Is it normal to feel a little nauseous when purchasing an expensive bag?

monicabing

Member
May 18, 2019
40
206
Definitely feel guilty sometimes, so many people with nothing and here I am with a collection of freaking handbags that total tens of thousands.

But also I donate 10% of income and my goal is to retire early from a stressful job and start a non-profit. Bags are kind of a hobby that makes me happy. I think as long as we can easily afford them we should try to enjoy them and not think too much about the rest of it. Life is about balance right?
 

verychic555

Member
Dec 24, 2012
628
292
I really enjoyed this thread and can identify so much with a lot of the answers. I understand the quality over quantity aspect. However, it must be said, that if we were to design and produce a realllyyyyyyy high quality bag by a local, no-name leather-specialist or handbagdesigner, it would hardly cost even 1/5 of a Chanel bag. Even if we were to use the best materials, craftmanship and give him a profit of 100%. What i often recognize is, even if it sounds stupid, the desire to own an expensive designer bag is rooted in the wish to belong to a certain community or social representation of "success". You pay A LOT for the context of the product, the dream that is created within this brands. If we are going for a deeper analysis of the whole context, we can see that luxurylovers are paying to own something that
a) isn't finiancially possible for the person with an average income, if they were not to save a lot (aspect of rarity) "not everbody will wear a chanel bag"
b) represents a lifestyle of wealth, beauty, status, success, the illusion of the BEST craftmanship, artisans, Sewers, materials, packaging, visual merchandising, media placement (Vogue, Elle, Harpers Bazar), pr, distribution, store location, Copywriting, Fashion shows, most famous/best paid models and the list goes on
c) is not an investment in the classical sence (only under very specific circumstances: no wear and tear, timeless model, continued success of the brand and ongoing price increases).
d) is just a material good that hasn't a wide spectrum of functions: from a usage-perspective, it's just supposed to hold your things.

And while i know all these "facts", there is still the bigger part of me that is still drawn to this world. Maybe it is also because for a short period of time, you can escape the true world and a own something desirable, no matter how pretty, talented, intelligent, lucky, social or whatever you feel.
Very well said!
 

lalame

O.G.
Apr 30, 2011
1,781
10,704
Bay Area, SF
All the time. It literally takes me a year to work up the comfort, and I only buy when I’m abroad or something because the lower price makes me feel a little better about it. I try to make it about whether a purchase is practical or adds value, not whether I can afford it or not. Focusing on affordability IMO drives some people to buy frivolous things they regret later. I can “afford” a Bugatti but that would be a ridiculous purchase for my income and lifestyle, ya know? TPF is misleading... the people you see with huge collections could be financially struggling or they could be wildly successful multi millionaires several times over. If you’re not one of those 2 things, don’t normalize their lifestyle.

Sorta related... does anyone feel like as they make more money (aka more things become affordable), they care a little less about material things that add to an image of wealth? I was just talking to my husband about this recently. When I was young in NYC I spent way too much money on designer items to look “acceptable”. Now I feel comfortable no matter how I look, less like I need to “wear” my bank account.
 
Jan 15, 2021
255
1,100
Sorta related... does anyone feel like as they make more money (aka more things become affordable), they care a little less about material things that add to an image of wealth?
Oh, completely.
(In my opinion) We see the amount of money we have in our bank accounts and believe we are able to simply afford anything even if we dont need it. The feel of buying something luxury, the want of feeling like you are part of something (thats essentially way overpriced simply because of it’s name and history) and the $0.79 (assuming this is what they pay per box to order in bulk) cost of Chanel Boxes people receive, a canvas camellia and printed ribbons with a machine made bag inside those boxes makes people “feel and see” the luxury and rich feeling of the buy but much less know they are not getting their money’s worth. Lets say nobody knew Chanel, and the makers handmade these items, sold them in Tjmaxx, you think people are to be lining up outside to search for these bags, no, right? This is all a marketing strategy by the company and arent afraid to raise the prices on the bags, they know they see the words “fool” on customer’s foreheads because they know people are willing to purchase a bag worth more than $5k when it’s really worth 90% less, but at this point im kinda striving off your question lol sorry, so yes, in some cases these situations are opposite, in my case, the more money i earn, the more reason for me to keep saving my money. The less i see the amount of money i have, the more chance i will not touch it. Which is why i never carry any cash :lol:
( i hope i answered your question! :biggrin: )
 
