Help! I hate my husband's cat!

KittyKat65

O.G.
Feb 27, 2007
4,665
2,642
Austin, Texas
When I say I hate her, I am understating the issue. I despise the very core of her being. My husband thinks the sun shines out of her. She has been the bane of my existence for 14 years and I am hoping that her days are numbered. Every time my husband travels (very frequently) she craps on our bed. He is in Dallas tonight and she crapped on the bed and when I found her and grabbed her she bit me. Not just a little bite, but 2 bandaids because the first one had so much blood bite. Is their any advice anyone can give to make it possible for me to deal with this thing until she dies? I think a lot of my problem with her is that my husband is so weird about her. He is so devoted to her that it makes him blind to how evil she it. Our son (6 years old) can't even pet her without hubby saying "be gentle" or "don't scare her" - he coddles her to the point where it's sickening. This cat-monster is also a retaliation puker and will vomit almost on cue if she is reprimanded (I have light beige carpet, so you can imagine how much I love this aspect of her "personality"). Do I just wait it out until she is pushing up daisies or is there a way of dealing with her? 14 is old for a cat, isn't it?

On a separate note, is Neosporin enough for a cat bite?
 
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Miss Kris

Member
Jan 23, 2009
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Cats can sense when people don't like them / are scared of them and will act accordingly. She likely sees you as a threat and treats you accordingly. Usually if you ingore a cat, they hate it, and will try to get your attention eventually.. that may give you back the upper hand against her. As for her age, cats can live to be 20+.

Is she an outdoor cat / does she have her rabies vaccine? If she is up to date on shots, then yes, neosporin will be fine. If not, you should see a doctor to be sure.
 

macska

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Sep 19, 2008
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For the cat bite, I would recommend seeing a doctor. I've had cats my whole life and I would go to the doctor if ever I got bit, shots up-to-date or not.
http://www.thecatsite.com/general/catbites.html

As for the behavior, cats are very sensitive and in-tune with how people feel. They will sense fear, anger, sadness, etc. Cats are also highly independent, so letting her be and simply making sure she has food, water, and a clean litter box will go a long way.

The pooping on the bed is the cat showing she is unhappy that her master (i.e. your husband) has left her. She is pooping on a place that she knows is personal to him to show this; it isn't you per say, you just happen to share this bed with her master. And yes, she can sense your apprehension towards her, so best to just ignore her and let her be.

As for age, purebreds tend to live shorter lives than mixed breeds. My last two cats (mixes breeds) lived to 18 and 16 respectively, but each cat is different, so who knows how many more years yours has.
 

ILuvShopping

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Jun 4, 2007
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i don't have any suggestions on how to deal with her, except she is probably very aware that you dislike her.

when your DH leaves, maybe you should keep the door to your bedroom shut so that she can't get in there and do her business on the bed. that's at least one way to keep it from happening.

and yes cat bites can sometimes cause issues, however if it's an inside cat and you've cleaned it fairly well, it should be fine. i dont' think all cat bites warrant an immediate trip to the doctor. i've been bitten countless times by my cat, on the arm, hand, legs, face, ears and i just clean it with soap and water and i've never had any issues of infection.
however my friend's dad was bitten by one of their cats (which was an outside cat) and his whole arm swelled up.
 

KittyKat65

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Feb 27, 2007
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Austin, Texas
Thanks everyone. Yes, she is an indoor cat and has never even been outside and is up to date on shots. I cleaned the wound with antibacterial soap immediately and then applied Neosporin and it looks OK today. I am on antibiotics for a sinus infection already, so these will probably help any bacteria. It's funny because I usually keep all the bedroom doors closed, but my son let her in by accident and I could not get her out from under the bed and forgot about her. Grrrr.
 

bnjj

Jovi Junkie
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Apr 20, 2007
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Well, for one, I'd keep the bedroom door closed when the hubby's away. She may poop elsewhere but at least it's not on the bed.
 

chessmont

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Aug 22, 2006
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CA
be careful and monitor that bite - if the area swells at all get to doctor. Cats mouths are pretty dirty and sometime you get an anaerobic bacterial infection (does not need air to exist, so can happen underneath a closed-up wound). I had one on a finger and it was awful. Needed antibiotics from the doctor.
 

pollinilove

Member
Mar 6, 2007
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cold
did you tell your husband she poops on the bed ? im sorry for you could she stay in the garage till husband gets back or is that not good idea ? put her food and water and cat box in there . or the basement . i love my cats so i do not know how you feel but i do feel bad that your cat is doing all this to you
 

KittyKat65

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Feb 27, 2007
4,665
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Austin, Texas
Right now she is locked up in the laundry room with her box and food and water. She has been in there since last night. If it was up to me she would stay there until her ultimate demise...
 

lorihmatthews

A taste for the arts
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Oct 7, 2006
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Well, she definitely bit you because you grabbed her -- I don't think you should be surprised by her behavior. Cats and dogs have very short memories, so she probably didn't associate pooping on the bed with you being mad. She just saw you as randomly attacking her for nothing.

She is pooping on the bed because she's mad at your husband, not you. My previous cat used to pee on the bed if I went away. I resorted to closing the bedroom door or putting a plastic dropcloth on the bed to protect the bedding.

I don't think locking her up in the laundry room is effective or kind, for that matter.
 

Miss Kris

Member
Jan 23, 2009
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Maryland
^^ ITA. Cats have a memory of 15 minutes and dogs have a memory of 5 minutes. The cat was probably upset that she was left behind, and as she was sulking...you went to grab her and she reacted. Cats usually don't like being bothered unless they come up to you first. I also don't think locking her up is going to work. She will get even more upset. If you just ignore her, she will ignore you. If she comes up to you, she likely won't bite you. They bite when they feel threatened.
 

sdkitty

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Jan 16, 2006
27,338
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San Diego
I'd lock her out of the bedroom (as you said you usually do). My DH (more often) and I have been bitten and scratched many times by out indoor/outdoor cat. We just clean it with soap and water and put Neosporin (and a bandaid if wound is small enough) on it.
As for life span, my oldest kitty lived to be 18 so you may a have a few years to go. Best to try to ignore her since your DH loves her so much. I had to laugh as this reminded me of my MIL.
 

Miss Kris

Member
Jan 23, 2009
7,713
1
Maryland
I'd lock her out of the bedroom (as you said you usually do). My DH (more often) and I have been bitten and scratched many times by out indoor/outdoor cat. We just clean it with soap and water and put Neosporin (and a bandaid if wound is small enough) on it.
As for life span, my oldest kitty lived to be 18 so you may a have a few years to go. Best to try to ignore her since your DH loves her so much. I had to laugh as this reminded me of my MIL.
Are you comparing the way she feels about her cat to the way you feel about your MIL?! LOL :nuts: