Toxic flowers for pets

  1. I just found this article online and thought of posting it here since so many PF members have pets.

    "Holidays, birthdays and even the occasional apology all have something in common – flowers. Cut flowers are a popular gift and are often found in the home. However, sometimes your pet may find the flowers very tempting and quite tasty. Listed below are 15 of the most popular cut flowers and their level of toxicity.


    Rose: Non-toxic

    Carnation: Mildly toxic. Chewing or ingesting the flowers can result in vomiting, diarrhea, drooling and lack of appetite.

    Eucalyptus: Though not a flower, eucalyptus is commonly used as decorative greenery. Mildly toxic. Chewing or ingesting the flowers can result in vomiting and diarrhea.

    Chrysanthemum: Mildly toxic. Chewing or ingesting the flowers can result in vomiting, diarrhea, drooling and lack of appetite.

    Tulip: Mildly toxic. Chewing or ingesting the flowers can result in vomiting, diarrhea, drooling and lack of appetite.

    Calla Lily: Mildly toxic. Chewing or ingesting the flowers can result in irritation of the mouth and throat, vomiting and drooling.

    Gladiola: Mildly toxic. Chewing or ingesting the flowers can result in vomiting, diarrhea, drooling and abdominal pain.



    Daisy: Mildly toxic. Chewing or ingesting the flowers can result in vomiting, diarrhea, drooling, staggering and lack of appetite.

    Lily: Severely toxic. Chewing or ingesting the flowers or any part of the plant can result in vomiting, lack of appetite and kidney failure in cats.

    Sunflower: Non-toxic.

    Iris: Mildly toxic. Chewing or ingesting the flowers can result in vomiting, diarrhea, drooling and abdominal pain.

    Baby's Breath: Mildly toxic. Chewing or ingesting the flowers can result in vomiting and diarrhea.

    Bird of Paradise: Mildly toxic. Chewing or ingesting the flower can result in vomiting, diarrhea or staggering.

    Daffodil: Moderately toxic. Chewing or ingesting the flower can result in vomiting, diarrhea, shivering or muscle tremors.

    Hydrangea: Moderate to severe toxicity. Chewing or ingesting the flower can result in vomiting, diarrhea, lack of appetite or collapse. Since hydrangea flowers contain cyanide, ingesting a large amount can be quite serious."
     
  2. Wow thank you for posting this information. Not that I ever have flowers at home:sad: but if I ever did, I would make sure to keep them somewhere away from my dogs.