Workplace Asking for a payrise

oggers86

Member
Dec 7, 2008
3,572
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Leicestershire
So I have been in my job a bit over a year and am currently the longest standing food and beverage supervisor they have left. The original team when I started a year ago have all left as have a few others..

So as a Food and Beverage Supervisor I am responsible for the entire department which means taking care of restaurant and bar (sometimes functions) simultaneously. I have to ensure staff are working to the correct standards and are just generally doing their job, plus interacting with our guests and dealing with any issues which may arise. Its my decision when the staff go for breaks and when they can leave (if they dont have a finish time) If they are late it is my responsibility to chase them up. After shift I have to cash up all the tills and fix them if they dont balance. This may mean taking money off the staff on shift that day..

I accepted the job as hourly paid and took a slight dip due to it being a better job with more responsibility and I was looking to move to the area.

Recently I was offered a "payrise" Basically I was taken off hourly and put onto salary so whilst my "official" salary has gone up, my take home pay hasnt due to the fact I dont get paid overtime.

I have also taken on "Duty Manager" shifts where I am responsible for the whole hotel. We have an early Duty Manager and a Late one. The early shift is easier as there is usually someone there to handle issues such as a water leak or an electric fault. Lates however are different as you are literally the most senior person in the building quite often. Therefore you have to change a light bulb, fix a water leak, decide if a guest needs to change rooms, make beds, deal with complaints, oversee the rest of the front of house departments. It will ultimately be your decision if the bar needs closing or if you need to ring an ambulance for someone or take charge if the fire alarm goes off. Plus you also have to stay over for the night when you are basically "on call"

This responsibility does not actually come with extra pay which is slightly frustrating. However, the most frustrating thing is that lately because we have no fully fledged supervisors, I am often doing a supervisor job at the same time as a duty manager job. This can be increasingly difficult when you have a busy department but you get called away to deal with a fault elsewhere.

Plus, due to me being the most senior supervisor, I have also had to train the 3 new supervisors (this can be hard if I am Duty Manager at the same time) Unfortunately one of the new supervisors has just left, leaving what should be a team of 6 down to a team of 3 with 2 of the team having less than 4 months of experience in the hotel.

So basically I am debating asking for a payrise, I am currently on £14800, the assistant F&B gets £18000 so I was thinking of asking for £16000. Its a bit of a jump from my current salary but I kind of feel its sensible as it reflects my hard work and willingness to do the job wherever necessary.

Plus at the minute I am doing a long term course in which I have to do coursework which is adding to my workload and I am really feeling the pressure at the minute.

If you were my manager would you listen to the above with respect and be willing to consider a payrise without it looking like I am asking too much or just being greedy?
 
Oct 20, 2008
4,172
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manhattan
first, you should write down the reason why you should get a raise - not in long paragraphs as you did here but in bulleted list. emphasize all the new duties and responsibilities you have taken on, etc. if possible, include cost savings or revenue generating ideas you've come up with or implemented. also include any excellent performance reviews, feedback from customers, etc... basically show that you've been great for the company's bottom line. when you meet with your manager, hand her that typed list (have your own copy) and go over it with her.

oh, why are you asking for less than what the assistant f&b (is she your assistant?). they often give less than you ask, they rarely give more. ask for exactly what you want - not what you think they will give you. they can decide what they can afford.

good luck. oh, I posted a threat with a new york times article on how to ask for a raise a couple of weeks ago.
 

oggers86

Member
Dec 7, 2008
3,572
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Leicestershire
first, you should write down the reason why you should get a raise - not in long paragraphs as you did here but in bulleted list. emphasize all the new duties and responsibilities you have taken on, etc. if possible, include cost savings or revenue generating ideas you've come up with or implemented. also include any excellent performance reviews, feedback from customers, etc... basically show that you've been great for the company's bottom line. when you meet with your manager, hand her that typed list (have your own copy) and go over it with her.

oh, why are you asking for less than what the assistant f&b (is she your assistant?). they often give less than you ask, they rarely give more. ask for exactly what you want - not what you think they will give you. they can decide what they can afford.

good luck. oh, I posted a threat with a new york times article on how to ask for a raise a couple of weeks ago.

Thanks for the reply...

I have just started trying to save the company money on teaspoons, coming up with a new system of storing them so they dont keep getting lost.

Plus pushing the team to get out and upsell...

I am the supervisor, the f and b assistant managers are one step above hence why I am asking for a fair bit less.

If I can really push things over christmas when we are a supervisor down I think this may help. In January I can sit down with my typed list and see what happens.
 
Oct 20, 2008
4,172
1,318
manhattan
Thanks for the reply...

