Question for all french speaking members

  1. Does "les vogue" or "les vogues" mean anything in french? :shrugs:

    Like, would it make sense in a fashion-type-of-setting?
     
  2. It can mean various things, do you have a sentence it's being used in Vlad?

    When I hear the term "Les Vogues" I think of village festivals involving music, but it can also mean other things.
     
  3. Would it make sense to call a group of fashionable folks "les vogues"? Something along those lines.
     
  4. It can also mean.... sort of like, fashion trends, but French is complex because words and terms can be used in a variety of ways.
     
  5. It could make sense in terms of describing a fashion trend and those who subscribe to it, most certainly! :smile:
     
  6. excellent! :yahoo:

    P.S. The proper way to spell it is les vogues? My french is so rusty, it's not even funny.
     
  7. I'm sure mine is worse, my friend.

    What exactly are you trying to convey? It really depends on the context. (The Frenchies should be along in a couple hours if I am unable to help.)

    "Les vogues" would be a way to say "the fashions" in certain instances
     
  8. As Roo said, 'Les vogues' means 'the fashions'. From what I understand, you are trying to say a group of fashionable people. You could say 'Ils sont dans la mode' to say 'They are in fashion', or you could say 'Les fashionistas' to say 'the fashionistas', although I think fashionista is more of a slang term. To just flat out say 'A group of fashionable people', you could say 'Un groupe de gens a la mode'. I am pretty confident on my translations, and I hope was able to help a little bit. If I come up with something else, I will post.
     
  9. bump for more opinions!
     
  10. The word "vogue" is mostly used in french in the term "en vogue", "être en vogue" (to be in fashion). Or you can say "c est la grande vogue maintenant" (it´s all the rage now).
    So in french for someone who is trendy in a fashion way, we would "il est tendance" (he is trendy), "c est tendance"
    -For someone who´s into fashion we´d say "modeux, modeuse", "fashionista", and if it´s negative "fashion victim"
    So to conclude on "vogue" it is used as a common word in a sentence "la vogue", or as an adjective "en vogue", but not to qualify/call people
    (maybe if you say "les en-vogue").
     
  11. My BF is French (-Canadian), I'll ask him when he gets home!
     
  12. Bump!

    Basically, I am wondering if lesvogues.com would make sense for a fashion site. :yes:
     
  13. les vogue - the fashion
    example - in vogue
    Absolutley it makes sense and sounds great!
     
  14. It makes some sense - again as the others have said, french can translate differently in terms of how it's put in a sentence. The only thing is that you'd definitely need to use "vogues" and not "vogue" since "les" is plural and not singular.

    If you called your website "lesvogues.com", I'd interpret it to mean "the fashionables" or "the fashionable people".

    In french, I usually describe a group of fashionable people as 'a la mode' or 'en vogue' if that helps. My french is French-Canadian french, not France/Parisienne french though.
     
  15. What I would've said as well!