Difference in croc treatments

foxie-pooh

O.G.
Jan 29, 2006
1,220
256
What is exactly the difference between all the different croc treatments from Bottega? I'm in the market for a croc wallet, but I can't decide if I should go for something in cocco lave or crocodile fume...or even the new tie-dye! Any suggestions? I'd love to hear about how the crocs will age as a wallet (bifold) as well, if anyone can share their experience. For durability in exotics, should I stay with my reptile or go for a birdie?
 

jburgh

BV ~ Ferragamo ~ TODs
Moderator
Authenticator
O.G.
Aug 17, 2007
15,197
651
In the Forest
foxie - Alligator and croc is durable, but if you are in very high humidity or get it wet the scales can blister. This is the biggest drawback for me. I have a gorg Ferragamo alligator bag, that does not get used as much as it should. I'm assuming you are a male and would be pulling a bifold out of your pocket or messenger bag, and maybe getting some rain exposure. But if you do not have to worry about rain or constant high humidity - go for croc/alligator. They are so beautiful.

As for finishing, I can give you a little info, but a BV SA can probably get some more info. The best croc finishes are made by rubbing with agate to polish into a high shine. You may have heard this before...that they are finished with a stone. Scales are made of keratin and like your fingernails, buffing will shine them up. Then there is glazing. Glazing is a coating to protect and keep your croc shiny. Some manufacturers skip the agate polishing (bad/cheepo) and glaze only. Matte croc is finished gently or sometimes sanded to uniformity.

Fume (fumed/smoked), Lave (washed), Tie-dye (self explanatory) are just treatments to alter the look from a natural scale appearance.

Fumed skins are exposed to fumes, which gives the scales a darker appearance around the edges of the scales. I doubt it is actually smoked with wood smoke, but I do not know what chemical is used to fume croc. Or it could even be dyed to look like something that was fumed.

Lave - I have no idea how this is done.

Ostrich is very durable, too. I have an Ostrich Kelly that has been rained on and it never spotted or changed.
 

Ranag

Light Years Away
Jan 4, 2006
5,405
73
When I bought my croc tie dye wallet, the SA was explaining to me that they use some sort of rollers in the process to get the tie dye effect. I have to admit, I was not paying attention as well as I should have because I was completely mesmerized by the beauty of it :P
 

foxie-pooh

O.G.
Jan 29, 2006
1,220
256
Thanks for your explanations! Very interesting processes...I would love a limo cocco lave but I guess a light colored croc would be a disaster with denim...right?
 

Flip88

Member
Jan 16, 2010
5,569
2,218
foxie - Alligator and croc is durable, but if you are in very high humidity or get it wet the scales can blister. This is the biggest drawback for me. I have a gorg Ferragamo alligator bag, that does not get used as much as it should. I'm assuming you are a male and would be pulling a bifold out of your pocket or messenger bag, and maybe getting some rain exposure. But if you do not have to worry about rain or constant high humidity - go for croc/alligator. They are so beautiful.

As for finishing, I can give you a little info, but a BV SA can probably get some more info. The best croc finishes are made by rubbing with agate to polish into a high shine. You may have heard this before...that they are finished with a stone. Scales are made of keratin and like your fingernails, buffing will shine them up. Then there is glazing. Glazing is a coating to protect and keep your croc shiny. Some manufacturers skip the agate polishing (bad/cheepo) and glaze only. Matte croc is finished gently or sometimes sanded to uniformity.

Fume (fumed/smoked), Lave (washed), Tie-dye (self explanatory) are just treatments to alter the look from a natural scale appearance.

Fumed skins are exposed to fumes, which gives the scales a darker appearance around the edges of the scales. I doubt it is actually smoked with wood smoke, but I do not know what chemical is used to fume croc. Or it could even be dyed to look like something that was fumed.

Lave - I have no idea how this is done.

Ostrich is very durable, too. I have an Ostrich Kelly that has been rained on and it never spotted or changed.

Thanks for a very informative post.