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Are new college grads getting more and more entitled these days??

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Jul 27, 2012, 12:08am   #31
ms-whitney's Avatar
ms-whitney
shopaholic
and IT is one of the few if not only field I know of that doesn't experience unemployment or worry about $$, programmers who are still wet behind the ear makes easily 6k a month if not more--I know a programmer who made 200k starting with this mobile app game co in sf
Jul 27, 2012, 12:16am   #32
juneping's Avatar
juneping
couch potato-ing
Originally Posted by ms-whitney
and IT is one of the few if not only field I know of that doesn't experience unemployment or worry about $$, programmers who are still wet behind the ear makes easily 6k a month if not more--I know a programmer who made 200k starting with this mobile app game co in sf
not really...can't say for IT
but my sis is a programmer...it's hard industry to stay competitive...b/c new comers are always more welcome then veterans....they did lay ppl off...
Jul 27, 2012, 12:25am   #33
ms-whitney's Avatar
ms-whitney
shopaholic
^depends on your location then

I've interned at an IT too and they not only paid for transportation, food and money left over they also took us out to lunches, brought us beer, cake, etc for birthdays..very relaxed for sure, the head of the company brought a fancy chair, not thousands mind you just under one, because the one that was supplied wasn't as comfortable, he has the exact one at home.

his startup is well funded but since a lot of it is from his pocket he has a certain amount that he's willing to pay programmers and I've seen quite a few walk out because the salary he was offering wasn't high enough. if I got a couple hundred a month just for sitting down doing some light paper work for a few hours a week..I got to choose when I go in and when I want to leave as well as how long of a lunch I wanted, I got paid regardless

I can't imagine how much he offered an actual programmer suffice to say

in SF if you are a programmer you get your pick

in fact, a programmer to be (current attending school in Uni of TO, Canada) is in SF for this summer, 3 months, interning only mind you

guess how much his contract states he gets from twitter? 18k

not bad

there are also active IT recruiters in sf, met one in jury duty
Jul 27, 2012, 12:29am   #34
ms-whitney's Avatar
ms-whitney
shopaholic
I do hear you about the competitiveness part though, but I think that goes for any job, if you can't do it better then someone else why would they not go for the one that is more skilled? but companies are willing to pay for good work, so it's hard to say they're going to throw you over for someone that is younger just because they are willing to work for less then you--unless they're just as skilled because IT is really about being able to do good work, fast.
Jul 27, 2012, 12:52am   #35
juneping's Avatar
juneping
couch potato-ing
Originally Posted by ms-whitney
I do hear you about the competitiveness part though, but I think that goes for any job, if you can't do it better then someone else why would they not go for the one that is more skilled? but companies are willing to pay for good work, so it's hard to say they're going to throw you over for someone that is younger just because they are willing to work for less then you--unless they're just as skilled because IT is really about being able to do good work, fast.
i work in arch...so the longer i stay the more valuable i become assuming my experience proportional to my years in the work force....just working in an office is like learning something new everyday. but not for programmer....that's what i got from my sister....
Jul 27, 2012, 3:56am   #36
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kaitydid
Member
Originally Posted by laurakasbaum
They were UPSET CRYING over getting ONLY $55K?! As a nurse, I will barely be making that as a new grad, and that was JUST THEIR BONUS?!
Seriously! I'm studying to be a teacher. I would be crying in happiness if my starting salary was $55K! I can't believe they were crying over that amount for a BONUS!
Jul 27, 2012, 4:38am   #37
ms-whitney's Avatar
ms-whitney
shopaholic
^ I know a teacher who was lucky enough to break the 50k mark and that's after tenure! but the teachers in california definitely have one of the best retirement benefits..

juneping--so far from my own observations in general managers and owners appreciate you more when you work hard and you do a good job regardless of the years you've worked--worked years only impress future employers because that means you have dedication and you are loyal and see things through-much like graduating from college even if half the time it's nothing to do with your current position.

but that said, office politics always come into play too. I hate it and I don't manage well with that thinking but luckily have been (this time around) doing so apparently indirectly simply by getting to know my peers and elders and also remembering tibits about them on top of working hard.

but I could have easily found myself in a position where the manager doesn't like me and then no matter what I do it is magnified, I have actually experienced that in the past and got out fast (as I could)

does ur sister also live in NYC? sf seems to be te new palo alto and although it's nowhere as packed, fast and as cultured as NYC--if she's is single she might consider moving over
Jul 27, 2012, 4:43am   #38
ms-whitney's Avatar
ms-whitney
shopaholic
also wanted to say there are always new versions of code as well as new ways of coding and a lot to learn..much like your office.

