Help! I need some legal advice about NYC's Pet Law

  1. We currently own a co-op in Queens, NYC and when we first bought the apartment, we were told we would be allowed to have pets. A lot of the other tenants and residents here own pets as well. So we got a dog back in August and and in November the management office informed us it is not allowed. The contract signed when we first bought the place also says no pets, but we overlooked it.

    I read about the Pet Law in NYC and we definitely had the dog for more than 90 days (without hiding it) before we were notified about it being "illegal." Does the co-op board have the right to fine us for the pet after the 90 days? And do we really have to get rid of our dog? Is there any way around this?

    Please help! I don't want to give away my 9 mo old shih tzu! :sad:

    tia
     
  2. Well, who exactly told you you were allowed to have pets? Was it the landlord himself or just one of your neighbors?
     
  3. You admit you overlooked it. I think pretty much you will have to give up the pup or move. Co-op boards can pretty much have a say about what goes on with the tenants.
    The majority of co-ops in NYC do not allow dogs anyway. I know because when I used to go looking for rentals, I knew to avoid them. I got kicked out of a co-op once because they said I partied too much (I would come home at all hours of the night and people had a problem with that) . It is different than a condo where depending on the building, whether you can have animals or not.
     
  4. Try looking through this site: http://www.lawmall.com/petlaw/index.html , but I think unfortunately you're going to be fighting an uphill battle. You would have to prove that they knew about your dog for at least 3 months before filing an eviction notice, which would mean you'd have to hire an attorney and go to court. From what I've read, you can expect your legal fees to be somewhere from $5000-10,000. If you win, you could get your landlord to pay for them, but if you lose, you may be required to pay his (which would probably be higher). All in all it sounds like it would be a very expensive process, and would probably have a negative impact on your reputation as a renter. Is there no way you can find a new apartment?
     
  5. I agree with what's been said so far, and unfortunately, your "overlooking" the clause which said no pets is not going to be an acceptable defense. You signed that contract which means you agreed to all the terms in it.
     
  6. Thanks to all the responses but I thought there was an exception with the Pet Law in NYC and also since a lot of other people in the co-ops own dogs also and they are just singling us out.

    And we just recently bought the place (almost 2 yrs), so we were hoping not to resort to selling/rebuying a new place. :sad:
     
  7. ^^ i'm so sorry, nyc coops s*ck :tdown:

    p.s. i own one too & would never do it again
     
  8. ^^ fighting an eviction notice could cost $20-$50K in legal fees in nyc :push:...i don't think there's anyway you could do it for only $5-10K...and i'd avoid it at all costs, especially since you signed a contract stating no pets...i'm so sorry about your situation & if it were me, i'd sell & buy a condo :girlsigh: