Dew Claws?

  1. Is there an age limit to getting your dog's dew claws removed? I would like to do it for Scraps, as she will not stay still to have them trimmed and hers grow very fast, and I have read about dogs getting them stuck to carpet,etc and hurting themselves. She is almost 4. Also, what kind of pain medicine do they use? I don't want my baby to be hurting! I'm taking her in for a teeth cleaning soon, and they will put her under for that, so I thought maybe they could do it then.
     
  2. ^Great idea.

    Especially if your dog is really active, its a good idea to have them removed.

    They will most likely give your dog Rimadyl for a pain med, if he even needs any.

    He probably won't be in much pain at all...its a relatively simple procedure.

    Good luck! :smile:
     
  3. I think you can have it done at any time. I cannot understand why some breeders just don't feel the importance to do this days after they are born. It makes it so much easier on the pup...
     
  4. as a former shih tzu breeder, the best time is when they are puppies. i personally wouldn't recommend it for a 4 year old dog. rimadyl is a steroid and it's harsh on the liver.. you really don't want to be giving them a lot of that.
     
  5. Thanks everyone for your replies!
    I guess the best thing to do is talk to my vet. Lol.
     
  6. My vet says puppies only. We had a litter in Jan. their dew claws were done at 3 days.
    I have a yorkie who has his and they are a problem.
     
  7. They form into a bone after a certain age and become harder to remove. My boston ripped one of his out when he was very young so now he only has one left. He has never had a problem with his other I just make sure I keep it as short as possible. Rimadyl is not a good drug to give your dog. It does cause liver damage and even death, If I remember correctly there is even a class action lawsuit against the makers of it. I would do some major research before I gave it to my baby.
     
  8. We adopted Ginger when she was almost 3, and they removed her hind dew claws when they put her under for her spaying, so talk to your vet. If your dog will already be out for the dental work, they may be able to do the dew claw surgery at the same time.

    And like ragamuffin said, Rimadyl is not a good choice, so talk to your vet ahead of time to see what your other options are.
     
  9. EEEKKKKK!!!!!!!!!!!

    Please, I do appreciate that no animal likes it's nails trimmed, and funnily enough, I had a session last night doing exactly this to one of my pups, but there are ways to do it, without having to resort to surgery and an anaesthetic.

    I use FOOD! It's the only think that will distract her, but it works!

    I guess I'm the absolute minority, but declawing any animal, makes me feel a bit queezy.

    Respectfully,

    k
     
  10. Not DEclaw, DEW Claw. It's that weird little claw on the side of their legs. If they aren't permanently removed, they can get easily caught on carpets and such and get literally ripped off the dog. Trust me, that's a heck of a lot more painful than the surgery to remove it!
     
  11. We had a German shepherd mix who had her dew claws when we adopted her from the shelter. She lived her whole life and they never got caught on anything or caused any trouble. Since your dog has already lived four years without any problems, I'd say leave well enough alone.
     
  12. I've bred dogs and I don't do it the same reason I wouldn't dock tails or crop ears. I have never had an issue with my dogs catching on stuff. I try to touch their paws/nails a lot when they are young so that they will sit for nail clippings as an adult. I also encourage a lot of walks on cement since this helps naturally grind nails down.

    FYI - While the dog it out, you can also have the nails cut very short if you decide not to cut the dewclaw off completely. This is less painful.
     
  13. I agree, talk to your vet about it. When I used to work in general practice, we have removed dewclaws from adult dogs. It was catching on carpets, etc. It done properly with pain management, it can be done without much discomfort to the dog. I guess for some breeds, dewclaws are part of their 'guidelines' so they don't remove it for that reason...
     
  14. Thanks, but having dogs for nearly 40 years, I do know what a dew claw is! :smile: And as it *is* a claw, removing it is classed as "de-clawing"! ;)

    In the UK, de-clawing was made illegal with the Animal Welfare Act 2006, which explicitly prohibited "interference with the sensitive tissues or bone structure of the animal, otherwise than for the purposes of its medical treatment " Previous to this, it had been banned by the Royal College of Veterinary Surgeons for years.

    One of my pups actually caught and pulled out one of her main front claws a few years back. She was out in the garden, so no carpet was involved, and you are right, lots of blood and the little precious was nearly as traumatised as me! The claw grew back though!

    Just wondering, I knew that de-clawing cats was done in the US, and obviously de-clawing the dew claw in dogs also seems common, but, are dogs completely de-clawed?

    Thoughts?

    Peace

    K
     
  15. ^^^OK, just thought you might have misread it since declawing cats is in fact, very common here. ;)

    There is a movement to stop that awful procedure in lieu of teaching owners to clip cat's nails like one clips a dogs nails. There are also these little rubber gizmos that people can put on the cat's claws to protect the cats furniture. For ages, people thought that it was a safe procedure but apparently research is finding out that it really messes up a cat's nature/psyche when they don't have their claws. I'm not a cat person by any means, but this is what I've read recently and have been told by people that do have cats.

    I've never heard of declawing a dog (as one declaws a cat) before though. I imagine it's because dogs' nails aren't that sharp and they don't use them in the same way a cat would. I had never even heard of the dew claw until we got our Sam. His were SO pronounced that we did have them removed at the recommendation of our vet. Gracie (our new dog since Sam died) doesn't have very pronounced dew claws, so they were left intact.