HELP! DOG diagnosed with Lyme Disease

OneNJen

<-- Changed user ID
O.G.
Aug 9, 2007
232
0
Baltimore, MD
Hi All!

A few weeks ago I wrote becuase my dog had a raging ear infection. In all my years of dog ownership, I've never had a dog with that problem, so I wanted to know your experiences.

Well, today I took the dog back for his follow-up visit. While he was there, the vet suggested doing his yearly exam and vaccinations. Everything seemed fine, but while I was out, the vet called and left a message saying that the bloodwork came back positive for Lyme Disease!!!

By the time I got the message, the office was closed, so I haven't been able to speak to the vet but I am BEYOND freaked out and worried. I lost a dog a little over 4 years ago due to cancer, and I am not prepared to go through another serious illness, especially with this dog since he's only four years old...

So, anyone have experience and can shed some light on this for me?
 

aklein

Member
Dec 30, 2007
10,683
2
Generally, what will happen is your vet will prescribe antibiotics for your dog. Most likely doxycycline for about three days. It is imperative that you give your dog the full treatment, even if he appears better after a day or so. Generally dogs tolerate the antibiotic really well and prognosis is good. Your dog should be feeling better after this first round of treatment. However, because it is a chronic disease, your dog may experience flare ups from time to time. So most likely, your vet will prescribe antibiotics when these flare ups occur. Good luck. Your doggie will be fine with treatment.
When I was working in the veterinary clinic Lyme diseas was quite common. I lived just outside of Philadelphia at the time. To others that may read this thread, even if you just take your dog outside for walks, please get the Lyme vaccine. For the OP, because your dog is positive, you can't get the Lyme vaccine.
 

lizavet8

"Ruffian"
O.G.
May 3, 2007
1,231
73
Lonesome Dove
Please talk to your vet as soon as possible-Lyme is very treatable, but really, treatments and information should come from your veterinarian, who actually sees the dog.