I have just started trying to save the company money on teaspoons, coming up with a new system of storing them so they dont keep getting lost.

Plus pushing the team to get out and upsell...

I am the supervisor, the f and b assistant managers are one step above hence why I am asking for a fair bit less.

If I can really push things over christmas when we are a supervisor down I think this may help. In January I can sit down with my typed list and see what happens.
i agree.

thanks for clarifying about the f & b assistant.
 

oggers86

Member
Dec 7, 2008
3,572
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Leicestershire
By the way, what should I do if they turn down my offer? Im not looking to leave the place and I dont think extra holidays is an option. Should I just say thanks and let it be? What happens then if in a year I ask again? Will they just not give it to me as I seemed fine not getting the first one?
 
Oct 20, 2008
4,172
1,318
manhattan
ask why. if it's anything about your work or something can change then ask what you should do to get a raise (write it down and make sure you do everything she said you should do for your next review). maybe broach the possibility of a promotion (i don't know anything about industry structure but some companies don't like giving people raises when they are at the top of the pay scale for that position but are willing to promote). in general you should be talking about career advancement with your manager anyway: where do you want to be in the short/long term and where does your manager see you. this not only shows him/her that you intend to stay but gives you an idea whether you have a future with your current company.

if there is no possibility of a raise or promotion, you should ask about reducing some of the responsibilities that was added on when some of your colleagues left. if not, you should learn to delegate some of your tasks - it's a useful skill to develop (although i shouldn't talk because i'm a total control freak when it comes to my work).
 

oggers86

Member
Dec 7, 2008
3,572
7
33
Leicestershire
ask why. if it's anything about your work or something can change then ask what you should do to get a raise (write it down and make sure you do everything she said you should do for your next review). maybe broach the possibility of a promotion (i don't know anything about industry structure but some companies don't like giving people raises when they are at the top of the pay scale for that position but are willing to promote). in general you should be talking about career advancement with your manager anyway: where do you want to be in the short/long term and where does your manager see you. this not only shows him/her that you intend to stay but gives you an idea whether you have a future with your current company.

if there is no possibility of a raise or promotion, you should ask about reducing some of the responsibilities that was added on when some of your colleagues left. if not, you should learn to delegate some of your tasks - it's a useful skill to develop (although i shouldn't talk because i'm a total control freak when it comes to my work).
Unless someone leaves no chance of promotion. In terms of delegating tasks I delegate as much as I can but thats just simple stuff. It is my job to do the cashing up and to oversee the business, plus we are also very short on Duty Managers because everybody left so I cant refuse to do those. Plus it is good experience for me.

Its kind of frustrating because I do feel I should earn more money and I will certainly give it a shot but all in all its good for the experience when I do move on. I dont know what it is I want to move onto but the skills I have learnt in this job will surely help me for the future, no matter what I decide to do.

On a day to day basis, from start to finish I:
1. Check staffing levels
2. Allocate tasks to staff
3. Check guest levels
4. Walk around to make sure everything is as it should be
5. Keep an eye on staff to ensure they are doing what they should be
6. Open the restaurant
7. Oversee running of restaurant and bar plus oversee member of staff setting up meeting rooms for next day
8. If staff levels are low, juggle them about where necessary
9. Allocate breaks
10. Cash up all tills, if they dont balance investigate (this can take a loong time)
11. Do all paperwork
12. Check meeting rooms
13. Decide if the staff can go home or if other tasks such as cleaning needs to be done.


Whilst Duty Manager I also have to be responsible for the entire hotel so whilst I may be overseeing the restaurant, I may get a call to say there is a suspicious bag, guest complaint, heating doesnt work, phone call about a meeting next week...plus having to walk around the entire hotel to check fire exits are clear, nothing shady lying around.

On a quiet day doing both jobs simultaneously is fine. When its busy and I have a busy restaurant and a busy bar its difficult.

Staff are already reluctant to take on the task of seating guests because they dont get paid for it and they dont see it as their job. Thankfully thats not my job to enforce, its the managers so if I need them on the door then they go on the door.

I can delegate my walk around as a Duty Manager, I can ask another person to send up some pillows or something simple like that. Its the running of the hotel and the dealing with complaints I cant delegate.
 
Oct 30, 2006
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If you were my manager would you listen to the above with respect and be willing to consider a payrise without it looking like I am asking too much or just being greedy?
You were doing great until you said this. You are not being greedy. You want a fair rate for all your increased workload. This is a typical attitude that women have...that you are greedy if you ask for more. Guys NEVER think this way. They think they DESERVE it. I think all your reasoning seems very logical and you need to NOT say anything about how stressed you are or how much pressure you feel or anything personal like that. You need to outline your accomplishments and be direct and ask.
 

athena21

Member
Aug 8, 2011
486
8
Totally, totally agree with allisonfaye! You are not being greedy AT ALL! You're only getting asked to be paid for the work you're doing!

