Blind and deaf pug

bisousx

O.G.
Jan 3, 2008
12,341
10,328
out of my suitcase
I adopted a senior pug during the lockdowns in 2020, and at the time he was already deaf and partially blind.

In the past couple days, it’s become apparent that he may be fully blind.
He has been looking very lost around the house, standing around instead of exploring the house and doing his usual routine. He came to us well trained, could scratch on the door to notify us it was potty time. Recently he seems scared to walk and find his way around.

He still has a healthy appetite and can find his way to our couch to hang out at our feet, so I’m hoping he will adjust and won’t be sad or afraid of his newfound darkness.

I’ve tried researching this but haven’t found any tips on how to help blind & deaf dogs find a routine and pathway to the backyard to do his business.


Can anyone help?

320DD392-A982-4A65-AFAE-9A975CFD483A.jpeg
 

jennlt

Hounds and Handbags
O.G.
Sep 17, 2009
1,280
4,430
I adopted a senior pug during the lockdowns in 2020, and at the time he was already deaf and partially blind.

In the past couple days, it’s become apparent that he may be fully blind.
He has been looking very lost around the house, standing around instead of exploring the house and doing his usual routine. He came to us well trained, could scratch on the door to notify us it was potty time. Recently he seems scared to walk and find his way around.

He still has a healthy appetite and can find his way to our couch to hang out at our feet, so I’m hoping he will adjust and won’t be sad or afraid of his newfound darkness.

I’ve tried researching this but haven’t found any tips on how to help blind & deaf dogs find a routine and pathway to the backyard to do his business.


Can anyone help?

View attachment 5219976
How wonderful of you to adopt a senior dog! My first dog as an adult was also a senior dog and our time together was too short.
Since dogs have such incredible senses of smell, maybe you could try to line the floor to the back door with some treats? After a few days of this, he may get the hang of it. I'm sure he will feel much more comfortable if you go outside with him and stay within a few feet of him while he does his business. My 14-year old dog doesn't like us to be out of sight and his vision has declined with age. He finds our proximity very reassuring.
I lost a dog a few years ago who was almost blind but he had lived in our house for several years so he was more familiar with his pathways. I still carried him almost everywhere because I didn't want to chance him getting injured. I was lucky that he only weighed 12 pounds, though, so it was easy for me to do.
Keep us updated on your progress and best of luck!
 

bisousx

O.G.
Jan 3, 2008
12,341
10,328
out of my suitcase
How wonderful of you to adopt a senior dog! My first dog as an adult was also a senior dog and our time together was too short.
Since dogs have such incredible senses of smell, maybe you could try to line the floor to the back door with some treats? After a few days of this, he may get the hang of it. I'm sure he will feel much more comfortable if you go outside with him and stay within a few feet of him while he does his business. My 14-year old dog doesn't like us to be out of sight and his vision has declined with age. He finds our proximity very reassuring.
I lost a dog a few years ago who was almost blind but he had lived in our house for several years so he was more familiar with his pathways. I still carried him almost everywhere because I didn't want to chance him getting injured. I was lucky that he only weighed 12 pounds, though, so it was easy for me to do.
Keep us updated on your progress and best of luck!
Thank you for the suggestion!

There was some progress today - my lil guy walked himself slowly out to the backyard after I spent the morning leading him out (touching him as he was walking so he felt comfortable).

and we’ve been putting in pizza/chicken into his kibble to entice him to eat, so at least he knows how to find his bowl.
 

jennlt

Hounds and Handbags
O.G.
Sep 17, 2009
1,280
4,430
Thank you for the suggestion!

There was some progress today - my lil guy walked himself slowly out to the backyard after I spent the morning leading him out (touching him as he was walking so he felt comfortable).

and we’ve been putting in pizza/chicken into his kibble to entice him to eat, so at least he knows how to find his bowl.
Wow, you've made great progress. Trial and error and treats is the way to go. Since dogs have their own individual personalities just like people, all you can do is keep trying until you find something that works for both of you and it sounds like you are well on your way.
Best wishes for continued success with your sweet boy!
 
