Dior Pre-Fall 2013

averagejoe

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Introducing Dior's Pre-Fall 2013 collection from Raf Simons. These are only some of the looks. More will come after the Haute Couture collection at the end of January.

Here's a description from WWD:

For his first pre-fall collection for Dior, Raf Simons wrote another chapter in his modernist makeover of the storied French house, employing the same vocabulary as his couture and ready-to-wear debuts last year.

“New classics” is the term the Belgian designer applied to his latest takes on tuxedo suits, “bar” jackets and such iconic prints and fabrics as florals and Prince de Galle checks. “I wanted to continue exploring the Dior codes we started establishing,” Simons told WWD.

But this being his first collection for Dior not destined for a runway, he strove to accentuate the brand’s sophistication with a dose of reality, headlined by more relaxed fits “for a lot of different body types,” he said.

Cue the luxury denim — a Japanese fabric dyed that inimitable Dior gray. While stovepipe-thin jeans gave a young, hip verve to sculpted coats and Simons’ abbreviated ballgown tops, the house’s new denim comes in five different fits.

Coats and dresses also curved forgivingly around hips while still defining the waist, which Simons deems a key Dior signature. One cozy coatdress was worked with the toggle buttons and nonchalance of a duffle coat.

For cocktail and evening, the designer refined and elaborated on some of the ideas from his spring rtw debut: Many short dresses in silk gazar sprouted a swag of fabric on one side for an asymmetric effect, while dramatic floor-length skirts in featherweight taffeta were topped with snug or elongated knits.

Simons brought some couture details and techniques to the collection, albeit, he said, “also in a realistic way.” For example, he married gauzy cable knits to tulle, making them light and transparent but able to take on different volumes.

Newsy, too, were his takes on men’s wear fabrics, etching houndstooth patterns with crystal embroideries across a brief jacket, or obscuring herringbone and check patterns with unusual scales and combinations, even at times showing the reverse side.

Despite the flurry of design responsibilities he’s juggling — he shows his signature men’s wear lineup on Jan. 16, five days before Dior couture — Simons said he’s serene about his step-by-step strategy at the French house. “I want to approach this whole story very slowly. I’m very patient about it,” he said, stressing that the shapes and allure founder Christian Dior pioneered remain “feminine, universal and natural."
[Source: http://www.wwd.com/runway/pre-fall-2013/review/christian-dior]
 

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itaque

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Apr 5, 2009
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Thank you Averagejoe, you always have beautiful pictures for us. :smile:

I love the second and the last pictures. And I love to see the "atelier" behind.
 
Sep 19, 2010
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Berkeley
I'm sorry; they are absolutely lovely, but I really can't see "Dior" in them for some reason. I guess I am just so used to John Galliano's designs...Whenever I saw his collections, I knew right away they belonged to the House of Dior without reading the title. Now I don't agree with his controversial statements and I do agree that he should have been fired, but still, I miss him every time I see a new collection from Dior. Oh John, why did you shoot yourself??!!
 

averagejoe

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Thank you Averagejoe, you always have beautiful pictures for us. :smile:

I love the second and the last pictures. And I love to see the "atelier" behind.
You're very welcome! I thank WWD for allowing free access to this article. Most of their articles cannot be read without a subscription.

And I love the atelier in the background as well. It makes a very nice setting for these pictures.
 

averagejoe

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I'm sorry; they are absolutely lovely, but I really can't see "Dior" in them for some reason. I guess I am just so used to John Galliano's designs...Whenever I saw his collections, I knew right away they belonged to the House of Dior without reading the title. Now I don't agree with his controversial statements and I do agree that he should have been fired, but still, I miss him every time I see a new collection from Dior. Oh John, why did you shoot yourself??!!
I miss Galliano's designs, too. Things like the Samourai bag and the out-of-this-world ball gowns will no longer be part of Dior.

However, I think that Dior needed a breath of fresh air as well. Galliano's opulent, extravagant, and almost over-the-top vision was very much needed and relevant during the 90s, but it is not as relevant today. With the exception of the two seasons when Galliano's inner-wear-as-outer-wear trend hit the world stage in Fall 2009 and Spring 2010, Galliano's collections have not been able to set the fashion agenda. Meanwhile, designers like Phoebe Philo and Nicolas Ghesquiere have been able to claim the fashion agenda season after season.

With every collection, he was able to make the nicest dresses that anyone can buy, but they defined Dior as simply a label rather than a true fashion icon.

Under Simon's direction, Dior certainly gains a strong iconic look with a clearly emphasized narrowed waist and architectural proportions. These were the silhouettes of Monsieur Dior himself, but done in such modern ways that they are very relevant to today's times.

When I see a Dior design by Galliano, I see a lot of Galliano rather than Dior. The romantic chiffon and bias-cut dresses were his signatures, but these looks were prominent in his collections for Dior and his own label. As a result, he didn't really define a Dior look.
 

eminere™

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I'd like to see the rest of the collection. As is, there is very little newness being offered. Though I'm sure people will be excited at the prospect of buying an haute couture silhouette and style at ready-to-wear prices.
 
Sep 19, 2010
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Yeah, lol, I adore looking at Dior clothes (though I must say I never buy them--they are out of my price range!) I just buy their shoes, makeup, and the occasional bag so I do believe you know much more about the fashion world and Dior than I do. I do like these new pieces--I like that they are classy and wearable. Haute couture that can be worn by a non-model? That is certainly innovative, at least to me! It's a distinct change from Galliano and Dior does seem to be going in a new direction. Every design house does need to evolve; after all, fashion always changes.

But I guess as someone who doesn't buy high end clothes, I just loved looking at Galliano's theatrical and flamboyant designs. I just remember waiting for his new collections and being blown away by how other-worldly and art-like his work was, while still hinting at being Dior without obvious labels. They were the first time I actually looked at clothes as being art, and not just someone's style. I just love unusual, flamboyant, romantic things, which is why I miss Galliano so much.

I don't dislike Simons though. One of my life goals is to get a Dior suit, and am saving up/looking forward to what Simons will do.


I miss Galliano's designs, too. Things like the Samourai bag and the out-of-this-world ball gowns will no longer be part of Dior.

However, I think that Dior needed a breath of fresh air as well. Galliano's opulent, extravagant, and almost over-the-top vision was very much needed and relevant during the 90s, but it is not as relevant today. With the exception of the two seasons when Galliano's inner-wear-as-outer-wear trend hit the world stage in Fall 2009 and Spring 2010, Galliano's collections have not been able to set the fashion agenda. Meanwhile, designers like Phoebe Philo and Nicolas Ghesquiere have been able to claim the fashion agenda season after season.

With every collection, he was able to make the nicest dresses that anyone can buy, but they defined Dior as simply a label rather than a true fashion icon.

Under Simon's direction, Dior certainly gains a strong iconic look with a clearly emphasized narrowed waist and architectural proportions. These were the silhouettes of Monsieur Dior himself, but done in such modern ways that they are very relevant to today's times.

When I see a Dior design by Galliano, I see a lot of Galliano rather than Dior. The romantic chiffon and bias-cut dresses were his signatures, but these looks were prominent in his collections for Dior and his own label. As a result, he didn't really define a Dior look.
 

papertiger

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I loved Galliano too, he did wonders for the House and he was perfect for the times (and yes I do have a strapless denim dress from those days :love:).

These silhouettes, colours and cuts would suit me. Sorry, for being so selfish but sometimes a little old-fashioned wear-ability is not a bad thing, esp when it also looks so fresh.
 

bobobob

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