Adoption/Rescue Rant!!!

  1. I live in the Puppy Mill Capitol of the country and I abhor everything that's related to 'em. That said, My daughters have wanted a dog for years and when they were 13 and 17, (last year) they researched many breeds and decided on a few that they thought would "match" our way of living. Anyway, they went to a "pet store" and fell in love with a chihuahua. They wanted to save him etc. I talked to them til they understood that saving that one puppy is giving encouragement to the mills and brokers to keep doing what they're doing and they agreed. Anyway, they're responsible and trustworthy and I believed that they would take really good care of a pet so we started applying with rescue groups. All of them turned us down because we had no experience with that particular breed. I understood so we then went to the Humane Society. We went three or four times a week for months and every dog that the kids chose, there was some reason why we couldn't get it. For example, my youngest daughter was thirteen and the adoption counselor thought it best if the youngest child in the home was at least fourteen. It's ironic as my younger daughter is MORE responsible than her older sister! Well, after months of daily seaches on line and getting turned down by the Humane Society, the girls were depressed and ready to give up. All of these people were denying a dog the chance to be a part of a wonderful family so I got an idea :idea:. I convinced the girls to go to the Humane Society just once more...When we got there, I told one of the adoption counselors that it seemed as though we would have to buy a dog from the pet store as we couldn't seem to adopt one and she give me the spill. (The same spill that I give btw) Anyway, we left and the kids were in tears.
    Continued below...
     
  2. I guaranteed the girls that we would hear from the Humane Society really soon but they doubted it. Guess what? The very next day, one of the adoption counselors called and said she had two puppies that would be a perfect match for our family and we could come in and adopt one. When the kids came home from school and heard the good news, they were estatic! They went to the HS website and looked for both dogs with no luck so we went on in and Miss Celie chose us! Turns out, neither dog was on the website. Anyway, she's been with us for almost a year and we can't imagine life without her. Even though I was ticked at the different groups initially, I realize that usually they have the dogs best interest in mind and without all of their turn downs, we would have never been blessed with Miss Ceilie. Btw, she's getting a brother in June!
     
  3. Ahhh, I'm so glad that you found your ideal puppy in the end and didn't have to resort to buying from a pet store. :biggrin:

    I know what you mean about them being a tad too careful, though. :yes:

    Even though I know they have the animals' best interest at heart - if they are so careful that people give up and buy a puppy from a puppy mill/a store that buys from a puppy mill, surely that's a far greater evil than them being slightly more flexible in their rehoming strategy?
     
  4. I agree. I understand them being careful in placing their adoptions in good homes, but it can be a catch 22 when it's so strict and drawn out to months where the person goes to a petstore. Once someone decides to bring a forever companion in his/her house, you're ready for one and waiting forever turns into anxiety. And if there are specifics that would be the perfect fit (size, breed, temperment)which is understandable, that can be even harder. I've noticed some strict rules and there are some that make it virtually impossible to adopt and when you finally fit the criteria, there's the same group of adoptees who are vying for the same dog because they're subject to the rules also so might as well hold a raffle. Although I didn't have children in the home (which was a deciding factor), I don't have a fully fenced yard since we live out in the country where no one has that becase they're yard is a couple of acres...lol. That kept me from alot of wonderful rescues. The dogs I ended up rescuing were older, and/or had serious medical issues or was told to run to the shelter to save one (which was old also). Although I was more than happy to take care of these loving dogs, they didn't have a chance for a long life. We know not every dog is immune to illness, but it was emotionally draining even when you knew what to expect. I can see someone waiting months and months then settling for a petshop dog who would have otherwise given a rescue dog (who'd been waiting a while to be adopted) a wonderful home. I appreciate rescues groups and what they do (I've even volunteered with one for a while), but I think a little more leniency would lessen the load of homeless pets waiting to be adopted.
     
  5. I wonder how they rationalize keeping some dogs from wonderful forever homes by not looking at individual situations. Surferchick for example...A dog living in the country without a fully fenced yard IMO is much better than a fenced yard in the city. I guess the fence is more important than cleaner air and less crime etc.
     