  • Like
  • Love
Reactions: sand and bisousx

luvprada

O.G.
Nov 23, 2008
21,409
2,057
You are an true angel for giving him a forever home. You can buy mini training treats to leave a trail to the door. Patience, time and love are everything.
 
  • Love
  • Like
Reactions: sand and bisousx

bisousx

O.G.
Jan 3, 2008
12,341
10,328
out of my suitcase
You are an true angel for giving him a forever home. You can buy mini training treats to leave a trail to the door. Patience, time and love are everything.
I feel lucky to have him .. he was love at first sight for me!

I wonder at what point can one determine the quality of life for a dog that can’t see or hear anymore. I worry about his happiness :sad:
 
Last edited:
  • Like
Reactions: sand and luvprada

IntheOcean

Authenticator
Apr 4, 2018
3,948
4,509
Cannot give any advice, sorry. But I just wanted to say thank you for taking him in and providing such good care for him. :heart: I hope he will adjust, and it's a good thing you have other dogs to keep him company, I think that would help him. Just because he's blind and deaf, doesn't mean he's not capable of enjoying his life. Dogs are pretty good at adjusting to circumstances.
 

880

30th anniversary cuff
O.G.
Aug 31, 2008
10,130
23,538
Sending you and your sweet dog hugs! I hope he adjusts soon!
 
  • Love
Reactions: bisousx
Jan 15, 2011
9,101
20,930
I feel lucky to have him .. he was love at first sight for me!

I wonder at what point can one determine the quality of life for a dog that can’t see or hear anymore. I worry about his happiness :sad:
I have a deaf dog (he suffered a concussion maybe 5 months ago and lost his hearing, although he is also a senior dog) and although he is not blind, he has vision issues and his depth perception is even worse than a normal dog's depth perception.
Dogs are fortunate in that their sense of smell can make up for a lot, as you are probably learning. As your guy gets confident, he will start to learn his paths around the whole house. You're doing all the right things, I think.

I learned a lot from a book about owning a deaf dog - there are probably resources for dogs who are also blind as well :heart:

You will know your dog's happiness from his affection, his eating, his physicality - there's really no reason he can't live out as many more years as he has. I believe a deaf and blind dog can be very happy. My deaf guy only gets bummed out (he is still adjusting) when he can't get up onto something that once was easy (like our couch). I can see his bewilderment and lowered tail, but I also think he is slowly working around it.

You've given a home to a dog who richly deserves it, bless you!
 

bisousx

O.G.
Jan 3, 2008
12,341
10,328
out of my suitcase
Thanks everyone for the kind words, I feel a little better and will have to try the treat method if needed.

My husband reported that last night, my dog slowly walked himself to the backyard and back to his bed at 4am (his usual early morning trip) so that is good progress!

We bought a bunch of night lights and one of those teddy bear lamps in case he’s not 100% blind, he can find his water bowl at night.
 

smallfry

My Sweet Angel
O.G.
Dec 18, 2005
7,645
3,352
USA
Thank you for the suggestion!

There was some progress today - my lil guy walked himself slowly out to the backyard after I spent the morning leading him out (touching him as he was walking so he felt comfortable).

and we’ve been putting in pizza/chicken into his kibble to entice him to eat, so at least he knows how to find his bowl.
Progress already, that's wonderful! Dogs adapt really well to things that we humans have a much harder time adapting to, like the loss of a limb, hearing, or vision. I've read about blind dogs who "map" their surroundings, so they always seem to know their way.

There are also halo-type products that a blind dog can wear on their head or attached to their harness which prevents them from bumping into furniture, etc.

And, you might find that your other dog will become your blind dog's "guide dog", sensing that he needs the help :heart:
 
  • Like
Reactions: bisousx

this_is_rj

O.G.
Mar 1, 2011
512
626
Our vet suggested tying pipe cleaners or zip ties to their collar so that they can judge their distance from items. It is likely your pup can feel his way around the house by using something like this.
 
  • Insightful
  • Like
Reactions: jennlt and bisousx