New puppy

zeeni26

Member
Jan 23, 2014
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SO my dbf and in laws got me a 'surprise' graduation gift ( I over heard my bf talking and got him to 'spill the beans' but he says I have to act surprised when I get him on Aug 4) a maltase puppy. My concern is growing up i was not allowed to have an 'inside' dog as my grandfather was allergic. With maltase puppies being so small is it ok to train them on the 'wee wee' pad and then just throw those out or should I grass train him. Since I live in an apartment do you think the wee wee pad would stink up the place? Any input from experienced dog owners will be appreciated and I will post up pictures of Carter (thats the name I've always wanted to name my dog) when he arrives
 

buzzytoes

Dog Chauffeur
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Jun 7, 2008
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Congrats on your new pup! I always prefer to train my animals to go outside, but I have never lived in an apartment so I'm not sure how easy it is. I'm sure you will get a lot more input.
 

rshelton13

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Mar 27, 2008
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I train to go outside as well. That may be difficult depending on your apartment though. Those wee wee pads gross me out. You will figure out what works for you though
 

*schmoo*

Member
Jul 27, 2008
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I had a maltese while living in an apt. I put the pad in a bathroom for easier cleanup and she was very good about using it. If you take him out regularly, he may become less dependent on the pad and naturally wait 'til he's taken out. That happened when I moved into a house and she eventually stopped using the pad altogether.

Can't wait to see pics of your little guy!
 

hermes_lemming

my little etoupe
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May 5, 2006
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A wee pad is a good way to start training him or her.

When I was growing up in the states, we weren't allowed to have dogs either because my father was allergic to them. However I adopted a small dog with my then bf after college. We lived in a tiny 350 sq foot studio apartment and the wee pad didn't stink up the place.

Good luck and congrats!
 

dorcast

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Jan 1, 2006
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Training in an apartment is a bit tougher. I would read all of the advice about scooping up the dog to get them outside right away, and realize I had to factor in the hallway and waiting for the elevator in my building. However, I did train for outside, and skipped the steps of wee wee pads or paper in the apartment.

One more thing to factor in - since you don't have your own yard, your vet may advise you not to take your dog around other dogs until he has had all of his shots. Since this does take a few weeks, you may want the step of training indoors first. You could use the wee wee pads indoors, and start bringing the pads outside when you want to make that transition.
 

FelixItsHot

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Jul 2, 2014
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The two most important things you need at all times is patience and consistency. Puppies are a handful, and everything is going straight into their mouths. Be prepared to reach in there and get out whatever they try to eat.

And always keep this VERY important thing in mind: A small or tiny dog is NO excuse for aggressive behavior when it gets older. It's NOT cute, it's NOT fun, it's NOT how a well-trained dog should behave. Any aggressive barking, lunging, or biting should be dealt with swiftly, firmly, and consistently. If it's not okay for a larger dog breed to do it, it's not okay for a small dog breed either. A dog is a dog is a dog; normal, healthy behavior is a must and will be key to a long, happy, and healthy life.
 
Oct 6, 2007
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Shopping for Sparkle
The two most important things you need at all times is patience and consistency. Puppies are a handful, and everything is going straight into their mouths. Be prepared to reach in there and get out whatever they try to eat.

And always keep this VERY important thing in mind: A small or tiny dog is NO excuse for aggressive behavior when it gets older. It's NOT cute, it's NOT fun, it's NOT how a well-trained dog should behave. Any aggressive barking, lunging, or biting should be dealt with swiftly, firmly, and consistently. If it's not okay for a larger dog breed to do it, it's not okay for a small dog breed either. A dog is a dog is a dog; normal, healthy behavior is a must and will be key to a long, happy, and healthy life.
^ this! so right! many small dog owners think it's okay when it's so not. my dad's Newf has been attacked by countless small dogs and their owners always brush it off and laugh saying "oh he's just scared because your dog is so big" no excuse!
 

bagnshoofetish

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Feb 12, 2006
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You do plan on walking the little guy at least twice a day, right?

While he is a puppy you may need to take him outside more. Like human babies puppies cannot control their bladder/poop like an older dog can.

And keeping a doggie (or any animal) inside an apartment is fine as long as you plan on taking them outside to a park/play area once in while AND for a good walk every day (2x as stated previously). Doggies need a lot of exercise and discipline first and foremost or you will end up with a nervous dog with pent up energy who will end up misbehaving and destroying things.
 

FelixItsHot

Member
Jul 2, 2014
114
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New York City
Also don't be afraid to leave the puppy in a big crate when you have to leave it alone in your home. It's not cruel. It's actually preferable because they'd feel more secure, and it will prevent your furniture from getting chewed up or peed on.
 

zeeni26

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Jan 23, 2014
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Thank you all for your great advice! My puppy will be arriving on the 10th of August so I will be completely very of school ( I graduate on the 4th of August with my undergrad and have a year to give my lsat and apply to law school) so I will have plenty of time to devote to the little guy. I plan on taking him out at least twice for a walk if not more I'm looking in to harnesses and leashes right now. Felixitshot thank you for letting me know about the crate I have been considering getting one but my bf says its cruel. He has a room for his dogs but since I live in an apartment I don't have the extra room and a crate will be the best option to give him his own space. One more question how do I control the excessive barking should I reward him when he stops barking or punish him when he does bark my boyfriend says that they use to lightly spank their puppies but I don't believe in physical punishment is it ok to just verbally say 'bad dog' will he get the message if I say it in a mean tone?
 

oogiewoogie

Life is good.. :)
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Mar 27, 2007
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Stern verbal command - "NO" may or may not work on a young puppy. We don't spank our dogs, that just teaches them to be afraid of you when you raise your hand. I highly recommend puppy classes, there's a ton of different methods on training (just like child rearing) some techniques people advocate while others don't. You'll have to find a happy medium on what works for you, your puppies personality and situation all together. I think you'll have to get a series of shots first before being able to attend class though, but once you go- your puppy will meet other pups (great for socialization) and you'll be able to ask questions and learn new training/behavioral techniques. Congrats on the new pup!
 

bagnshoofetish

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When your pup is barking at something outside excessively (a couple of barks should be okay I mean that is the way they express warning, talk, etc. you have to let them have a little bit of voice…) stand in front of him and calmly say "quiet" (or whatever cue word you wish to use but be consistent about it). Standing in front of him is "claiming" that space from him and showing him you are in charge. Have him sit and then treat him. The entire time the distraction that was making him bark is still there, sit with him and calmly say "good quiet" while he is quiet. After saying "good quiet" give him a very small treat (like the size of half a penny or so) to teach him that just sitting and observing whatever is out there quietly is what is acceptable. Everyone in the family has to do the same thing though. The minute he is allowed to do what he wants without correction will set you back to the beginning because then the dog will learn that sooner or later, he will get his way because you will give up.
 
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