Make sure you set aside time with your boss - let them pick the day/time that suits them best, so you can sit down together and explain your thoughts to them. With all the responsibility it sounds like they've thrust on you, you definitely deserve more than a slight increase onto salary.

On that note....think about what your high hope is - is it actually 16,000 that you're hoping for? Is there a lesser amount that you'd be happy with, but wouldn't feel like a slap in the face for sitting down to that conversation? I ALWAYS go with my high goal....obviously they're never going to offer you more than what you ask, and most times I end up regretting I didn't ask for more and negotiated down from there. I understand that assistant f&b is a step above you, but what are their job duties compared to yours?
 

whimsic

Member
Sep 1, 2011
2,596
193
Ok I don't know how you can do that without sounding greedy, but when you negotiate ask for more than what you want. So ask for a raise plus other benefits, such as a compensation for night shifts, shorter shifts, overtime after a certain number of hours, or more vacation days. Have plenty of justification, and work really hard so that your boss realizes that you are an asset.

Your boss would probably negotiate with you, and you could end up getting less than what you asked for. By asking for more, your boss may give you the raise without the benefits - and everybody's happy. Who knows, you may even get more than what you want.
 

Jennifer_C

Shopaholic
Feb 15, 2011
2,211
2
Massachusetts USA
Good luck, OP. Those conversations can be difficult but if you feel strongly about your position then it's definitely worth the effort to try :smile: My basic advice is to approach it as a "help me help you" situation and avoid any feeling of it being an ultimatum. Thank them for their offer but nicely convey that based upon your responsibilities you were thinking something more in the xxx range and would appreciate if they would consider that amount. You might want to ask for a little more than your bottom line in case they try to meet somewhere in the middle.

Unfortunately, a dip in overall pay is often common when folks get moved into salaried positions without overtime. Try to negotiate something that bridges the gap and also remember that the move up is probably still a good thing as it may lay the foundation for future promotions and salary increases that might not have been available as an hourly employee.

And lastly - I agree with the others not to look at it as being greedy! If you're worth the pay then there's nothing greedy about it; you're just taking care of yourself as you should be :hugs:
 

Laurie8504

chocolate...where?
O.G.
Sep 10, 2007
2,898
7
US
I think your time to ask was when you went from hourly to salaried pay. This may be something to discuss at a job performance review. I just don't think it is appropriate to ask for a raise shortly after receiving one.

However, it seems you were recently handed a lot of extra work (like the manager's tasks). What you can do, is speak up about this work, especially if it's not in your job description. I would set an appointment with my manager to discuss how adding on the duties of other managers has affected your quality of work, stress level, and overall performance. Ask if there is something that can be done to ensure a manager is always there to attend to their tasks so you don't have to. If that cannot be arranged, then depending on how the conversation is going you can inquire about a bonus or other compensation to justify the extra work you are putting in.

Additionally, look at other similar jobs in the area. How much are people in your position making at other hotels? This is great information to bring to your next review to ask for a raise, along with your list of "going above and beyond" tasks.
 

oggers86

Member
Dec 7, 2008
3,572
7
33
Leicestershire
The trouble is that a handful of others are also duty managers and dont get extra. Now we have new supervisors they will also be responsible for training new ones which we desperately need. In my personal opinion we all should recieve slightly extra on our duty managers but hey.

The other issue is that it belongs to a chain so there isnt much that can be done in terms of extra holidays..

I have looked at my job in other places and pay is similar but i dont know if they include duty manager shifts, i cant find pay info for duty manager.

Im starting to think asking for a payrise may not be fair as the only thing i have done others havent is train up a new supervisor team.

I hate the fact hospitality is so terribly paid but i dont think its a good idea to look at something else when there may be a wedding in 2013 and bf finishes his grad scheme that same year. If we stay in the area a few months more then maybe we can move elsewhere or maybe not but that would probably be the best time to change career.
 

Jennifer_C

Shopaholic
Feb 15, 2011
2,211
2
Massachusetts USA
I think your time to ask was when you went from hourly to salaried pay. This may be something to discuss at a job performance review. I just don't think it is appropriate to ask for a raise shortly after receiving one.
I'm sorry if I misunderstood, OP. If you already accepted it then I agree with Laurie that ideally this would have been the conversation to have before it was accepted. If you have a year-end review coming up you may have an opportunity to discuss it then. :hugs: