Got laid off....Need advice about submitting resume in person!

Crystalina

O.G.
Mar 22, 2007
2,193
16
Hello!

I am in need of advice regarding my new job search.

On Monday evening, I was let go of my job as a Director of Education for a supplemental education business.

I kind of sensed this coming, so I had actually been applying to jobs for several weeks before I was actually let go. I am planning on applying to some more retail jobs in person---just to tie me over until I can find a teaching position.

But here's my question....

About 2 weeks ago I applied online to two different teaching positions. (I applied to each of them on July 15). The first job closes on August 10, the second one on August 14. I am considering printing out my resume, cover letter and references and actually driving to eack of these two schools to submit my credentials IN PERSON.

Is this a good idea that might give me an ''edge'' over other candidates, or is it a bad idea since I already applied online? I'm just concerned that my resume might be stuck in some database and overlooked.

Something else....neither job posting encourages applying in person, this is just some idea I came up with out of desperation of needing (and truly wanting) one of these jobs.

Your comments and opinions welcome.

Thanks!!!
 

redney

Lovin' Life!
O.G.
Apr 21, 2006
13,771
3,494
I'm sorry to hear you lost your job and I remember your thread in the Money subforum too.

I'm a corporate recruiter - have been in the field for years for both large and small companies.

I don't mean to sound negative; instead, I'd like to share perspective to help you set your expectations of what may occur if you do this. It's quite common these days for job seekers to come to the company's place of business in person to hand deliver their resume and of course, hoping to have a quick face-to-face with someone in HR/recruiting responsible for the position

But, depending on the size of the company, you may not be able to speak with anyone in HR; at larger companies, the person at the reception desk may instruct you to leave your resume with him/her and they will forward it to the appropriate person. They are usually told to do this, since someone in HR or recruitment at the company may not be available to come out and meet with the number of unannounced job seekers in person.

With companies receiving hundreds (or even thousands) of resumes for posted openings, the HR staff is usually jammed up during the day doing phone and in-person interviews, and having meetings with their hiring managers, etc.

Additionally, again depending on the size of the company, many HR staff are geographically dispersed and may not even be based in the office where the position is to be based.

A better strategy would be to find out the name of the person responsible for hiring for the position and call him/her to inquire about your status and ask if you could come in at a certain time to drop off your resume. Chances are they may say "no" for the latter, but it never hurts to ask!

Good luck!!
 
May 15, 2008
1,085
1
USA
I'm sorry to hear that you got laid off. =(

For large or small companies, I would apply in person if they actually accept it that way. Just follow the golden rule of course: make a good first impression by having a great resume and a professional look.

Many companies now expect you to submit applications online as it decreases the time-to-hire. I would actually recommend you applying both in person and online.

When you apply online, depending on the job and place you are applying for, make sure you customize your resume to the position. Try to put in a lot of key words they might scan for if you submit online. =P My human resources professor told me they don't always manually look through your resumes when it's a big company so they scan instead.

Also, you might find that applying at a place you enjoy to frequent might be fun too! And I find that small companies (mainly ma&pa's) tend to be friendlier. =P just my 2cents.
 

SWlife

For the love of beautiful things
O.G.
Oct 18, 2006
15,229
2,199
New Mexico
I'm so sorry about the layoff.
I would take my resume in person as well. Can't hurt.
 

ProfNot

Sylvie Guillem fan
O.G.
May 10, 2006
2,553
72
danceland
I'm sorry to hear you lost your job and I remember your thread in the Money subforum too.

I'm a corporate recruiter - have been in the field for years for both large and small companies.

I don't mean to sound negative; instead, I'd like to share perspective to help you set your expectations of what may occur if you do this. It's quite common these days for job seekers to come to the company's place of business in person to hand deliver their resume and of course, hoping to have a quick face-to-face with someone in HR/recruiting responsible for the position

But, depending on the size of the company, you may not be able to speak with anyone in HR; at larger companies, the person at the reception desk may instruct you to leave your resume with him/her and they will forward it to the appropriate person. They are usually told to do this, since someone in HR or recruitment at the company may not be available to come out and meet with the number of unannounced job seekers in person.

With companies receiving hundreds (or even thousands) of resumes for posted openings, the HR staff is usually jammed up during the day doing phone and in-person interviews, and having meetings with their hiring managers, etc.

Additionally, again depending on the size of the company, many HR staff are geographically dispersed and may not even be based in the office where the position is to be based.

A better strategy would be to find out the name of the person responsible for hiring for the position and call him/her to inquire about your status and ask if you could come in at a certain time to drop off your resume. Chances are they may say "no" for the latter, but it never hurts to ask!

Good luck!!

ITA with above, especially the last paragraph and......

I used to be in charge of hiring at a small company. Because we were small, it meant that being down only one person meant I was too busy to take calls or greet drop-ins. Sometimes I was so busy I could only do interviews while eating lunch or I would have to skip a meal. (So make certain your table manner are impeccable.)

I think dropping off your resume to the front desk is a good idea. It means you are serious about wanting the job. If you had dropped off your resume at my receptionist's desk, I would have asked the front gals how you looked, if you spoke professionally, etc.

Not about resumes but important -

If you are lucky and get an interview, ALWAYS send a handwritten thank you note afterward. If I didnt' get one, I assumed the gal didn't want the job. Yes, even for filing clerks. This is also your second chance to mention something you wished you had said at the interview - like special training or experience specific to what they need.

Good luck!
 

Pursegrrl

Oh no she di-int!!
O.G.
Jun 1, 2006
28,070
72
53
Seattle
What Redney said!! Good luck to you, Crystalina...please PM me if you need to chat. I am full time job hunting myself!

XXXOO PG
 

TygerKitty

~*~ addicted ~*~
O.G.
Feb 26, 2008
16,850
4
Colorado
Hmmm... I don't know what it's like where you are but I have spent my entire summer applying for teaching jobs. They STRICTLY say they do NOT want any paperwork in person unless it requests specific things sent (usually to a district office; not a school). They are becoming more and more online these days and if that's where their application was, I doubt they want extra papers to shuffle around. But, that's just where I live.

You could call to check on the status of your application but that would be all I recommend. Additionally, anyone you would see to turn in paperwork with would probably work in HR, not a hiring committee for a teaching position; the hiring staff usually only gets together one or two days to interview candidates so the chances of you getting to speak with someone that would be hiring are slim to none.

Good luck though!!!!!!!!!! I really hope you find something!