actually my friend/former coworker just went to a programmers like convention in Texas
Jul 27, 2012, 4:46am   #39
l
lisacakes
Member
Just to pop in and say that I'm currently a teacher in CA and I'm making $55k this upcoming school year as a first year probationary teacher (although I'm technically a second year teacher because I worked as an intern teacher this past year), so it's possible! this is including working summer school.
Jul 27, 2012, 5:18am   #40
Sternchen's Avatar
Sternchen
Member
Originally Posted by labelwhore04
If i got a 50k bonus, i'd probably cry with happiness.
I think I'd cry tears of joy if I even MADE 50k a year!
Jul 27, 2012, 1:51pm   #41
goodmornin's Avatar
Thread Starter
goodmornin
yanko
Originally Posted by ms-whitney
t

that's always behind closed doors, never in front of your boss..and to top it off they were actually crying?!

yeah that sucks that they didn't have the brains to act better, how people view you at work also comes into play when it comes to promotions and raises
As Kelly Cutrone says - "If you have to cry, go outside".....
Jul 27, 2012, 2:08pm   #42
kaitydid's Avatar
kaitydid
Member
Originally Posted by ms-whitney
^ I know a teacher who was lucky enough to break the 50k mark and that's after tenure! but the teachers in california definitely have one of the best retirement benefits..
Originally Posted by lisacakes
Just to pop in and say that I'm currently a teacher in CA and I'm making $55k this upcoming school year as a first year probationary teacher (although I'm technically a second year teacher because I worked as an intern teacher this past year), so it's possible! this is including working summer school.
Oh, I know it's possible in California. My mom (an elementary school teacher with her masters) made around $60K, if I remember correctly, working for a school in California. But I'm actually hoping NOT to teach in California. I'm hoping to find a job in the South somewhere (where I'm actually attending college and had grown up in most of my life before my family's big move to California) when the time comes, so I'm not expecting to make $50K+ right off the bat. I'll be really surprised if I do!
Jul 28, 2012, 9:38am   #43
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Frugalfinds
Member
I'm a college instructor and I don't make as much as their bonus...

I don't think it is just the 'rich' kids who feel this way. I have students all of the time who expect to make tons of $$$ right out of college. In fact it isn't just limited to money. I once had a student tell me that I should do what he says because he pays my salary. They have all been coddled and expect the world to provide for them. I'm not a lot older than them, but it sickens me.
Jul 28, 2012, 2:24pm   #44
d
doreenjoy
zzz
Originally Posted by Frugalfinds
I once had a student tell me that I should do what he says because he pays my salary. They have all been coddled and expect the world to provide for them. I'm not a lot older than them, but it sickens me.
Omg. That's unreal.

When I was hiring an executive assistant, I chose a retired-from-university-teaching 68 year old woman. She knew what it meant to work. The young candidates all expected to be able to surf FB on the job, and they had wacky notions about what they would and wouldn't do, eg filing. My EA has a Ph.D. and less entitlement than a kid fresh out of college.
Jul 28, 2012, 3:34pm   #45
juneping's Avatar
juneping
couch potato-ing
Originally Posted by ms-whitney

juneping--so far from my own observations in general managers and owners appreciate you more when you work hard and you do a good job regardless of the years you've worked--worked years only impress future employers because that means you have dedication and you are loyal and see things through-much like graduating from college even if half the time it's nothing to do with your current position.

i wasn't talking about that aspect...i was just talking about the experience. an architect of 20 years experience is def not the same as an architect of 5 years experience...regardless what their work ethics are. sometimes the job just need someone with a lot of experience and sometimes they just need someone to draft..
when an architect works on buildings for 20 years is def more valuable than someone doing cheap corridor/bathroom renovation for 20 years.

but that said, office politics always come into play too. I hate it and I don't manage well with that thinking but luckily have been (this time around) doing so apparently indirectly simply by getting to know my peers and elders and also remembering tibits about them on top of working hard.

but I could have easily found myself in a position where the manager doesn't like me and then no matter what I do it is magnified, I have actually experienced that in the past and got out fast (as I could)

yes...i just got out of that also...i love my new job. at least i am not being mentally abused on a daily basis.

does ur sister also live in NYC? sf seems to be te new palo alto and although it's nowhere as packed, fast and as cultured as NYC--if she's is single she might consider moving over
my sister actually lives in north CA...i know they make good money but from what she told me it's just more competitive when she gets older...and i found myself at a different scenario...
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