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I really need advice.

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Aug 2, 2012, 1:08am   #16
Lioness71's Avatar
Lioness71
Lioness71
I have a somewhat different opinion (not about the for-profit online schools - absolutely stay away) because you seem to be looking at this as an either-or situation. I think you should concentrate for now on finding whatever full-time job that you can (especially if you can find something with benefits). There have to be other options for after-school care - perhaps a college student that could pick up the kids and watch them for a few hours a day.

Everyone and their brother is going back to school right now, but graduates are having a hard time finding work as well. Being a single mom with young kids, you're not in a situation where you have the luxury of winging it like a 19-year-old (I don't mean that unkindly, just matter-of-factly). Living on loans for four years (especially if they are truly covering living expenses and not just coursework) is a recipe for financial disaster when you have to start paying the piper. I don't agree with everything Suze Orman says, but student loans are a major crisis right now and over the past few months many of her shows have focused on it. You have also already tried college one way and "hated it". It just may not be a good fit for you, so putting all of your eggs in that basket may not be the best solution.

I'm not saying that you shouldn't pursue a degree, I just think it should be part-time or exploratory in the near term. You need a real gameplan, being fairly certainty about what you want to do and the opportunities there would be, and reasonable knowledge about what qualifications you would need to do that work. "Computer Technology" covers an extremely broad range of careers. Look at job postings to see the requirements and do as much research as you possibly can before locking yourself in.


Edit - I don't have a lot of posts but I'm on the forums every day (I just rarely take the time to comment). I really do mean all of this kindly and I apologize if it sounds very direct since I haven't established a "tone" here like other posters. Although I haven't been in your situation, I can tell that you're in a difficult place. I do wish you all the best.
Last edited Aug 2, 2012 at 1:15am.
Aug 2, 2012, 3:33pm   #17
~Fabulousity~'s Avatar
~Fabulousity~
Member
Originally Posted by Lioness71
I have a somewhat different opinion (not about the for-profit online schools - absolutely stay away) because you seem to be looking at this as an either-or situation. I think you should concentrate for now on finding whatever full-time job that you can (especially if you can find something with benefits). There have to be other options for after-school care - perhaps a college student that could pick up the kids and watch them for a few hours a day.

Everyone and their brother is going back to school right now, but graduates are having a hard time finding work as well. Being a single mom with young kids, you're not in a situation where you have the luxury of winging it like a 19-year-old (I don't mean that unkindly, just matter-of-factly). Living on loans for four years (especially if they are truly covering living expenses and not just coursework) is a recipe for financial disaster when you have to start paying the piper. I don't agree with everything Suze Orman says, but student loans are a major crisis right now and over the past few months many of her shows have focused on it. You have also already tried college one way and "hated it". It just may not be a good fit for you, so putting all of your eggs in that basket may not be the best solution.

I'm not saying that you shouldn't pursue a degree, I just think it should be part-time or exploratory in the near term. You need a real gameplan, being fairly certainty about what you want to do and the opportunities there would be, and reasonable knowledge about what qualifications you would need to do that work. "Computer Technology" covers an extremely broad range of careers. Look at job postings to see the requirements and do as much research as you possibly can before locking yourself in.


Edit - I don't have a lot of posts but I'm on the forums every day (I just rarely take the time to comment). I really do mean all of this kindly and I apologize if it sounds very direct since I haven't established a "tone" here like other posters. Although I haven't been in your situation, I can tell that you're in a difficult place. I do wish you all the best.
Aug 13, 2012, 4:37pm   #18
terps08's Avatar
terps08
Member
I just saw this and thought of you OP. I'm still wary of for-profit colleges and universities, but there are also legit online schools.

http://www.ecampusnews.com/top-news/...ees-skyrocket/

Quote:
Online education degrees skyrocket
Four online universities are now the largest education schools in the U.S., analysis shows
From wire service reports

Online schools offer more master’s degrees than top traditional universities.
Virtually unknown a decade ago, big online teacher education programs now dwarf their traditional competitors, outstripping even the largest state university teachers’ colleges.

A USA TODAY analysis of newly released U.S. Department of Education data finds that four big universities, operating mostly online, have quickly become the largest education schools in the U.S. Last year the four schools—three of which are for-profit—awarded one in 16 bachelor’s degrees and post-graduate awards and nearly one in 11 advanced education awards, including master’s degrees and doctorates.

A decade ago, in 2001, the for-profit University of Phoenix awarded 72 education degrees to teachers, administrators, and other school personnel through its online program, according to federal data. Last year, it awarded nearly 6,000 degrees, more than any other university. By contrast, Arizona State University, one of the largest traditional education schools in the U.S., awarded 2,075 degrees, most of them on campus. Columbia University’s Teachers College awarded 1,345 degrees.

Traditional colleges still produce most of the bachelor’s degrees in teaching—ASU topped the list with 979 bachelor’s degrees in 2011. But online schools such as Phoenix and Walden University awarded thousands more master’s degrees than even the top traditional schools, all of which are pushing to offer online coursework. Every one of the top 10 now offers an online education credential.

“We shouldn’t be surprised, because the whole industry is moving in that direction,” said Robert Pianta, dean of the University of Virginia’s Curry School of Education. “The thing I would be interested in knowing is the degree to which they are simply pushing these things out in order to generate dollars or whether there’s some real innovation in there."

For-profit universities have been the subject of intense scrutiny in Congress. Sen. Tom Harkin, D-Iowa, who chairs the Senate Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions Committee, last week released findings from a two-year investigation showing that they cost more than comparable not-for-profit schools and have higher dropout rates. For-profits, the investigation found, enroll about 10 percent of U.S. college students but account for nearly 50 percent of student loan defaults.

Online education schools, many of which have open-enrollment policies similar to community colleges, say their offerings are high quality. Most of the top ones are accredited by the same organizations that certify traditional teacher education programs. And they stress that students don’t just sit around in their pajamas.

Janet Williams, interim associate dean for educator licensure programs at Walden’s Richard W. Riley College of Education & Leadership, said her student-teachers must undergo a full semester in a real-live K-12 school as a “demonstration teacher,” paired with a master teacher and supervisor in the school district. Walden’s education school is named after the former U.S. Secretary of Education under President Clinton.

Meredith Curley, dean of the University of Phoenix College of Education, said many students are returning to complete their education after starting families and changing careers. Their average age is 33, she said, and many work while they attend classes.

Becky Lodewyck, Phoenix’s associate dean, said teaching candidates must complete at least 100 hours of field experience. She said online classes are “incredibly dynamic” and have the potential to hold students more accountable than face-to-face classes. “You can’t hide,” she said. “Everyone participates—everyone has to be fully engaged in the work.”
(c) 2012, USA Today. Visit USA Today online at http://www.usatoday.com. Distributed by MCT Information Services.
Aug 14, 2012, 12:30pm   #19
~Fabulousity~'s Avatar
~Fabulousity~
Member
"Most of the top ones are accredited by the same organizations that certify traditional teacher education programs."

One size does not fit all when it comes to online colleges, I thought accreditation matters most. They aren't all accredited the same way and employers know this. My manager discussed this once in a meeting. I have to admit I wouldn't sign up for University of Phoenix. I need a brick and mortar school that also offers online courses. Or maybe they do this too? IDK I've just seen commercials.
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