Test Answers - funny!!!

  1. [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    :roflmfao::roflmfao::roflmfao: My fave one is the elephant!!! Hahaha!!!
     
  2. :roflmfao: :roflmfao: Those are hilarious!! I love the elephant one!! I am still laughing!
     
  3. OMG hahahaha!!!! :roflmfao::roflmfao::roflmfao::roflmfao: The elephant!!! :roflmfao:

    Got any more of those? :roflmfao: Oh man... I wish I'd have done that at least once in high school.... that's hilarious!!!
     
  4. haha i love them.. i lvoe the here it is... hahah classic
     
  5. :lol: That's funny.
     
  6. :lol:
     
  7. :roflmfao:
     
  8. I'm sooo doing something like that this semester when I don't know an answer (which will probably be often)
     
  9. That was hilarious!
     
  10. I can't believe I haven't checked this thread. I laughed so hard when I read the second test question. :roflmfao: :wlae:
     
  11. haha nice :biggrin:!
     
  12. hahaha! :roflmfao: so funny! who would have think of that.
     
  13. Besides the Elephant, I love Find X and I love Expand.




    The following is an actual question given on a University of Washington chemistry midterm:
    "Is Hell exothermic (gives off heat) or endothermic (absorbs heat)? Support your answer with a proof."
    Most of the students wrote proofs of their beliefs using Boyle's Law (gas cools off when it expands and heats up when it is compressed) or some variant.
    One student, however, wrote the following:
    First, we need to know how the mass of Hell is changing over time. So, we need to know the rate that souls are moving into Hell and the rate they are leaving. I think that we can safely assume that once a soul gets to Hell, it will not leave. Therefore, no souls are leaving. As for how many souls
    are entering Hell, let's look at the different religions that exist in the world today. Some of these religions state that if you are not a member of their religion, you will go to Hell. Since there are more than one of these religions and since people do not belong to more than one religion, we can
    project that all people and all souls go to Hell. With birth and death rates as they are, we can expect the number of souls in Hell to increase exponentially.
    Now, we look at the rate of change of the volume in Hell because Boyle's Law states that in order for the temperature and pressure in Hell to stay the same, the volume of Hell has to expand as souls are added. This gives two possibilities:
    (1) If Hell is expanding at a slower rate than the rate at which souls enter Hell, then the temperature and pressure in Hell will increase until all Hell breaks loose.
    (2) Of course, if Hell is expanding at a rate faster than the increase of souls in Hell, then the temperature and pressure will drop until Hell freezes over.
    So which is it? If we accept the postulate given to me by Ms. Therese Banyan during my Freshman year that "it will be a cold day in Hell before I sleep with you," and take into account the fact that I still have not succeeded in having sexual relations with her, then possibility (2) cannot be true, and thus I am sure that Hell is exothermic.
    He got the only A grade.
     
  14. Remember the book "Men are from Mars, Women are from Venus"? Well, here's a prime example of the differences between Men and Women offered by an English professor at Southern Methodist University:
    English 44A
    SMU, Creative Writing
    Prof. Miller
    In-class Assignment for Wednesday:
    "Today we will experiment with a new form called the tandem story. The process is simple. Each person will pair off with the person sitting to his or her immediate right. One of you will then write the first paragraph of a short story. The partner will read the first paragraph and then add another paragraph to the story. The first person will then add a third paragraph, and so on back and forth. Remember to re-read what has been written each time in order to keep the story coherent. The story is over when both agree a conclusion has been reached."
    "The following was actually turned in by two of my English students:
    Rebecca - last name deleted, and Gary - last name deleted."
    STORY:

    At first, Laurie couldn't decide which kind of tea she wanted. The chamomile, which used to be her favorite for lazy evenings at home, now reminded her too much of Carl, who once said, in happier times, that he liked chamomile. But she felt she must now, at all costs, keep her mind off Carl. His possessiveness was suffocating, and if she thought about him too much her asthma started acting up again. So chamomile was out of the question.
    -----------------------------------------------------------
    Meanwhile, Advance Sergeant Carl Harris, leader of the attack squadron now in orbit over Skylon 4, had more important things to think about than the neuroses of an air-headed asthmatic bimbo named Laurie with whom he had spent one sweaty night over a year ago. "A.S. Harris to Geostation 17," he said into his transgalactic communicator. "Polar orbit established. No sign of resistance so far..." But before he could sign off a bluish particle beam flashed out of nowhere and blasted a hole through his ship's cargo bay. The jolt from the direct hit sent him flying out of his seat and across the cockpit.
    ----------------------------------------------------------
    He bumped his head and died almost immediately, but not before he felt one last pang of regret for psychically brutalizing the one woman who had ever had feelings for him. Soon afterwards, Earth stopped its pointless hostilities towards the peaceful farmers of Skylon 4. "Congress Passes Law Permanently Abolishing War and Space Travel," Laurie read in her newspaper one morning. The news simultaneously excited her and bored her. She stared out the window, dreaming of her youth-- when the days had passed unhurriedly and carefree, with no newspapers to read, no television to distract her from her sense of innocent wonder at all the beautiful things around her. "Why must one lose one's innocence to become a woman?" she pondered wistfully.
    ---------------------------------------------------------
    Little did she know, but she had less than 10 seconds to live. Thousands of miles above the city, the Anu'udrian mothership launched the first of its lithium fusion missiles. The dim-witted wimpy peaceniks who pushed the Unilateral Aerospace Disarmament Treaty through Congress had left Earth a defenseless target for the hostile alien empires who were determined to destroy the human race. Within two hours after the passage of the treaty the Anu'udrian ships were on course for Earth, carrying enough firepower to pulverize the entire planet. With no one to stop them, they swiftly initiated their diabolical plan. The lithium fusion missile entered the atmosphere unimpeded. The President, in his top-secret mobile submarine headquarters on the ocean floor off the coast of Guam, felt the inconceivably massive explosion which vaporized Laurie and 85 million other Americans. The President slammed his fist on the conference table. "We can't allow this! I'm going to veto that treaty! Let's blow 'em out of the sky!"
    ----------------------------------------------------------
    This is absurd. I refuse to continue this mockery of literature. My writing partner is a violent, chauvinistic, semi-literate adolescent.
    ----------------------------------------------------------
    Yeah? Well, you're a self-centered tedious neurotic whose attempts at writing are the literary equivalent of Valium.
    ----------------------------------------------------------
    *******.
    ----------------------------------------------------------
    *****.
     
  15. High School Essay Contest: Worst Analogies

    He spoke with the wisdom that can only come from experience, like a guy who went blind because he looked at a solar eclipse without one of those boxes with a pinhole in it and now goes around the country speaking at high schools about the dangers of looking at a solar eclipse without one of those boxes with a pinhole in it. (Joseph Romm, Washington)

    She caught your eye like one of those pointy hook latches that used to dangle from screen doors and would fly up whenever you banged the door open again. (Rich Murphy, Fairfax Station)

    The little boat gently drifted across the pond exactly the way a bowling ball wouldn't. (Russell Beland, Springfield)

    McBride fell 12 stories, hitting the pavement like a Hefty Bag filled with vegetable soup. (Paul Sabourin, Silver Spring)

    From the attic came an unearthly howl. The whole scene had an eerie, surreal quality, like when you're on vacation in another city and "Jeopardy" comes on at 7 p.m. instead of 7:30. (Roy Ashley, Washington)

    Her hair glistened in the rain like nose hair after a sneeze. (Chuck Smith, Woodbridge)

    Her eyes were like two brown circles with big black dots in the center. (Russell Beland, Springfield)

    Bob was as perplexed as a hacker who means to access T:flw.quid55328.com\aaakk/ch@ung but gets T:\flw.quidaaakk/ch@ung by mistake (Ken Krattenmaker, Landover Hills)

    Her vocabulary was as bad as, like, whatever.

    He was as tall as a six-foot-three-inch tree. (Jack Bross, Chevy Chase)

    The hailstones leaped from the pavement, just like maggots when you fry them in hot grease. (Gary F. Hevel, Silver Spring)

    Her date was pleasant enough, but she knew that if her life was a movie this guy would be buried in the credits as something like "Second Tall Man." (Russell Beland, Springfield)

    Long separated by cruel fate, the star-crossed lovers raced across the grassy field toward each other like two freight trains, one having left Cleveland at 6:36 p.m. traveling at 55 mph, the other from Topeka at 4:19 p.m. at a speed of 35 mph. (Jennifer Hart, Arlington)

    The politician was gone but unnoticed, like the period after the Dr. on a Dr. Pepper can. (Wayne Goode, Madison, Ala.)

    They lived in a typical suburban neighborhood with picket fences that resembled Nancy Kerrigan's teeth (Paul Kocak, Syracuse, N.Y.)

    John and Mary had never met. They were like two hummingbirds who had also never met. (Russell Beland, Springfield)

    The thunder was ominous-sounding, much like the sound of a thin sheet of metal being shaken backstage during the storm scene in a play. (Barbara Fetherolf, Alexandria)

    His thoughts tumbled in his head, making and breaking alliances like underpants in a dryer without Cling Free (Chuck Smith, Woodbridge)

    The red brick wall was the color of a brick-red Crayola crayon.(Unknown)