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Kuschelnudde

Member
Jun 14, 2019
420
2,742
Lets say nobody knew Chanel, and the makers handmade these items, sold them in Tjmaxx, you think people are to be lining up outside to search for these bags, no, right?
I think that this is quite a common argument but I think that it is misguided. When buying designer, it is most certainly about logo and the history. Quality and design of the bag need to be ''good enough'' or appealing, no one realistically expects them to be surrounded by an invisible armor. The history of the bag and the fashion house is part of the appeal and if you buy the bag, you also buy into the fashion house in order to be associated with it. So no, you wouldn't buy them because their design justifies the price but rather because design/history/aspiration work together.

Yes, classic flaps/reissues are technically 'boring' because their base design has been endlessly copied and in our consumer culture we have become so accustomed to it. However, I think appreciating classics (also with regards to furniture and lamps) is quite an acquired taste. Classics always appear ordinary at first glance and either you appreciate their simplicity and relevance or you don't. A TK Max bag that looks similar is still just a copy.

Sorry for rambling... ;D
 
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vivy_tran

Member
Jul 29, 2019
364
1,195
Bay Area, CA
All the time. It literally takes me a year to work up the comfort, and I only buy when I’m abroad or something because the lower price makes me feel a little better about it. I try to make it about whether a purchase is practical or adds value, not whether I can afford it or not. Focusing on affordability IMO drives some people to buy frivolous things they regret later. I can “afford” a Bugatti but that would be a ridiculous purchase for my income and lifestyle, ya know? TPF is misleading... the people you see with huge collections could be financially struggling or they could be wildly successful multi millionaires several times over. If you’re not one of those 2 things, don’t normalize their lifestyle.

Sorta related... does anyone feel like as they make more money (aka more things become affordable), they care a little less about material things that add to an image of wealth? I was just talking to my husband about this recently. When I was young in NYC I spent way too much money on designer items to look “acceptable”. Now I feel comfortable no matter how I look, less like I need to “wear” my bank account.
Hmm I wouldn’t generalize why certain groups of people spend on luxuries. I can’t say for all wealthy people, but I will say that I know a small group of wealthy people (50-150M+ networth) fairly well since we’re all cousins. Some of them shop at TJ Maxx/Walmart, but spend lots of money on exotics cars, watches, and other rare collectibles. If you see them on the street, you would think they’re just normal people. But when you get invited to their house, it’s completely a different world.

Other cousins wear luxury all around like they’re walking out of a fashion runway, have maids, first class fights, and get chauffeured in bentleys. Some of these wealthy people are siblings/relatives and came from same upbringing while others are born wealthy. What I will say is that my cousins who are self-made, tend to spend more on luxuries and living their life to the max while others who inherit tend to hide it. I’m guessing those who made it, they are more confident that they can make money again if they lose a big chunk of their assets while those inherit haven’t done much to become rich. I do see mindsets of “work hard, play hard” or “you can’t bring all your money with when you die, might as well enjoy some of it now while you’re still alive”.

Anyway, there’s a diverse group of people out there who have so many reasons why people buy luxury items. Some just love the fashion house, history, quality, etc while others just wear to show off. But what happened to buying things because you simply love it, you can afford it, it’s not hurting anyone, and it has value to you? The pandemic is still here. No one is traveling and going out to meet others like they did in the past to show off, yet I still see a lot of luxury purchases posted on TPF. I find it silly to buy luxuries to show off online to people you don’t really know..
 

lalame

O.G.
Apr 30, 2011
1,781
10,704
Bay Area, SF
Hmm I wouldn’t generalize why certain groups of people spend on luxuries. I can’t say for all wealthy people, but I will say that I know a small group of wealthy people (50-150M+ networth) fairly well since we’re all cousins. Some of them shop at TJ Maxx/Walmart, but spend lots of money on exotics cars, watches, and other rare collectibles. If you see them on the street, you would think they’re just normal people. But when you get invited to their house, it’s completely a different world.

Other cousins wear luxury all around like they’re walking out of a fashion runway, have maids, first class fights, and get chauffeured in bentleys. Some of these wealthy people are siblings/relatives and came from same upbringing while others are born wealthy. What I will say is that my cousins who are self-made, tend to spend more on luxuries and living their life to the max while others who inherit tend to hide it. I’m guessing those who made it, they are more confident that they can make money again if they lose a big chunk of their assets while those inherit haven’t done much to become rich. I do see mindsets of “work hard, play hard” or “you can’t bring all your money with when you die, might as well enjoy some of it now while you’re still alive”.

