New BC completely eliminates monthly periods - would you take it?

  1. FDA Clears Wyeth Contraceptive Pill
    By JENNIFER CORBETT DOOREN
    May 23, 2007; Page A4
    WASHINGTON -- The Food and Drug Administration approved the first birth-control pill that is also designed to eliminate women's monthly periods.

    The pill, Wyeth's Lybrel, contains low-dose hormones and should be taken every day. Traditional birth-control pills contain 21 "active" pills with hormones and seven placebo pills. Women using traditional birth-control pills typically get a period a few days after taking the last active pill in a given month.

    Lybrel will come in a 28-day pill-pack. The pills contain 90 micrograms of a progestin, levonorgestrel, and 20 micrograms of an estrogen, ethinyl estradiol, which are also active ingredients in many other types of birth-control pills.

    Barr Pharmaceuticals Inc. markets two birth-control regimens that limits periods to four a year. All birth-control pills are designed to prevent pregnancy by stopping women from ovulating or releasing an egg. Other birth-control pills, such as Bayer AG unit Bayer Healthcare's Yaz, can shorten monthly periods.

    However, the FDA said many women using Lybrel will likely have unplanned, breakthrough bleeding or spotting, although such bleeding decreases over time. The FDA said one of the main studies of Lybrel showed 59% of the women who took Lybrel for one year had no bleeding or spotting during the last month of the study. Lybrel was studied in clinical trials involving more than 2,400 women ages 18 to 49.

    The FDA said the risks of using Lybrel are similar to the risks of other conventional oral contraceptives and include an increased risk of blood clots, heart attacks and strokes.

    Daniel Shames, a deputy director in FDA's Center for Drug Evaluation and Research said it doesn't appear that eliminating women's monthly periods poses any significant safety issues, but said Wyeth will study Lybrel after it is on the market to see if any unexpected safety problems develop. Like other low-dose birth-control pills, women's chances of becoming pregnant rise if they miss pills.

    Wyeth, based in Madison, N.J., said Lybrel would be available starting in July. The company applied for FDA approval of Lybrel in 2005, but the approval had been delayed partly until the company resolved problems with a manufacturing plant in Guayama, Puerto Rico, where Lybrel is made. Earlier this month, Wyeth said the FDA notified the company the problems found by the agency at the Guayama plant had been corrected.
     
  2. No, I wouldn't. Several years down the road they'll be telling you that it causes some unpleasant condition, I'm sure.
     
  3. It sounds good in concept, but only 59% who took it for a year don't have irregular spotting and bleeding? Doesn't sound like it really takes care of your period after all. I think have spotting and bleeding when you don't expect it is worse than having a regular period you know the dates to. Knowing my luck, the spotting would come at very inconvenient times!
     
  4. Just sad. These Dr's need to go back to the roots and figure women out...
     
  5. I can completely understand why women would want to take this type of BCP. Periods are annoying and many doctors say that the they are pretty much pointless unless you're trying to have a baby.

    I don't think I would take this pill though...I think if I really wanted to avoid my period during a certain time, I would just continue my BCP throughout my "placebo week"
     
  6. I take seasonique and only have my period 4 times a year, and in theory, I would take this pill and not miss my period at all. However, I am already prone to the spotting, which I hate, so I don't think I would take it for that reason.
     
  7. Just like sailornep5 said unexpected spotting is far more inconvenient than an expected period.

    I also wouldn't take it because there are bound to be unpleasant side effects.
     
  8. While on BC, you don't get a "real" period anyways. So periods are pretty much pointless.

    I still like to have my period...just to make sure!
     
  9. I'm on a pill called Mercilon (used it for 8 years now, also a low hormon pill), and I have my period 4 times a year. I don't care about my period so much, so I would give the new pill a try. I'm one of those lucky ones with no spotting/side effects.
     
  10. No, I would not. I agree w/ other posters who said "years down the road they'll be saying, oh sorry about the whole you grow a third arm thing...".

    Something just unnatural about it.

    Remeber the Thalidimide (sp?) babies????

    Plus, spotting????? NO THANKS! I perfectly fine w/ having my period when I expect it.
     
  11. Uh! Huh! I would be wearing a white bathing suit at some HUGE party! It would be SUPER FUN! :cursing:
     
  12. as I have major problems with the pill - anyway not an option. frankly you can tell the difference in your body with all the added hormones. but regardless I only see problems with this bec it is precisely the 'useless' period that is somehow part of the cycle of becoming a mother. i do think that BC can have an impact, and one where you don't have your period altogether sounds like a harsh impact on your body.

    oh, and I believe in BC and everything, but I do think that we should be aware of the related consequences, and sometimes I think there isn't enough information out there.
     
  13. Nope.
     
  14. I take loestrin (generic: microgestin) and I never get my period anyways, even on my off-week. I love not having it and my gyno says what many other docs say, that it's not necessary. I even read something in one of my mags that said there is scientific evidence that not having your period makes it easier to get pregnant because your uterus doesn't have to go through the trauma of shedding the lining each month. But who knows??
     
  15. I would do it because I hate getting my period, but I talked to my dr about it and he said that it's ok to skip your periods for a few months but it could mess w/ hormones if it's done on a long-term basis. Plus many women are prone to spotting, so I'll just stick with what works for now, which is back-to-backing 3-4 packs and then taking a break.