Early, a bit late, or exactly on time for an invitation?

When do you prefer your guests to arrive?

  • before the time

  • exactly on time

  • a little bit later

  • no opinion


Results are only viewable after voting.

Traminer

Member
Dec 28, 2014
1,916
1,607
Early, a bit late, or exactly on time for an invitation?




What do you prefer?


For me it is OK when the guest arrive bit later - say, 15 minutes later.


Exactly on time is tolerated - but to arrive before the time I find horrible.
 

Lejic

Member
Jul 5, 2015
640
1,810
"Exactly on time is tolerated."

This is my problem with 99% of the invitations I get. If you have a dinner party "at 8" that's when I want to show up! If you want me at 8:15 or 8:30 why not just say so?

To be fair, in real life most guests don't seem to mind like you do if I'm on time or only 5 minutes past, but nobody else ever shows up until like an hour later so I've given up. Why can't people just share the *actual* time they want? I don't understand what anybody gets from this "say an hour earlier than you mean" exercise.
 

tulipfield

O.G.
Dec 11, 2007
1,302
1,294
Depends on the event. If it's a dinner, exactly on time is better otherwise the food that I've prepared for that time will get cold and we also won't be able to start eating together. Otherwise coming a bit late is fine.
 

tulipfield

O.G.
Dec 11, 2007
1,302
1,294
What do you mean by "dinner"?


You make it sound like a very important and official function.


I am speaking if private and informal invitations.


Maybe only for a coffee and a cake.


Invitations from a private person, not from some very importantant organization.


Like a sit-down dinner. Even if it's informal, my food's going to get cold if it sits around too long.
 
Jun 7, 2012
388
1,269
Omg do I have an input for this!!!

I am of an asian background and I'm not generalising all Asians when I say this so maybe just my family: when I invite family over, say for lunch, they would arrive at 2 or 3. Or even if they know a party is to begin at 6pm they would still arrive an hour or two later. Gets on my nerves!!!! Good thing my friends and I don't do this to one another.
 

Docjeun

Member
Sep 15, 2012
2,009
644
Omg do I have an input for this!!!

I am of an asian background and I'm not generalising all Asians when I say this so maybe just my family: when I invite family over, say for lunch, they would arrive at 2 or 3. Or even if they know a party is to begin at 6pm they would still arrive an hour or two later. Gets on my nerves!!!! Good thing my friends and I don't do this to one another.

Tell them to come two hours earlier!

I hate, hate, hate it when People arrive early and my family are big at this, 1/2 hour early is what it usually is!
I want people to arrive on time.
 

Minty Tea

Member
Jun 14, 2015
668
388
On time would be best give or take 10 min. If you arrive early (15 min before) expect to help set the table or help the hostess. Arriving late is just inconsiderate to everyone there unless it's a legitimate reason and you call ahead to let them know. Don't expect anyone to wait for you.

Things happen (traffic, baby spit up on you as you walk out the house, etc.), as long as it's not a consistent thing then it's fine. Some people are habitually late, not cool.
 
Last edited:
Mar 14, 2006
5,493
864
So far there has been only one vote in the poll.


Why are you so shy to give your vote?


Voting is anonymous - so: No fear!

Because the poll isn't very specific so it's hard to answer (and because of the time of day you posted it). My answer depends entirely on the event.

Dinner party at someone's house: a little bit later but not much.
Cocktail party at someone's house: a little bit later.
Coffee at someone's house: a little later.

A wedding: exactly on time.
A baptism: exactly on time.
Dinner at a restaurant: exactly on time.
 

remainsilly

bye-bye
Aug 15, 2014
6,470
9,581
For informal get together, don't mind guests a little early.
Truth told, I usually arrive to appointments early, then wait. Habit.
Would rather friends wait in warm home, helping me do prep work. ;)

Or, on time. Or few minutes late.
Understood.

Certain friends arrived 1 HOUR LATE, twice in row, for sit down dinner plans.
So refused to invite again for this.
Too much problem for me.

Also host arrived 45 minutes late, for own holiday party, this year.
As we sat in cold vehicles, phoning to ask whereabouts.
Not awesome behavior. Covered with excuses of, "being busy."
Common to see, now. Sadly.

Have been asked to, "Call & remind me," of set plans/times/etc.
Which I refuse to do. As I keep track of my own appointments.
Buy a pocket agenda. Or learn how to use your mobile phone calendar. :P
 

Traminer

Member
Dec 28, 2014
1,916
1,607
I thought being EXACTLY on time - or even 5 minutes early - was one of those "Prussian virtues" that nobody liked.


Now I am surprised to see that those "Prussian virtues" are also quite popular elsewhere.


*smile*
 

Traminer

Member
Dec 28, 2014
1,916
1,607
Also host arrived 45 minutes late, for own holiday party, this year.
As we sat in cold vehicles, phoning to ask whereabouts.
Not awesome behavior. Covered with excuses of, "being busy."
Common to see, now. Sadly.

For a host to arrive late is an absolute no-go, of course!


I cannot hardly think of any excuse for such behaviour than premature death .... or a simular serious reason ....
 
Aug 18, 2008
10,225
676
Assuming this is for events I'm hosting - half my family arrives half an hour-to-an hour early, and the other half is at least 2 hours late.

I don't like when they're so early that I'm still prepping and cooking because I'm afraid the distraction will cause an accident or I'll forget something. Half an hour early is fine IMO.

I just tell the perpetually late (it's a joke in our family that they are on TST - "their" standard time) to be there 2 hours before the start time. They still manage to be super late, ugh.
 
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