Anyway, there’s a diverse group of people out there who have so many reasons why people buy luxury items. Some just love the fashion house, history, quality, etc while others just wear to show off. But what happened to buying things because you simply love it, you can afford it, it’s not hurting anyone, and it has value to you? The pandemic is still here. No one is traveling and going out to meet others like they did in the past to show off, yet I still see a lot of luxury purchases posted on TPF. I find it silly to buy luxuries to show off online to people you don’t really know..
Not generalizing, just asking about other people's experiences!
 

ASA2018

Member
Dec 8, 2018
26
88
I really enjoyed this thread and can identify so much with a lot of the answers. I understand the quality over quantity aspect. However, it must be said, that if we were to design and produce a realllyyyyyyy high quality bag by a local, no-name leather-specialist or handbagdesigner, it would hardly cost even 1/5 of a Chanel bag. Even if we were to use the best materials, craftmanship and give him a profit of 100%. What i often recognize is, even if it sounds stupid, the desire to own an expensive designer bag is rooted in the wish to belong to a certain community or social representation of "success". You pay A LOT for the context of the product, the dream that is created within this brands. If we are going for a deeper analysis of the whole context, we can see that luxurylovers are paying to own something that
a) isn't finiancially possible for the person with an average income, if they were not to save a lot (aspect of rarity) "not everbody will wear a chanel bag"
b) represents a lifestyle of wealth, beauty, status, success, the illusion of the BEST craftmanship, artisans, Sewers, materials, packaging, visual merchandising, media placement (Vogue, Elle, Harpers Bazar), pr, distribution, store location, Copywriting, Fashion shows, most famous/best paid models and the list goes on
c) is not an investment in the classical sence (only under very specific circumstances: no wear and tear, timeless model, continued success of the brand and ongoing price increases).
d) is just a material good that hasn't a wide spectrum of functions: from a usage-perspective, it's just supposed to hold your things.

And while i know all these "facts", there is still the bigger part of me that is still drawn to this world. Maybe it is also because for a short period of time, you can escape the true world and a own something desirable, no matter how pretty, talented, intelligent, lucky, social or whatever you feel.
I think you really hit the nail on the head with this post. Our love, appreciation and dedication to luxury stems from a multifaceted desire from within and there is no one reason to explain it. We choose what we wish to afford and based on what our priorities are. :smile:
 

misokute

O.G.
Feb 24, 2011
78
57
I think that this is quite a common argument but I think that it is misguided. When buying designer, it is most certainly about logo and the history. Quality and design of the bag need to be ''good enough'' or appealing, no one realistically expects them to be surrounded by an invisible armor. The history of the bag and the fashion house is part of the appeal and if you buy the bag, you also buy into the fashion house in order to be associated with it. So no, you wouldn't buy them because their design justifies the price but rather because design/history/aspiration work together.

Yes, classic flaps/reissues are technically 'boring' because their base design has been endlessly copied and in our consumer culture we have become so accustomed to it. However, I think appreciating classics (also with regards to furniture and lamps) is quite an acquired taste. Classics always appear ordinary at first glance and either you appreciate their simplicity and relevance or you don't. A TK Max bag that looks similar is still just a copy.

Sorry for rambling... ;D
I totally agree with this! It’s the intrinsic value of the brand attached to these items. I’m not saying we buy things purely for the brand - but we are definitely willing to pay this premium and buy into luxury brands because there is an intangible perceived value attached to it.
 

XOXO_Valerie

Member
Jul 15, 2020
17
108
I definitely feel guilty, but I also like to put it in perspective. I'm not a SUPER high earner so nothing I could ever do in terms of donations is going to make even a small dent into systemic poverty and homelessness. If I spent all the shopping money I've spent the past year buying hotel rooms for the unhoused in my city, the same people would just be homeless again tomorrow and I would've housed only an extremely small fraction of those in need for just that night. Individual charity is still super important to me, but these issues are solved by systemic change (usually legislative change, tax change, systemic health care change etc) so I focus on supporting those actions while still occasionally treating myself.
 
