Afraid of accidental pregnancy

desperate

New Member
Nov 7, 2010
4
0
My 2 years old female dog was in heat and I was diagnosed with some disease recently (last week).
Was absorbed with my condition, did not keep her safe and he had her first sexual contact with her father yesterday.
During her all previous heats I was very careful and now I'm desperate.
Could not have her spayed as my other female dog I had her spayed developed some incontinence after surgery, which did not cure during the last three years and I'm afraid.
I keep either the male or the female in a separate place during the heats.
Now I'd be grateful for any answers to those questions.
1) I read that breeders who intend to bred their dogs do it so more than once in order to be sure they get pregnant, so is there any hope that my dog with only one contact will not get pregnant?
2) Is there any chance that the eventual pups will be healthy given that they are born from the father and his daughter?
Tks a lot in advance and plse forgive my english as it's not my mother tongue
 

NemoAndChula

Miss Alexandria Pup
Apr 30, 2010
2,814
2
66
Texas
Most spay surgeries go well without complications. It's not likely that having this female spayed will present any problems.
When a female dog gets pregnant, she can still be spayed. Especially when it's done soon after the contact. There should be no extra risk for your dog.
I don't know how likely it is that she got pregnant from one contact, but I assume it's a very good chance.

(The dog that we rescued last X-Mas was young and had just gone into her first heat. We had her spayed right away, and it turns out that she had been pregnant before we got her. She was fine and we were glad we had taken care of her as soon as we did.)

ETA, I hope that you will be alright as well.
 
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boxermomof2

Member
Jul 21, 2009
5,205
36
What about neutering the boy? Good luck...hope she's not pregnant and that she's okay.

True, but the female is more at risk of getting pregnant and pyometra. She needs to be spayed. She can die from pyometra.
If you are keeping her in tact for health reasons you can do a partial spay by leaving one ovary intact so she can continue to produce hormones. Males are not as much at risk as females.
I don't know for sure, but I think spaying a female while she is in heat is risky. My vet mentioned something to the effect but I'm not sure what the risks are exactly.

I wanted to add....OP, if you need more advice than your vet can give, join a breed specific forum and ask for help from experienced breeders. TPF is great but I think you will find more experienced breeders (reputable breeders) on a breed specific forum.
I belong to a RAW chat list with several reputable breeders that have extensive knowledge of breeding and raising litters. It is a Yahoo group called RAW-Lite. http://pets.groups.yahoo.com/group/RAW-lite/
The list discuss all health issues, it's not limited to RAW feeding.
 
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miss alice

Dogs Rule!!
O.G.
May 24, 2006
3,776
7
In the Shoes with Red Soles
please call your vet asap. it is possible she can be pregnant...please have her spayed..i agree with everything Boxermom said...please update us. and, i hope you feel better soon as well.
 

lizavet8

"Ruffian"
O.G.
May 3, 2007
1,231
70
Lonesome Dove
As stated above, we routinely spay animals in heat, and even pregnant animals, without complications. Pregnancy can be confirmed at 30 days via ultrasound, or 45 days via radiograph. It would be best to spay long before that, to minimize complications. She could get pregnent from a single mating, yes. There are no "mismating" shots nor drugs which are safe in dogs to terminate pregnancy. As to the health of the puppies, there is no way to predict that. A discussion with your veterinarian would be ideal.
 

boxermomof2

Member
Jul 21, 2009
5,205
36
As stated above, we routinely spay animals in heat, and even pregnant animals, without complications..
My vet told me there is risk of haemorrhage when spay surgery is performed during a heat cycle, and it is best to wait 2 weeks after the cycle ends. Of course we were discussing my female who has not been in contact with an intact male.

How much of a risk is there?
 

lizavet8

"Ruffian"
O.G.
May 3, 2007
1,231
70
Lonesome Dove
The increased risk has to do with an increase in blood supply to the uterus. This simply means more ligations. The inherent surgical risk is the same for a routine spay.
 

boxermomof2

Member
Jul 21, 2009
5,205
36
The increased risk has to do with an increase in blood supply to the uterus. This simply means more ligations. The inherent surgical risk is the same for a routine spay.
Are there any undesirable side effects to removing ovaries during a heat cycle? I've read the abrupt decline in hormones presents problems too.

One more question if you don't mind. A member on my boxer forum left her recently neutered male alone with his daughter who was in heat. The owner came home and found them tied. Several members of the forum recommended aborting any potential litter. Is spaying the only way to abort a litter? I'm very curious. The member never came back to the forum to tell us the outcome.
 
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lizavet8

"Ruffian"
O.G.
May 3, 2007
1,231
70
Lonesome Dove
Testosterone can persist for thirty days or so post neutering....so, yes, a potential litter could be a problem! Spaying is the only really "ethical" way to abort a litter. There are still a few old school veterinarians out there who will give high doses of hormones to dogs to "abort" a litter....this almost assures that a pyometra will happen, and/or a total disruption of the dog's estrus cycles for the rest of its life.

I don't know of any side effects to ovary removal during a heat cycle. I do lots of heat spays-it seems as though that's when people decide to spay! In the UK, ovaries are routinely left behind. This is an area of some debate in vet med-I guess my feeling is-if you can remove an organ safely that is a potential for cancer later in life (albeit a small one,) safely, why not do so? I have seen too many pyos and incidences of mammary cancer in unspayed older female dogs.
 

Miss Kris

Member
Jan 23, 2009
7,713
1
Maryland
I just wanted to address your father/daughter mating question. I don't believe that it would cause any serious issues, as I know of some breeders who mate like that. It's called "line breeding" and is done to keep certain traits within the "family" and to further develop specific traits. I'm not a vet but I've talked to many experienced breeders and that is what they have told me.
 

dallas

O.G.
Jan 17, 2007
6,087
9
I just wanted to address your father/daughter mating question. I don't believe that it would cause any serious issues, as I know of some breeders who mate like that. It's called "line breeding" and is done to keep certain traits within the "family" and to further develop specific traits. I'm not a vet but I've talked to many experienced breeders and that is what they have told me.
I believe in this case it is actually inbreeding.
 

boxermomof2

Member
Jul 21, 2009
5,205
36
In the UK, ovaries are routinely left behind. This is an area of some debate in vet med-I guess my feeling is-if you can remove an organ safely that is a potential for cancer later in life (albeit a small one,) safely, why not do so?
Honestly, I don't want to remove any organ unless it is 100% necessary. My breeder believes there are benefits to leaving one ovary behind. I understand it is not the best option for everyone.



Clip from Dr. Belfield :
I once performed this procedure on a ***** that was permitted to run loose,
needless to say all of the males were tearing down fences, fighting one
another to win the prize. This infuriated all human members in the
neighborhood, the owner insisted I remove the remaining ovary. These are
the ones I do not recommend for the procedure. As a rule, estrus alternates
between the two ovaries twice annually. The first animal I performed the
surgery on was my own German Shepherd, she had a wonderful long life. It
also has a tendency to minimize fat metabolism. The gonadotropic hormones
definitely play an important role in immune function. Most of the dogs with
allergies tend to be those that have been altered compared to whole animals.
I do agree, it does offer a more normal life for the female. I have also
performed vasectomies on males with the same positive results.
Wendell O. Belfield, DVM

http://www.belfield.com/pdfs/Partial_Spay.pdf


Can you point me to studies that will help me understand the pros and cons to partial spay? I'm not spaying my mastiff until she is 2 years old (per breeder contract), I would like to read more studies.
 
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