Equestrians...boot advice. *PICS*

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  1. Ok so I got these boots in mid September. It's October and I just noticed today that the leather on the calf of my right boot is looking surprisingly worn for having had them for such a short amount of time. AND they're Parlanti's - so to me there's no real excuse for $1k+ boots with glowing reviews from everyone who has them to be showing the wear that they are. Am I just overreacting? I do ride 5 times a week so they're definitely being put through their paces...but still. What do you all think? These are my first pair of "nice" boots and I take really good care of them (regular polishing, WD40 on the zippers, cedar boot trees, etc)

    Boots
    [​IMG]
    parlantis by eurasiangirl2012, on Flickr

    Worn part
    [​IMG]
    rubs by eurasiangirl2012, on Flickr
     
  2. I would think something about your riding form is causing one sided wear.
     
  3. That's what I thought at first as well....and it could very well be...though the other side shows some wear too, just not the extent of which the right one does.
     
  4. It's def your form. If your were balanced the wear would be even. Are you moving your legs quite a bit while posting? The rubbed appearance is normal with the amount of riding you do. That's why so many people save their nice boots for showing only. I stick with paddock boots for everyday since I do stalls before I ride.


    Just keep caring for the leather and they should last for years.
     
  5. My boots have similar wear...I've had them since last December, and was riding about 5 days a week up until last month. You might want to get yourself some less expensive everyday boots, and save these for shows...

    One other thought, it may not be your form, it could also be your horse. My mare is stiff going to the left, so I use that leg A LOT more than the other, and my boots do reflect that.