Jan 15, 2021
255
1,100
I think that this is quite a common argument but I think that it is misguided. When buying designer, it is most certainly about logo and the history. Quality and design of the bag need to be ''good enough'' or appealing, no one realistically expects them to be surrounded by an invisible armor. The history of the bag and the fashion house is part of the appeal and if you buy the bag, you also buy into the fashion house in order to be associated with it. So no, you wouldn't buy them because their design justifies the price but rather because design/history/aspiration work together.

Yes, classic flaps/reissues are technically 'boring' because their base design has been endlessly copied and in our consumer culture we have become so accustomed to it. However, I think appreciating classics (also with regards to furniture and lamps) is quite an acquired taste. Classics always appear ordinary at first glance and either you appreciate their simplicity and relevance or you don't. A TK Max bag that looks similar is still just a copy.

Sorry for rambling... ;D
Lol it’s ok! I love hearing people’s input :smile:
I do agree, as i stated:
(thats essentially way overpriced simply because of it’s name and history)
Although i also do find Classic Flaps abit boring myself, but i do see how people like them mainly because of how timeless and simple/classic they are. I dont mind the reissues. I find reissues to be great for people who dont necessarily want to have the CC on their bag, less showy.?:smile:
I myself have this one: 1615493531364.jpeg
And love it. I believe this is a Jumbo Reissue Tweed Flap with Leather Strap. I don't exactly know the official name of it but it definitely is shaped and has features of a Classic Flap.

I’ll stop here. I don't want to strive away from the thread’s topic :lol:
This thread really is great.:tup:
 
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verychic555

Member
Dec 24, 2012
628
292
All the time. It literally takes me a year to work up the comfort, and I only buy when I’m abroad or something because the lower price makes me feel a little better about it. I try to make it about whether a purchase is practical or adds value, not whether I can afford it or not. Focusing on affordability IMO drives some people to buy frivolous things they regret later. I can “afford” a Bugatti but that would be a ridiculous purchase for my income and lifestyle, ya know? TPF is misleading... the people you see with huge collections could be financially struggling or they could be wildly successful multi millionaires several times over. If you’re not one of those 2 things, don’t normalize their lifestyle.

Sorta related... does anyone feel like as they make more money (aka more things become affordable), they care a little less about material things that add to an image of wealth? I was just talking to my husband about this recently. When I was young in NYC I spent way too much money on designer items to look “acceptable”. Now I feel comfortable no matter how I look, less like I need to “wear” my bank account.
That is a good question. Like others have stated, I don’t think that there is one answer that covers everyone. When I bought my first Chanel bag, the SAs at the luxury department store gathered to see us buy it. I am not gonna lie that felt REALLY good. Whenever I carried one of my bags I used to feel “great”. Why? Maybe because like a previous poster stated, you escape your current reality to a “better” one. I was going through some difficult times feeling really down. Now I feel I don’t need that from people anymore. I’m not Uber rich but I feel I don’t need to prove anything to anyone. I guess to answer your question, maybe in the beginning you buy expensive things to show that you made it and to enjoy things that were unattainable. Then as time goes on you don’t feel that need anymore. But also I’m assuming that the Uber rich still spend on something they like. When my dad was a professor overseas, he had the privilege to occasionally teach the kids of the king of the country he was in. I remember him saying that the daughter of the king did not wear any jewelry at all, and if you don’t know her, you wouldn’t think she was “rich”. But I’m sure when you look at what she owns, and the things she buys, they will have a hefty price tag attached to them. To sum up, I’m all about spending wisely and helping the less fortunate, but I’m human too and want to enjoy some of my money while I’m still “alive and well”.
 

Gabel

Member
Dec 27, 2019
195
563
I feel sick every time! Recently decided to start selling some of my LV and Gucci bags. Was a Little shocked to see I get Max 35-40% of the price I paid - also they are new, some of them even never worn.
Any recommendations where to sell best? Thank you
 

Jellybean111

Member
Jan 28, 2016
20
100
I have over 15 Chanel bags, plus 10+ slgs. I love Chanel. It’s my only hobby. I don’t do much. I don’t spend money on clothes, I don’t buy makeup, I stay home a lot, and live a simple life other than my Chanel bags. I’m grateful for my collection and it took awhile to get here. as long as I don’t empty out my savings and retirement to buy them, I’m okay.