer better compensation is always a possibility.

If you've been bringing up compensation at all in your interviews, stop immediately. It should be the last thing you discuss with an employer after you've been extended an offer. Of course, you should make sure that they can pay in the ball-park of what you're looking for.

How much ARE you looking for? Have you asked yourself honestly if you're qualified enough for that kind of salary? I would suggest contacting a head-hunter again after you change your mindset about salary.

Just a few friendly words of advice from a former recruiter.
 
Jan 25, 2006
25,474
43
Maryland
The pay is not enough? This raises a red flag for me. I used to be a recruiter and was wary of anyone who said "the pay is not enough" when they have little work experience. Unfortunately, the market is saturated with well-educated, qualified graduates who are willing to work for less than they may believe they deserve. Getting a job is the important thing: negotiating a pay raise or moving to another company that will offer better compensation is always a possibility.

If you've been bringing up compensation at all in your interviews, stop immediately. It should be the last thing you discuss with an employer after you've been extended an offer. Of course, you should make sure that they can pay in the ball-park of what you're looking for.

How much ARE you looking for? Have you asked yourself honestly if you're qualified enough for that kind of salary? I would suggest contacting a head-hunter again after you change your mindset about salary.

Just a few friendly words of advice from a former recruiter.

ummm dear of course I did not out and say that to the recruiter. She asked me what my salary requirements were I told her and she informed me that the position she had in mind paid several dollars less than what my requirement was. Also this recruiter is the only one who contacted me and the pay was an issue. I am not asking for an insaine amount of money I am trying to stay within my current salary which trust me darling ain't nothing to sing about. As I mentioned earlier I have read all the do's and don't on what to say and not say while interviewing so I am well aware that bringing up a salary before being offered a job is a no no. Salary is important and it has its place to be discussed, I know this. But I am certainly not so desperate for a job that I will take a job paying a very low salary when I know that won't meet my bills, what would be the point? :heart:
 

IntlSet

Bonjour!
Jan 29, 2006
12,532
49
Chicago
ummm dear of course I did not out and say that to the recruiter. She asked me what my salary requirements were I told her and she informed me that the position she had in mind paid several dollars less than what my requirement was. Also this recruiter is the only one who contacted me and the pay was an issue. I am not asking for an insaine amount of money I am trying to stay within my current salary which trust me darling ain't nothing to sing about. As I mentioned earlier I have read all the do's and don't on what to say and not say while interviewing so I am well aware that bringing up a salary before being offered a job is a no no. Salary is important and it has its place to be discussed, I know this. But I am certainly not so desperate for a job that I will take a job paying a very low salary when I know that won't meet my bills, what would be the point? :heart:
Sorry! Didn't mean to make you feel defensive. I guess you're not as hard up for work as I thought you were. Good luck, something will turn up. I've been in your shoes, and it will turn out okay in the end!
 
May 13, 2007
145
25
38
Northern California
Fabulosity, you have an IT degree? I do too. I've thought about taking some classes at a junior college to strengthen up those skills because I would love to get a job in IT but as of right now, I don't think i'd make it. lol.
 

shoulderache

Member
May 24, 2007
1,018
0
Arizona
I totally feel you here! And I wish you the best of luck!

My advice--try to find one of those interview coaches! Best ever! I was an intern at a company that made all of its interns attend a session with an interview/resume coach (we were the guinea pigs--they wanted to see if the program was any good). It was a big help--the coach went over all sorts of things like how to answer various questions and what to do during an interview. Another thing you may want to do is to go down to your school's career center and set up a mock interview--they will interview you for a position and then go over your strengths and weaknesses and things you can do to improve for the next one.

My advice: pre-write answers to basic questions like "what is your greatest weakness" and "what are your strengths" and "how would you handle an assignment here" and the like. Don't list anything on your resume that you did in high school unless you cured cancer or something. Don't be afraid of using small margins on your resume. Tell a short story about yourself/your experiences in every question that you answer.

Best of luck!
 

eliselady

Member
Mar 19, 2007
1,557
0
49
In house recruitment is always tough. In the UK every job has to be advertised internally, but often this means that the manager often know whos/he wants to hire, but goes through the pretence of the interview process. They then hire who they wanted in the first place!

If you can I would make contact with one of the external people who interviewed you. Perhaps one you felt you got on well with? Write a note, or an email so they dont feel they have to reply. Explain your situation and say you are desperate for feedback as to whether your interview style could be improved. I have had such requests and been glad to help, once the hiring process is over. Could you do this in the US?