  6. Okay, before you ppl flame me. I'm not sure if I can handle a forever screening process just to be denied a chance for a pet. It really makes one consider just bypassing all the "red tape" and buy a puppy from the pet store.
     
  7. I am so with you on this point! My friends and I have had this discussion so many times over the years.

    I have had many dogs and in my adult life. Some I have found and kept, one I got from a farm, one from a breeder, others from the Humane Society and one from a Rescue group.

    I must say, the people I have dealt with at the shelters and rescue groups are sullen and unfriendly. Always. They are overly bureaucratic and authoritative. It's a most unpleasant atmosphere they create.

    We are thinking of adding a fourth dog to our pet family, but have already decided to purchase one from a breeder. The rescue process is too cumbersome and discouraging.
     
  8. That is great news! I'm sure you're beside yourself with anticipation and excitement.

    I'm glad your adoption story had a happy ending and that you have now saved two furry doggies. But, honestly, that seems like a lot of needless trauma and drama that you and your daughters had to go through. I, too, realize the importance of screening to place a pet in a safe environment, but often times the people making the ultimate "yes" or "no" decision are too discretionary.

    I applaud your persistancy in saving two pets and wish you a life time of happiness with your daughters and your doggies!
     

  9. I see your point, but when you consider

    1--the high chance for HUGE vet bills that a puppy mill pup will cost you due to the irresponsible breeding

    and

    2--that by buying a dog from a pet store, you are perpetuating the cycle of cruelty and abuse,

    I think that waiting for the rescue group to screen you and approve the adoption are worth it.

    It is unfortunate that some rescues are creating a sullen, hostile environment...they should be happy and excited to place their animals, but it is their responsibility to the animals they hold in their care to make sure that the home is a proper one.

    Alot of animals who are up for adoption have had a very rocky life...they deserve to be put into caring, safe homes with people who have enough time and resources for them.

    Not everyone should own a pet, and I think that those who are not approved feel an attitude of "Who are THEY to tell me that I can't have a pet".
     

  10. Congrats! Your pup sounds so cute!!!
     
  11. My post by all means does not mean I condone commercial breeding or puppy mills/farms that supply the vast majority of pet shops and brokers with sick puppies for sale.

    Don't be so hasty by being judgmental at the individuals with the assumption they are perpetuating a vicious cycle attributed by commercial and puppy mill breeders.

    It just seems that bureaucratic red tape hurts many nurturing families that are able to provide a rescue animal with a loving and secure home.

    No one has mention that they are being told what they can our cannot have a pet. That's almost like denying the sick, elderly, and homeless people they are not the perfect candidate for a re-home companion.

    The perception that everyone should not own a pet might be only in your mindset.

    Maybe a little more consideration would be the best solution for those that seek pets from rescue shelters... I don't know just my opinion.:shrugs:





     
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  13. I wasn't approved at first and I didn't have this kind of attitude at all. I actually felt sad that a dog was missing out on a wonderful forever home due to various silly reasons, for example...My youngest child was thirteen and not fourteen as one counselor wanted.
     
  14. For those having a hard time at humane societies, try a *city* or town-run shelter!

    I never knew the difference until I moved to L.A. and I went to get a dog and looked at any old shelter - I just knew I wanted a shelter dog. The process was MUCH easier and the people were much more friendly. I have since *tried* the Humane Society in my area and they treated me like I was abusing animals when I asked for an adoption application.

    I have referred friends my hometown to the city shelter and they say it was a much more pleasant experience. So, that's two cities I know of with city shelters that are more pleasant than privately-run shelters.

    I grew up with all adopted mutts and they are the BEST!
     
  15. Thank you but I can't take all of this credit! Actually, even though I believe in the idea of what the shelters and rescue group are doing, I would never go through that again. IMO, The only reason they allowed me to adopt was because I "threatened" to buy from a pet store. This time I went to a good breeder!