Dogs fighting

EllaL

Member
May 7, 2010
33
0
A friend of mine has four dauchunds (sp?). A mother and three adult pups (2 femals and a blind male).

They have occasional fights but today when I went over I had to pull the two females apart. We both understand about the alpha dog and all that. But this goes a little farther.

The one (who is usually the most dominant) had a hurt back leg so we brought her in for the afternoon. She just layed around and limped on her back leg (mild superficial bleeding at first). When we let the other dogs in for a while she acted terrified. They usually stay in a large fenced back yard and sleep in a dog house, together.

The past two nights they have got to sleep inside because it has been unusually cold. (They are house trained and typically well behaved.) All day today the one that was attacked has been scared of the mother and the sister, but not the male. She will follow you through the house and stay at your feet.

When it came time for bed she started crying to be in the bed instead of sleeping with the other dogs.

So, I'm posting looking for some help for her (my friend and the dog...haha) Is it safe for her to put the dog in the back yard with the others while she is at work? Is there a 'natural' reason the dog is acting this way, or is she just being overly dramatic (which she is known for!)?

Anyone ever experienced something like this?
 

LisaG719

Living life...
O.G.
Jun 16, 2006
7,358
66
Oregon
I personally don't feel it is ever a good idea to leave multiple dogs unattended for such a long period of time.
 

boxermomof2

Member
Jul 21, 2009
5,205
37
I don't know from personal experience, but I do know rescue groups generally do not place two females together. It is my understanding that once they get into a fight, they will always fight.

I would not leave the dogs unattended in a backyard. I never leave my dogs outside unsupervised. I believe crating is the safest solution.
 

lisarx8

O.G.
Aug 16, 2009
257
3
NTSC-U
Your going to have to crate, separate, and rotate the dogs until they can get along. Which may be never. Are they all altered(spayed and neutered)? If not, that may help the dominance issues. However, due to their age, dominance could now be a learned behavior and altering will not help.

I also agree with the above post. Two males generally get along better than two females.
 

Irishgal

I run with scissors
O.G.
Apr 22, 2006
15,382
2,789
Long and Low Farms
Your going to have to crate, separate, and rotate the dogs until they can get along. Which may be never. Are they all altered(spayed and neutered)? If not, that may help the dominance issues. However, due to their age, dominance could now be a learned behavior and altering will not help.

I also agree with the above post. Two males generally get along better than two females.
And if the dog owners are not willing or able to do this, don't have time, whatever I would consider seeing if they can find a good home for the female that got hurt, or maybe even dachshund rescue. Once this starts they may not get along.
 

coco5

Member
Oct 13, 2010
825
0
SF
I don't know from personal experience, but I do know rescue groups generally do not place two females together. It is my understanding that once they get into a fight, they will always fight.

I would not leave the dogs unattended in a backyard. I never leave my dogs outside unsupervised. I believe crating is the safest solution.
exactly. When males fight the problem can sometimes be resolved. When females fight.... usually they will never stop. Im part of a forum on dogs. There has been a couple of people who had that problem and they had to separate the dogs forever. Most of them tried leaving them together but after the two females nearly killing each other they had to do it.
im not saying this is what will happen to your friends dogs. But maybe a good idea would be to contact a dog educateur ( i have no idea how you say this in english) who could help to find a way to have these dogs live together without more fights. How old are the females?
The dogs should not be left together without surveillance.