Hunter Boots Buffer Spray not Helping on Oxidization Marks

Valeriee

Member
Jul 6, 2011
426
38
Last spring I bought a pair of Huntress Hunter boots with the glossy finish. Yesterday, I took them out for the first time and I noticed that they have the oxidization marks on them. I picked up a bottle of the original buffer spray that is supposed to help make them go away but it's not helping at all. Any advice? These boots feel like a total waste of money at the moment. They look terrible. Thanks in advance for your help.
 
Feb 23, 2008
311
3
Toronto, Canada
You might try some olive oil. Some others on the forum have recommended it and it seemed to work for them. If only for a short period of time. Some of them reported that it worked indefinitely it seems. It's worth a shot. I just bought a pair of Hunters on Thursday with the glossy finish and that's what I will try if it does "bloom" (white marks) as they call it.
 
Feb 23, 2008
311
3
Toronto, Canada
Last spring I bought a pair of Huntress Hunter boots with the glossy finish. Yesterday, I took them out for the first time and I noticed that they have the oxidization marks on them. I picked up a bottle of the original buffer spray that is supposed to help make them go away but it's not helping at all. Any advice? These boots feel like a total waste of money at the moment. They look terrible. Thanks in advance for your help.
Oops! I forgot to quote you. See my post above (about the Hunter boot spray) :smile:
 

elisian

vintage queen
Oct 16, 2014
616
7
Portland, OR
Wait, does this happen on gloss boots too? I have them and they've never "bloomed" on me thru all kinds of humidity changes. Or are you talking about small waxy scuffs?
 

Valeriee

Member
Jul 6, 2011
426
38
Wait, does this happen on gloss boots too? I have them and they've never "bloomed" on me thru all kinds of humidity changes. Or are you talking about small waxy scuffs?


It did happen on high gloss boots. There is no waxy residue - it basically looks like patches of random grey spots. I called the actual company and they told me that if the buffer spray isn't working on them that means that it's a defective pair. As long as I bought them less than a year ago, I can get them exchanged for the same pair. The store where I purchased them was deceptive and didn't inform me of the possibility at first. I only found out when I called the company. The store kept telling me that the warranty doesn't cover blooming issues when in fact it does.
 

elisian

vintage queen
Oct 16, 2014
616
7
Portland, OR
It did happen on high gloss boots. There is no waxy residue - it basically looks like patches of random grey spots. I called the actual company and they told me that if the buffer spray isn't working on them that means that it's a defective pair. As long as I bought them less than a year ago, I can get them exchanged for the same pair. The store where I purchased them was deceptive and didn't inform me of the possibility at first. I only found out when I called the company. The store kept telling me that the warranty doesn't cover blooming issues when in fact it does.
Hunter's policy up to 1 year is def great - I'm glad it worked out! :smile: But, word to the wise, I once bought a pair of their riding boot style, which were some $40 more than Original, and they ripped at the sole due to shoddy construction the 10th or maybe 20th time I wore them -- right around 13 months. (It turns out the non-classic styles, with thinner and non-unibody shapes, are simply a lot less sturdy than Original/Huntress.)

I called the company and they were like, "can't help you... over 12 months!" They were also less friendly because I bought from a boutique -- an authorized one of course, but a little store that mostly sold designer casual dresses and was NOT interested to hear an old product was defective. Is that what happened to you?
 

Valeriee

Member
Jul 6, 2011
426
38
Hunter's policy up to 1 year is def great - I'm glad it worked out! :smile: But, word to the wise, I once bought a pair of their riding boot style, which were some $40 more than Original, and they ripped at the sole due to shoddy construction the 10th or maybe 20th time I wore them -- right around 13 months. (It turns out the non-classic styles, with thinner and non-unibody shapes, are simply a lot less sturdy than Original/Huntress.)

I called the company and they were like, "can't help you... over 12 months!" They were also less friendly because I bought from a boutique -- an authorized one of course, but a little store that mostly sold designer casual dresses and was NOT interested to hear an old product was defective. Is that what happened to you?


The store from which I purchased the boots is also an authorized retailer of Hunter boots. It is a small retailer that specializes in a variety of designer brands. When I first called them and described the problem, they only offered to help me clean them. They didn't inform me that I can exchange them if they were purchased less than a year ago. When I called the company and got this information, I called them again and they agreed to do it albeit reluctantly. I don't have the original receipt on hand, so I'm going to show them a bank statement. It might turn out to be a bit of a battle. I was quite annoyed with the manager of this store, so I called the same store in a neighboring city and the assistant manager there informed me that a bank statement will suffice to make the exchange. If the manager here decides to play games with me, I will go to the other store. The customer service there is much better because it is a metropolitan city, so they have a lot more business.
 

elisian

vintage queen
Oct 16, 2014
616
7
Portland, OR
The store from which I purchased the boots is also an authorized retailer of Hunter boots. It is a small retailer that specializes in a variety of designer brands. When I first called them and described the problem, they only offered to help me clean them. They didn't inform me that I can exchange them if they were purchased less than a year ago. When I called the company and got this information, I called them again and they agreed to do it albeit reluctantly. I don't have the original receipt on hand, so I'm going to show them a bank statement. It might turn out to be a bit of a battle. I was quite annoyed with the manager of this store, so I called the same store in a neighboring city and the assistant manager there informed me that a bank statement will suffice to make the exchange. If the manager here decides to play games with me, I will go to the other store. The customer service there is much better because it is a metropolitan city, so they have a lot more business.
Woah, you could be describing my experience EXACTLY. You didn't buy from the Urban Chic outside DC, did you? xD

Maybe it's just a common Hunter's MO - they make themselves look much more "chic" rather than functional/boring (eg like an Sperry's duck boot or, worse, something from REI) by placing stuff at boutiques that otherwise sell Alice + Olivia and Theory and pretty much the whole Shoshanna catalog.
 

Valeriee

Member
Jul 6, 2011
426
38
Woah, you could be describing my experience EXACTLY. You didn't buy from the Urban Chic outside DC, did you? xD

Maybe it's just a common Hunter's MO - they make themselves look much more "chic" rather than functional/boring (eg like an Sperry's duck boot or, worse, something from REI) by placing stuff at boutiques that otherwise sell Alice + Olivia and Theory and pretty much the whole Shoshanna catalog.


I bought from a different boutique; however, I guess that most of these smaller-sized retailers have a similar philosophy. I'm going into my store on Monday to make the exchange. If they give me a hard time, I'm going to the store in the other city. If everything works out, I'm going to try to use the new pair as often as possible in the next little while because I want to be sure that the buffer spray will actually work on the blooming marks when they begin to appear. The company made it clear to me that if the buffer spray doesn't work, the boots are defective, and that retailers should make this clear to customers.


I wanted to get a pair of these boots for my mother as well because this time of the year can be really rainy around here, and she's always getting all her good shoes wet. With leather, once it gets wet, it sometimes doesn't feel the same anymore. Under these circumstances, though, I don't know what to do. I definitely have to get this situation taken care of before I rush out to get another pair.
 

Valeriee

Member
Jul 6, 2011
426
38
I finally went to get the boots exchanged today. I ended up exchanging for a pair of tall non-glossy Hunters with adjustable straps on the back. To my surprise, all of the glossy Huntress boots that the store had in stock were blooming and when the SA tried cleaning one of the pairs, her results were not much better than my attempts at home on the pair that I had brought back. She suggested that the non-glossy ones are easier to deal with in this regard. Supposedly, the spray works better on them, and the blooming process is slower. I decided that my Mom will get to keep this new pair because they will be of more use to her at the moment, and I'm going to watch how things unfold for her before I rush out to get another pair for myself.
 

klj

O.G.
Jul 27, 2009
6,879
1
Portland, OR.
I purchased a pr .of Black glossy ones from Nordstrom's last year. Just took them out of the box and they do have some gray patches. It's over a year for me..so I tried the olive oil approach and it did work pretty well. I'm guessing if I have more issues I will probably take them back to Nordie's...they do have a pretty good return policy and hope it will apply to these :smile:
 

Valeriee

Member
Jul 6, 2011
426
38
I purchased a pr .of Black glossy ones from Nordstrom's last year. Just took them out of the box and they do have some gray patches. It's over a year for me..so I tried the olive oil approach and it did work pretty well. I'm guessing if I have more issues I will probably take them back to Nordie's...they do have a pretty good return policy and hope it will apply to these :smile:


Did the olive oil remove most of the marks? I tried it as well on the initial glossy boots that I had, and it didn't help much.


Since these boots have become a bit of a fashion staple in the past years, there should be a warning message on the box informing customers that the blooming can be quite severe. I was under the impression that this would be a sporadic issue that could easily be handled with the Hunter buffer spray. Hopefully, this will be true for the new non-glossy ones.


I was wondering whether the Burberry rain boots also have the same problem? Does anybody have an opinion on them?
 
Last edited:

klj

O.G.
Jul 27, 2009
6,879
1
Portland, OR.
Did the olive oil remove most of the marks? I tried it as well on the initial glossy boots that I had, and it didn't help much.


Since these boots have become a bit of a fashion staple in the past years, there should be a warning message on the box informing customers that the blooming can be quite severe. I was under the impression that this would be a sporadic issue that could easily be handled with the Hunter buffer spray. Hopefully, this will be true for the new non-glossy ones.


I was wondering whether the Burberry rain boots also have the same problem? Does anybody have an opinion on them?
It took most of it off/enough that I could barely see it...I was in a hurry to wear them that day...but really need to work on it a bit more.